Version 6.4.2017

 

Litera L (Li-Ly)

 

Liddell, St. John:

CS-BrigGen; Mitglied im Stab von Gen Albert S. Johnson's im Department of the West; er suchte im Januar 1862 im Rang eines Col als Abgesandter von Gen Albert Sidney Johnson in Richmond Präsident Davis auf (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 17)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Hughes, Nathaniel C. jr. (ed.): Liddell's Record: St. John Richardson Liddell Brigadier General, CSA Staff Officer and Brigade Commander Army of Tennessee, Dayton, 1985

 

 

Liggat, John A.:

CS-Pvt; Co. E, 8th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 34).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Liggat, John A.: Letter, 6 June 1865, from John A. Liggat (1825-1879), Company E, 8th Virginia Infantry, at Point Lookout, Mary­land, prison, to Alfred Stith Lee (1819-1912), of Richmond, Virginia, asking Lee to find out how his sister, Mary M. Liggat Tunstall Brooks (1821-1888) and her family are doing and stating that he's written them and received no response. Letter includes note from Lee to Liggat's brother-in-law J. G. Brooks (b. ca. 1809) regarding the letter (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 50589)

 

 

Lightburn, Joseph Andrew Jackson:

US-BrigGen; 1824-1901; geboren in Pennsylvania; Lightburn bewarb sich um einen Platz in West Point, der jedoch an "Stonewall" Jackson vergeben wurde; im Mexikokrieg zunächst Pvt, dann Sgt; dann Farmer und Müller; am 24.4.1861 war Lightburn Ab­geord­ne­ter der Convention in *Wheeling auf der mehrheitlich der Anschluß von West Virginia an die CSA beschlossen wurde; 14.8.1861 Col 4th West Virginia Infantry (US); er war Nachfolger von Cox als Kommandeur der US-Kräfte im Kanawha Valley vom 15.8.1861-September 1862 und leitete den US-Rückzug vor Loring's Truppen; 14.3.1863 BrigGen (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 482-83); in der Vicksburg Campaign Brigadekommandeur von Lightburn's Brigade (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 595, III 882, 897, 961, 999).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Cook, Roy B.: "Joseph Andrew Jackson Lightburn." West Virginia History, vol. XV (1953)

 

 

Lightfoot, Charles Edward:

CS-Col; Charles E. Lightfoot (b. 1834 d.1878) graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1854. During the Civil War, he served in the 6th and 22nd North Carolina Infantry Regiments, and in the Richmond, Virginia artillery defense forces [+++prüfen+++.

 

Lightfoot ist als LtCol, Co. F&S, 6th Regiment North Carolina Infantry genannt (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23) und als Col 22nd Regiment North Carolina Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

Enlisted on 5/16/1861, he was commissioned as a Major, Field & Staff NC 6th Infantry. Promoted to Lt. Col 7/11/1861. Wounded 7/21/1861 Manassas, VA. while in Command of Regiment after "the fall of Col. Fisher" (killed) in that battle. On 3/29/1862 he was elected/commissioned 3/29/1862 as Colonel into Field & Staff NC 22nd Infantry. POW 5/31/1862 Seven Pines, VA.; confined 6/1862 Fort Delaware, DE.; paroled 8/1862 Aiken's Landing, VA.; exchanged 8/5/1862 Aiken's Landing, VA. Placed in command 9/1862 of a battalion of heavy artillery, Richmond defenses. Paroled in Richmond 4/24/1865.Founder of the the Culpeper Military Institute, postwar he reopened that school in 1866 after renaming it The Virginia High School, later Bethel Military Academy (vgl. www. fin­dagrave.com)

 

Urkunden, Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lightfoot, Charles Edward: Charles E. Lightfoot Civil War Letter VMI Archives Manuscript 0448 (http://digitalcollections.vmi.edu/ cdm/ref/collection/p15821coll11/id/1754)

 

 

Lightfoot, Charles Edward:

CS-Col; Caroline Light Artillery of Virginia

 

„The Caroline Light Artillery of Virginia was formed in summer of 1861 commanded by Captain Thomas R. Thornton and was near Richmond until it was sent to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida where it served until to fall of 1862. It then re­turned to Richmond and was assigned to the defences of the city. The battery stayed in the Richmond defences until the end of the war. It took part in the fighting around Richmond and the James River area in 1864 and Richmond in 1865, ending the war at Appo­mattox in April 1865.

 

A artillery battalion was formed early in 1863 which was commanded by Lt Col Charles E. Lightfoot for service in the outer line of the Richmond Defences. This battalion had the Caroline Light Artillery of Virginia commanded by Capt. Thomas R. Thornton of 6 guns, the Surrey Light Artillery of Virginia commanded by Capt. James D. Hankins of 4 guns, the Nelson #2 Light Artillery of Virgi­nia commanded by Capt. James Henry Rives of 4 guns. There was a fourth battery assigned to the battalion for a short period, the Alexandria Artillery of Virginia commanded by Capt. David C. Smoot. This battery remained with the battalion in the Richmond Defences until about November 1863, when it left to be converted to a heavy artillery battery. It would become part of the 18th Virginia Heavy Artillery Battalion still serving in the Richmond defences. The battery referred to as the Nelson Light Artillery, Company B was actually known as the Nelson Artillery #2 formed in 1861.

It was proposed by General Pendleton in November 1863,to send Lt. Col. Lightfoot to Lee's Army to command the artillery battalion commanded by Colonel Henry Cabell. Col. Cabell was to command Lightfoot's Battalion. This exchange of officers never was acted on.

Lightfoot's Battalion went through most of the war in the Richmond Defences and the final campaigns, Petersburg and Appomattox. The Battalion had a strength of 319 men in May, 1864 and in April 1865, surrendered at Appomattox with only 31 men present com­manded by the Assistant Surgeon J. B. Coakley.“ (Angabe bei http://history-sites.net/cgi-bin/bbs62x/cwartmb/webbbs_config.pl?md=read;id=1741).

 

 

Lightfoot, Edward F.:

US-Pvt; Co. B, 44th Regiment Indiana Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44); mustered in Co. B on 3.10.1862; † 22.3.1863 (vgl. Rerick: The 44th Indiana Volunteers in the Rebellion, a.a.O., S. 155).

 

Edward F. Lightfoot, of Co. B, recruited man enrolled Sep. 13, 1862 in Pierceton by Capt. Heath as a Private; mustered in Oct. 3, 1862 in Indianapolis by Capt. Webb at age 22. He was 5Œ 9 tall, fair complexion, blue eyes, and light hair. Born in Holmes Co., OH, employed as a farmer, single, resident of Pierceton, in Kosciusko Co., IN. Died of typhoid fever Mar. 22, 1863 in Murfrees­boro, TN with rank of Private. Notes: Brother to Levi; son of Anny Weir and Daniel Lightfoot. Fought at Stone River. Died in Field Hospital; buried the next day in Sec. I, Grave #511 (now O-6109), Stones River National Battlefield Cemetery, Murfreesboro, Ru­therford Co., TN.  (vgl. www.findagrave.com; Taken from The Iron Men of Indiana's 44th Regiment, Part 1: Biographies and Re­gimental Statistics by Margaret Hobson). 

 

 

Lightfoot, James W.:

US-Pvt; Co. 31st Regiment Iowa Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M541 Roll 16); † 12.4.1863, beerd. Memphis National Ceme­tery, Memphis/Tennessee (vgl. www.findagrave.com unter Bezugnahme auf US Veteran's Affairs Record).

 

 

Likens, James B.:

CS-Col; 35th Regiment Texas Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 22).

 

1829 Morgan County/GA (vgl. Block: James B. Likens) bzw. 1830 (vgl. Grabstein-Photo by www.findagrave, Abruf vom 10.6.2016; Anm. der Grabstein wurde erst 2011 aufgestellt und enthält möglicherweise einen Fehler) - † 18.9.1878 Houston, Harrison County/Texas; beerd. Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Harrison County/Texas (vgl. Block: James B. Likens); S. v. Thomas W. Likens (geb. 1800 in Tennessee) und Hester F. Likens (geb. 1795 in Maryland); °°

 

James B. Likens, early East Texas lawyer and veteran of two wars, was born in Morgan County, GA, in 1829. His parents were Thomas M. Likens (born 1800 in Tennessee) and Hester F. Likens (born 1795 in Maryland). The latter may well have been his step­mother since Thomas M. Likens married Mrs. Hettie Irving in Georgia on May 7, 1830. He also had an older brother, John T., who was born in Tennessee in 1827 (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O.; vgl. 7th Census of the United States, 1850, Rusk County, Texas, pp. 553-554). The Thomas M. Likens family is believed to have moved to Henderson, Rusk County, Texas between 1840-1842. George Al­ford, born in 1836, moved with his family to Nacogdoches, TX, as a child, and he reported attending a school with—“the Honorable James B. Likens, the illustrious lawyer...” (Block: Likens, a.a.O.; vgl. Sid S. Johnson, Texans Who Wore the Gray, p. 145).

 

At age 17, young James  enlisted in 1846 in Capt. Samuel Highsmith’s Co. K, of Col. W. R. Young’s 3rd Texas Regiment during the Mexican War (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O.; vgl.  Inscription on Likens’ tombstone in Glenwood Cemetery, Houston).

 

According to Highsmith’s biography, his company participated in the Battles of Monterrey, Palo Alto, and Buena Vista as part of Gen. Zachary Taylor’s command. Young Likens’ father, Thomas M. Likens, was a first lieutenant, and his older brother, John T. Li­kens, was a second sergeant in the same company (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Hinweis auf: Biography of Capt. Samuel Highs­mith in Handbook of Texas Online; also Charles Spurlin, Texas Veterans in the Mexican War  [1984], p. 123).

 

After returning home from battle in 1847, young J. B. Likens studied and read law in the law office of Likens and Estill (Thomas M. Likens and W. H. Estill) in Henderson (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O. unter Hinweis auf Rusk County, Texas, census, 1850, pp. 553-554). The Likens family fortune multiplied greatly during the decade of the 1850s. On July 19, 1853 James B. Likens married Salina A. Cameron in Henderson (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O. unter Hinweis auf Rusk County Marriage Book, Vol. A, p. 13), and by the time of the 1860 census, 2 children had been born into the household, Mary E., born in 1855, and Benjamin O., born in 1856.  In 1853 Thomas M. Likens was still an attorney, but no longer practicing, and he had given up his position in the firm of Likens and Estill to his son James, in order to become a farmer and merchant. In 1860 T. M. Likens was living at census residence No. 1 with his wife Hester. His financial status was greatly improved during that decade, from $1,000 in 1850 to $2,500 in real estate and $5,165 in per­sonal property in 1860. In 1855, T. M. Likens sold 5 acres of land which became the Henderson City Cemetery. He also classified himself as a farmer in the 1860 census, and owned probably a section or more of land in that year. He also owned 2 slaves in 1850 and 5 slaves in 186o. His older son, John T. Likens, died on May 11, 1859, having lost his wife and son a few years earlier (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O. unter Hinweis auf 1860 Rusk County census, Sch. I, p. 315b; also 1850, 1860 Rusk County, Schedule II, Slave Census; Book E, p. 79, Rusk County Deed Records; M. W. Lambert, “A List of Lawyers in Texas in 1853,” online).

 

It was the terrible Henderson business district fire of Aug. 5, 1860 that provided the catalyst for James B. Likens to move away. In fact, when he was enumerated in the 1860 Rusk County census on Aug. 12th, he was living at residence No. 1602 in the town of Alma. J. B. Likens personal estate in that census included $4,000 of real property and $7,500 in personal property. In two hours’ time, fire swept through the business district (“from McDonaugh’s Hotel to Smither’s office, from Redwine’s Store to Likens’ Corner”) with a loss of 48 buildings and store stock equal to $250,000 (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf Gloria Mayfield, “The Great Fire of 1860,” online; the 1860 Rusk County census, p. 311, res. 1602). And no one lost more heavily than the Likens family members. The law office of Likens and Estill suffered $5,000 damage to the buildings, furniture, and law books; Thomas M. Likens’ store suffered $12,000 damage to the building, fixtures, and stock of merchandise; and the estate of John T. Likens suffered $2,000 loss to building and fixtures. Heavily stricken in his pocket book, James B. Likens moved his family to Sabine Pass about Oct. 1860, and opened his new law office there (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf New York Times, Aug. 27, 1860, p. 8).

 

Likens had already built up a new practice in the thriving seaport town by April, 1861, when Fort Sumter fell to the Confederates and the Civil War began. On April 20, 1861, Sabine Pass organized a 102-man militia company designated as the “Sabine Pass Guard,” and Likens was enlisted as a private.  Following a 90-day enlistment period, the company was reorganized and enrolled, and Likens was elected captain, most probably because of his active combat experience during the Mexican War (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf W. T. Block, A History of Jefferson County from Wilderness to Reconstruction (Nederland: 1976), p. 99)

 

In Sept. 1861, Capt. Likens visited Gen. Paul O. Hebert’s Confederate headquarters in Galveston with a request to organize the 6th Battalion at Sabine Pass. Gen. Hebert not only granted his request, but also promoted him to Major of battalion, at the same time in­ducting Likens’ troops into the Confederate Army. Soon Likens Battalion had 6 companies assigned to it, 2 from Sabine Pass, and others from several Southeast Texas counties (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf “Memoirs of Capt. K. D. Keith,” Te­xas Gulf Historical and Biographical Record, X (Nov. 1974), 55; W. T. Block, “The Swamp Angels: History of Spaight’s 11th Texas Battalion,” East Texas Historical Journal, XXX (1992), 45; Block, “Sabine Pass in the Civil War,” East Texas Historical Journal, IX (1971), 129-139. In June 1862, Likens resigned in order to enroll a battalion of cavalry; and Capt. Ashley Spaight of Company F, was promoted to lieutenant colonel of Spaight’s 11th Battalion of Texas Volunteers (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf W. T. Block, A History of Jefferson County from Wilderness to Reconstruction (Nederland: 1976), p. 100).

 

Later Major Likens moved into several Central Texas counties to enlist a battalion of cavalry known as Likens Cavalry Battalion. On Oct. 23, 1863, his unit was merged with Burns Cavalry Battalion to form the new 35th Texas Cavalry Regiment, and Likens was pro­moted to Colonel. In January, 1864, the 35th Texas Cavalry Regiment was patrolling in the San Bernard-Matagorda-Brazos River dis­trict. In March, 1864 Col. Likens and his unit were transferred to Gen. Richard Taylor’s Army in Western Louisiana, where it soon engaged in a dozen battles and skirmishes along the Red River, beginning with the Battle of Mansfield on April 8, 1864 and ending with the Battle of Yellow Bayou in May, 1864, and the Battle of Morganza in Sept. 1864. In Feb., 1865 the regiment was ordered back to Beaumont, where it was soon dismounted. The regiment was mustered out of service  on May 27, 1865 at Harrisburg (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Hinweis auf William Bozic, “History of the 35th Texas Cavalry Regiment;” also information furnished by Lars Gjertveit) and Col. Likens was paroled at Sabine Pass on July 12, 1865 (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O. unter Hinweis auf Informati­on furnished by Bruce S. Allardice)

 

According to the 1870 Jefferson County, TX census (page 545, res. 143), J. B. Likens was living in Beaumont as an attorney-at-law, with assets of $5,000 in real estate and $500 in personal property. His wife Salina was age 39; daughter Mary E. was age 15; and son Benjamin T. was age 13, the latter two attending school. A second son, Donald James Likens, was born in Beaumont on Dec. 18, 1868 (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Bezugnahme auf 1870 Jefferson County, TX census, p. 545, res. 143-123).

 

While a soldier in Sabine Pass, Likens had become acquainted with Capt. George W. O’Brien of Co. E, Likens Battalion, and each had come to respect one another at lawyers. O’Brien had also led his company of infantrymen at the Battles of Fordoche Bayou, Cal­casieu Pass and other battles. In 1866 Likens and O’Brien formed a legal and realty partnership, which lasted until at least 1872. Many legal ads of their firm appeared in both Neches Valley News and Beaumont News-Beacon. Certainly one of the last of those ads appeared in the News-Beacon of Jan. 6, 1872, and reads in part:  “...For sale, a plantation of 165 acres in Duncan Woods, the gar­den spot of Orange County... Cash preferred, but terms for one-half on short term can be arranged.—Likens, O’Brien and Co., Land Agents...” At least one ad of 1871 indicated that Likens was already living in Galveston (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O., unter Hinweis auf Beaumont New-Beacon, Jan. 6, 1872, at Tyrrell Historical Library; also various other issues of Neches Valley News and Beau­mont News-Beacon, 1869-1873; also W. T. Block, Emerald of the Neches: The Chronicles of Beaumont, Texas from Reconstruction to Spindletop (Nederland, 576-page unpublished typescript), p. 54).

 

While still living in Beaumont, Likens served one term in the Texas House of Representatives in 1870. Likens was also a longtime member of the Masonic Lodge. Records from the Grand Lodge indicate that he was Grandmaster of the Henderson district lodges during the 1850s, and his death was reported to the Grand Lodge by Houston’s Holland Lodge No. 1 (vgl. Block: Likens, a.a.O. unter Hinweis auf Information furnished by James E. Williams and Bruce S. Allardice)

 

So glatt wie von Block behauptet, scheint die militärische Karriere von Likens nicht verlaufen zu sein. Pvt Louis *Lehmann (Co. D, 35th Texas Cavalry) schreibt in seinem Brief 2.12.1863 an „Beloved Friederieke“ u.a.: „“[...] for when we had that night march from Sandy Point, and the 'Rehrgarde' [rear guard] (which has to chase after stragglers) came along at the back, they saw a human figure (next to a horse that was standing still) lying in a Mudhole. They pulled the man out of the mud, and o weh! They saw it was our Colonel, who was dead drunk and out cold – they left him lying there. - And when the Colonel arrived in Columbia, he was arrested [...]“ (vgl. Louis Lehmann: Brief 2.12.1863 an „Beloved Friederieke“; zitiert bei Kamphoefner/ Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 458). Kamphoefner/Helbich vermerken: „Colonel James B. Likens was accused of being drunk and unfit for duty for twenty-four hours“ (vgl. Kamphoefner/ Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 458n18 unter Hinweis auf Spencer, John W.: Terrell's Texas Cavalry, a.a.O., S. 159, 162).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Block, W. T. And J. E. Williams: „James B. Likens. Pioneer East Texas Lawyer and Military Hero; http://www.wtblock.com/ wtblockjr/Likens.htm)

 

 

Lilley, Robert D.:

CS-Captain, 25th Virginia Infantry, Brigade Early Division Ewell; 9.8.1862 Teilnahme am Battle of Cedar Mountain (vgl. Early, Me­moirs, a.a.O., S. 100). Lilley packte die Regimentsfahne und sammelte die zurück weichenden Soldaten um sich und führte sie wie­der gegen den Feind (vgl. Hotchkiss, Make Me a Map, a.a.O., S. 67).

 

 

Lilly, Eli:

US-Col, 18th Indiana Artillery

 

Photo:

- Horwitz: The Longest Raid, a.a.O., nach S. 72 Nr. A 9

 

 

Lincoln, Abraham:

1809 Kentucky - † ermordet 1865; in der Vorkriegszeit Rechtsanwalt; u.a. war er tätig für die Eisenbahngesellschaft, deren Präsident George *McClellan war (vgl. Dow­dey: The Seven Days, a.a.O., S. 20).

 

Lincoln war bei der Aufstellung des republikanischen Kandidaten für die Präsidentschaftswahl im innerparteilicher Wahlkampf der Republikaner „durchaus nicht die erste Wahl aller Republikaner des Westens. Wisconsin war unter der Führung von Schurz einstim­mig für Seward, der mächtige Weststaat Ohio hatte in Chase und Wade eigene Kandidaten und auch in Indiana war die Mehrheit der Republikaner ursprünglich gegen Lincoln“ (vgl. Kaufmann: Die Deutschen im Amerikanischen Bürgerkriege, a.a.O., S. 62 Anm. 2). Der Wahlparteitag der Republikaner trat in Lincoln's Heimatstaat Illinois in Chicago zusammen. Der bei weitem stärkste Kandidat war Gouverneur Seward von New York. Aber infolge mehrerer Glücksumstände einigte sich der Parteitag schließlich auf den Neu­ling Lincoln (vgl. Kaufmann: Die Deutschen im Amerikanischen Bürgerkriege, a.a.O., S. 62/63).

 

Lincoln erhielt bei der Wahl 1861 keine einzige Wahlmännerstimme aus den späteren Sezessionsstaaten (vgl. Foote, Shelby: Civil War, vol. I, S. 3).

 

Die Inaugurationsrede Lincoln's und dessen Amtsantritt erfolgte am 4.3.1861.

 

Lincoln und die Sklavenfrage:

- Cox, LaWanda: Lincoln and Black Freedom: A Study in Presidential Leadership (Columbia, S.C. 1981)

- Eaton, John: Grant, Lincoln and the Freedmen (New York 1907)

- Foner, Eric: Reconstruction, a.a.O., S. 5-6 (zusammenfassend)

- Frederickson, George M.: "A Man but not a Brother: Abraham Lincoln an Racial Qualität," JSH, 41 (February 1975), S. 39-58

- Hattaway/Jones: How the North Won, a.a.O., S. 5 (zusammenfassend)

 

zur voraussichtlichen Kriegsdauer:

Lincoln glaubte, im Gegensatz zu vielen Zeitgenossen, nicht an ein schnelles Kriegsende (vgl. Schurz: Reminiscenses II, S. 229).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Angle, Paul M.: "Here I haved lived": A History of Lincoln's Springfield, 1821-1865 (1935)

- Arnold, Isaac M.: The Life of Abraham Lincoln (1885)

- Barton, William E.: The Life of Abraham Lincoln (2 vols, 1925)

- Basler, Roy (Hrsg.): The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, 9 vols., New Brunswick 1953-55

- Bates, David H.: Lincoln in the Telegraph Office (New York: Century, 1907)

- Beveridge, Albert J.: Abraham Lincoln, 1809-1858 (2 vols, 1928)

- Cole, Arthur C.: "Lincoln and the American Tradition of Civil Liberty". Trans. Ill. S. H. S., 1926, 102-111

- Cole, Arthur J.: "Lincoln and the Presidential Election of 1864," Trans. Ill. S. H. S., 1917, 130-138

- Cole, Arthur J.: Lincoln's 'House Divided' Speech ... (1923)

- Cole, Arthur J.: "President Lincoln and the Illinois Radical Republicans", 4 M.V.H.R. 417-436 (1918)

- DeWitt, D. M.: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln and Its Expiation (1909)

- Dodd, William E.: Lincoln or Lee ... (1928)

- Dorris, J. T.: "President Lincoln's Clemency." 20 Jour. Ill. S.H.S. 547-568 (1928)

- Granville, D. Davis: "Factional Differences in the Democratic Party in Illinois, 1854-1858; Manuscript, Doctorial Dissertation, Univ. of Ill., 1936

- Harbison, Winfred A.: "The Opposition to President Lincoln within the Republican Party". Doctorial dissertation (ms.), Univ. of Ill., 1930

- Herndon, William H. and Weik, Jesse J.: Herndon's Lincoln, the True Story of a Great Life ... 3 vols, 1889

- Herndorn, William H. and Jesse Weik: Herndon's Life of Lincoln; DaCapo Press - Reprint of 1889 original - New introduction by Henry Steele Commager - 650 pp

- Jones, Howard: Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and the Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War (Univ Nebraska); 272 pp; Photos; Index

- Neely, Mark E. jr.: The Abraham Lincoln Encyclopedia, New York 1982 (vgl. McPherson: Für die Freiheit, a.a.O., S. 958: "enthält eine ungewöhnliche Fülle nützlicher Informationen über den Regionalkonflikt und den Bürgerkrieg)

- Nicolay, John G. und John Hay (eds.): Abraham Lincoln: Complete Works (Ventury, New York, 1894. 2 vols) (This collection inclu­des nearly 80 % of the letters and speeches printed in the enlarged edition and is quite adequate for the general reader and for most students; Anm. v. Sandberg a.a.O., S. x)

- Nicolay, John G. und John Hay (eds.): Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln (Tandy, New York, 1905. 12 vols)

- Pratt, Harry E.: The Personal Finances of Abraham Lincoln (Springfield, Ill.: The Abraham Lincoln Association, 1943

- Oates, Stephen B.: With Malice towards None. The Life of Abraham Lincoln (New York 1977)

- Randall, James G.: Lincoln the President, 4 vols (New York, 1945-55; Band 4 fertiggestellt Richard N. Current).

- Sandberg, Carl: Abraham Lincoln: The War Years (Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc: 1936); 3 vols; Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik 84/1-3

- Sparks, Edwin E. (ed.): The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858. Ill. Hist. Coll., vol. 3 (1908)

- Thomas, Benjamin P.: Abraham Lincoln (New York, 1952)

 

 

Lincoln, Charles P.:

US-Captain; Co. C 19th Michigan Infantry / Coburn's Brigade (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 10, 67). Teilnahme am Battle of Thompson's Station / Tennessee am 5.3.1863 (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 67).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lincoln, Charles P.: Engagement at Thompson's Station, Tennessee, War Paper 14, Mollus, Commandary of the District of Colum­bia, November 1893 (Mollus, District of Columbia, vol. 1, S. 211-25)

 

 

Lincoln, Mary:

Ehefrau von Abraham Lincoln; sie benutzte später das Pseudonym "Mrs. Clarke", wenn sie incognito reisen wollte (vgl. Basler: Col­lected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 7 Anm. zum Brief Lincoln's an John T. Mulford vom 9. November 1863).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Sandburg, Carl and Paul M. Angle: Mary Lincoln, Wife and Widow

 

 

Lindal, Frederick A.:

US-Sergeant; Signal Corps, US Volunteers (vgl. National Park Soldiers M1290 Roll 4)

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lindal. Frederick A.: Letter, 4 April 1865, from Frederick A. Lindal (1839-1906), a Union soldier in Richmond, Virginia, to J. L. Bugbee informing Bugbee of the Union occupation of Richmond and sending maps and other souvenirs. These maps, “A General Map of the Known and Inhabited Parts of Virginia” (map accession 438 [1947]) and “Map of the Northern Neck” (map accession 1467 [1952]), were purchased with this letter and returned to Virginia (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 21947)

 

 

Lindsay, Lewis E.:

CS-Captain; Co K 4th Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 26); gefallen in der Schlacht von 1st Manassas

 

 

Lindsay, R. H.:

CS-Col 16th Louisiana Infantry (vgl. Dicks, Confederate Veteran Vol V., S. 214)

 

 

Lindsey, D. W.:

US-Col 22nd Kentucky Infantry; eingesetzt ab Dezember 1861 in Ost-Kentucky in der 18th Brigade unter James A. *Garfield (vgl. Guerrant: Marshall and Garfield in Eastern Kentucky; in: B&L I S. 395) in der Region um Louisa am Big Sandy River (Karte Davis Nr. 141).

 

 

Lindsley, Marion W.:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 19th Regiment New York Cavalry (1st Dragoons) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 83); original filed under 'Linsley'

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lindsley, Marvin (!) W.: Letters, 1864-1865, from Marvin W. Lindsley (1844-1895), 1st New York Dragoons at Shepherdston, (West) Virginia, and Strasburg and White House Landing, Virginia, to his mother Sarah (Bearss) Lindsley in Livonia, New York. Lindsley describes the area, and comments on the weather, troop movements, battles with Gen. Jubal Early’s forces, capturing prisoners and artillery, burning grain and hay, destroying railroads near Charlottesville and Richmond, and damaging the James River and Kanawha Canal (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 42190)

 

 

Lineback, Alfred S.

auch Alfred G. Lineback; US-Pvt, Co. C, 3rd California Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M533 Roll 4).

 

 

Lineback, Benjamin:

US-Pvt, Co. G, 5th Indiana Cavalry Regiment (90th Regiment Indiana Volunteers) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44).

 

 

Lineback, C. C.:

CS-Pvt, Co. D, 57th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, Cheny M.:

US-Pvt, Co. G, 14th Illinois Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 53).

 

 

Lineback, Edward:

CS-Bugler, Co. A, 21st North Carolina Infantry Regiment; er trat als Pvt in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, E. J.:

auch James E. Lineback; CS-Sergeant; Co. K., 6th Missouri Cavalry Regiment (CS); Lineback trat als Corporal in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M380 Roll 9).

 

 

Lineback, Ferdinand:

US-Pvt, Co. I, 23rd Kentucky Infantry Regiment sowie Co. G, 27th Kentucky Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M386 Roll 16).

 

 

Lineback, Ferdinand:

US-Pvt, Co. C, 4th Ohio Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 64).

 

 

Lineback, Freedom:

US-Pvt, Co. C, 14th Illinois Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 53); originally filed under Freeman Lineback

 

 

Lineback, Henry:

US-Corporal, Co. C, 13th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment (US) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M392 Roll 9)

 

 

Lineback, Herderson:

US-Pvt, Co. K, 4th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment (US) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M392 Roll 9); originally filed under Edward H. Lineback

 

 

Lineback, Isaak E.:

US-Pvt, Co. B, 8th Indiana Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44).

 

 

Lineback, Isaak E.:

US-Pvt, Co. K, 153rd Indiana Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44).

 

 

Lineback, J. B.:

CS-Pvt, Co. B, 4th Battalion North Carolina Junior Reserves (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback (Linebach), J. H.:

CS-Sergeant; Co. K, 21st North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, J. M.:

CS-Pvt, Co. B, 4th Battalion North Carolina Junior Reserves (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, James:

US-Pvt, Co. D, 13th Missouri Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M390 Roll 29).

 

 

Lineback, James:

US-Pvt, Co. K, 52nd Ohio Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 64).

 

 

Lineback, James C.:

CS-Corporal, Co. B&C, 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment; er trat als Pvt in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M376 Roll 14).

 

 

Lineback (Linebark), John W.:

CS-Pvt, Co. K, 21st North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, John:

US-Pvt, Co. B, 4th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment (US) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M392 Roll 9)

 

 

Lineback, Joseph:

CS-Pvt, Co. B, 2nd Battalion North Carolina Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, Julius Augustus:

auch Linebach (vgl. Hess: Lee's Tar Heels, a.a.O., S. 10); 8.9.1834 Forsyth County/NC - † 21.2.1930 Winston-Salem/NC (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com); CS-Musician, Co. F&S, 26th North Carolina Infantry Regimen (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

Julius A. Lineback of Haw River and Winston-Salem, N.C., was a member of the marching band attached to the 26th North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. The collection consists of three volumes relating to Julius A. Lineback. Included are Lineback's war­time diary, about 200 pages; an expanded version of that diary, with photographs and drawings, including sketches made in the field by regimental artist, Alexander C. Meinung, materials relating to reunions and other activities of Confederate veterans, and other scrapbook material added by Lineback, probably after 1900, about 390 pages; and a third volume containing extracts from the expan­ded diary, which were published in the " Winston-Salem Sentinel" in 1914. This last volume also contains North Carolina and Confe­derate currency issued during the Civil War. In the various versions of the diary, Lineback discussed, in some detail, movements of his regiment; camp life; engagements with Federal troops, including the Battle of Gettysburg; care of battle casualties, band members also functioning as medical aids; musical activities of the band; and other related matters (vgl. http://www2.lib. unc.edu/mss/inv/l/Li­neback,J.A.html).

 

Sohn von John Henry Lineback (12.2.1796 Salem - † 10.8.1870 Winston-Salem / NC) und Elizabeth Snider (25.12.1795 bei Fried­land - † 7.7.1865 Salem); °° mit Anna Sophia Vogler Lineback (1846-1925) (vgl. http://www. findagra­ve.com).

 

Großeltern: John Leinbach (11.1.1768 Bethania, Forsyth County / NC - † 15.7.1838 Winston-Salem / NC) und Elisabeth Transou Li­nebach (2.3.1769 Bethania / NC - † 25.7.1843 Winston-Salem);

 

Urgroßeltern: Ludwig Leinbach (2.1.1743 Oley, Berks Co., PA . † 10.9.1800 Bethabara, Stokes Co, PA) und (°° 3.10.1766) Anna Barbara Lauer (geb. 12.3.1747) (vgl. geneanet.org/artner67); Johann Philipp Transou (1.11.1724 Mutterstadt/Pfalz - † 19.4.1793 Be­thania /NC) und Mary Magdalena Gander Transou (18.2.1739 in Elsaß [Grabsteinaufschrift 'Alsace'] – † 12.11.1803 Bethania / NC) (vgl. http://www. findagra­ve.com); das Ehepaar Transou / Gander ist came to North Carolina in 1762, leaving Bethlehem PA on April 20th, going on the sloop Elizabeth from Philadelphia to Wilmington NC, and from there by wagon to Bethabara, arriving on June 6th after seven weeks of travel. On July 26th they moved into a new home in Bethania (http://www.fmoran.com/transou.html).

 

2xUrgroßeltern: Johannes Leinbach (13.2.1712 Hochstadt/Wetterau – 14.3.1766 Bethania, Forsythe Co/NC) und Anna Catharina Riehm (19.1.1716 Leimen - † 5.11.1803 Wachovia, Bethania, Forsythe Co./NC); Abraham Transou (ca. 1700 Mutterstadt; ausgewan­dert in die USA ca. 1730) und (°° 1721 ref. Mutterstadt) Elisabeth Muschler (http://www.fmoran.com/transou.html).

 

3xUrgroßeltern: Johannes Leinbach (9.3.1674 Langenselbold - † 20.11.1747 Nazareth, Northampton Co. / PA) und (°° 2.10.1700 Al­tenhaßlau) Anna Elisabeth Kleiss (2.2.1680 Eidengesäß - † 25.4.1765 Nazareth, Northampton Co. / PA); Johann Eberhard Riehm (6.10.1687 Leimen – 22.8.1779 Muddy Creek, Twp, Reamstown, Lancaster Co. /PA);

 

4xUrgroßeltern: Hans Andreas Riehm (1642 Leimen - † 19.2.1719 Leimen) und Maria Werynant (ca. 1645 Leimen - † ca. 1699 Lei­men)

 

Julius Linebach had worked as a bookkeeper for the Haw River Mills in Alamance County (vgl. Hess: Lee's Tar Heels, a.a.O., S. 10).

 

Photo:

26th North Carolina Regimental Band; Photo taken durings its Salem furlough 14.7-14.8.1862. August Linebach ist der 2. von rechts; der Bandleader Samuel T. Mickey ist ganz links außen. William Henry Hall, dessen jüngster Sohn „Gussie“, kurz zuvor gestorben war, bevor die Band Salem erreichte, ist der vierte von links. Lewis Augustine Hauser ist fünfter von links vgl. Hess: Lee's Tar Heels, a.a.O., S. 31 (Photo bei http://music. allpurposeguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Salem-Brass-Band-1862.jpg).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lineback, Julius: „Extract From a Civil War Diary“. Twin Cities Daily Sentinel, 14.6.1914-3.4.1915

- Lineback, Julius Augustus: Papers, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Wilson Library, Collection No. 04547.

- Lineback, Julius Augustus: Diary, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Wilson Library, Collection No. 04547.

 

 

Lineback, Lewis C.:

US-Pvt, Co. B, 99th Indiana Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44).

 

 

Lineback, Milton:

US-Corporal, Co. F, 6th Ohio Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 64).

 

 

Lineback, Oliver:

US-Pvt, Co. H, 115th Ohio Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 64).

 

 

Lineback, Stephen:

US-Pvt, Co. C, 101st Indiana Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 44).

 

 

Lineback, W. H.:

CS-Pvt, Co. D, 57th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

 

Lineback, William:

US-Pvt, Co. I, 6th Regiment, Missouri State Militia Cavalry bzw. Co. D, 13th Missouri Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Sol­diers M390 Roll 29).

 

 

Lineback, William F.:

CS-Captain, Co. B, 4th Missouri Cavalry Regiment (CS) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M380 Roll 9); auch William T. Lineback; Wil­liam T. Lineback wird auch Captain in Co. B, Preston's Battalion, Missouri Cavalry genannt (vgl. National Park Soldiers M380 Roll 9).

 

The Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department on 23 January 1863 issued Special Orders Number 23 which ordered the consolidati­on of Preston's three mostly Stoddard County companies with Burbridge's six companies to form Burbridge's 4th Missouri Cavalry Regiment with Preston as his lieutenant colonel. McGhee tells this regiment's story and the campaigns in which they participated on pages 68 through 72 with breakdowns on companies as to who commanded them, where in general each company was recruited, and a bibliography at the end of the section. Preston's three companies became Companies A, B, and C in the 4th. From my own sources, I see that Preston's men of Companies A, B, and C were active in Stoddard, Dunklin, Reynolds, and Wayne Counties in southeast Missouri, during January, March, May, and August 1863, probably recruiting to build up unit strength (vgl. Hinweis von Bruce Ni­cols vom 26.2.2012 in http://history-sites.com, Stichwort Preston's Battalion, Missouri Cavalry; vgl. James E. McGhee's 2008 "Gui­de to Missouri Confederate Units, 1861-1865).

 

 

Lineback, William S.:

US-Pvt, 1st Regiment, Pennsylvania Light Artillery (14th Reserves) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 71).

 

 

Lionberger, John H.:

CS-2ndLt; Co. C, 39th Battalion Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 34); 20.3.1843 - † 9.8.1879; beerd. Green Hill Cemetery, Page County/VA (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 21.8.2016).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lionberger, John H.: Letter, 28 August 1864, from J. H. Lionberger (1843-1879), 1st lieutenant, Company C, 39th Virginia Cavalry Battalion, to the father of William Stevens Gibbons (1842-1931) of Harrisonburg, Virginia, informing the senior Gibbons of his son’s capture and providing details. He also asks if Mr. Gibbons could help pay money that William Gibbons owes (vgl. Library of Virginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 41448)

 

 

Lippincott, C. E.:

US-Lt, 33rd Illinois Infantry; geboren in Egypt / Illinois (?); Lippincott war Anfang 1862 in Missouri eingesetzt, und in Kämpfe (vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 15).

 

 

Lipscomb, Joseph D.:

CS-Pvt (?); Co. B, 1st Regiment Virginia Reserves (Fairnholt's) (Anm. bei National Park Soldiers nicht genannt)

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lipscomb, Joseph D.: Letter, 28 January 1865, to Joseph D. Lipscomb (1847-1886) of Company B, 1st Virginia (Farinholt’s) Reserves, from his sister Prudence G. H. Lipscomb (b. ca. 1842) and his father C. O. Lipscomb (1802-1884) containing family and personal news and admonitions to Joseph Lipscomb to do his soldierly duty (vgl. Library of Virginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 24370b)

 

 

Little, Frank L.:

CS-Pvt; Co. E, 15th Regiment Georgia Infantry (vgl. National Payrk Soldiers M266 Roll 37)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Little, Frank L. Reminiscences (1908-1911) - RG 90 [15th Georgia Infantry]

 

 

Little, George:

CS-Captain; 1864 war Little Ordonanzoffizier in Bate's Division (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 581 Anm. 25).

 

 

Little, Lewis Henry:

CS-BrigGen; 1817-1862; Little war in der Vorkriegszeit US-Berufsoffizier in 7th US-Infantry; 1861 war er beauftragt, als Muste­rungsoffizier die Indienststellung der Wisconsin Troops vorzunehmen; Little trat jedoch aus der US-Army aus und schloß sich der CSA an (vgl. Quiner, E. B.: Military History of Wisconsin, a.a.O., S. 54); er trat als Major in die CSA ein; Col und Adj. General bei Sterling Price in Missouri; Little kommandierte eine Brigade im right Wing bei Pea Ridge; BrigGen 12.4.1862; er wurde zur Beaure­gard's Army nach Corinth kommandiert und wurde Divisionskommandeur über Price' 1st Division in the Army of the West (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 485); † gef. 19.9.1862 Battle of Iuka (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 485; vgl. Quiner: Military History of Wisconsin, a.a.O., S. 54), durch eine Kugel, die zuerst unter dem Arm von General Sterling Price hindurch ging, ohne diesen zu verwunden, und Little traf (vgl. Da­vis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 1: Fort Sumter to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 320).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 1: Fort Sumter to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 320

 

 

Little, William A.:

CS-Offizier; Adjutant 14th Virginia Infantry; verdächtigt der Spionage für die CSA (OR Ser. I vol. 12/1 S. 84); Little war von Beruf Rechtsanwalt (OR Ser. I vol. 12/1 S. 87)

 

 

Little, William H.:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 73rd Regiment Illinois Infantry; von Beruf Farmer, aus Schuyler County / Illinois; 1836 Quebec/Canada - † 25.11. 1863 gef. Mission Ridge/Tennessee an gun shot wound in breast; beerd. Chattanooga National Cemetery, Chattanooga, Hamilton County / Tennessee (vgl. www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Little, William H.:

CS-Pvt; Co. I, 3rd Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 34) (= Surry Light Artillery [Hankin's Compa­ny], Virginia Light Artillery); aus Isle of Wright County / VA (vgl. Jones: Under the Stars and Bars: Surry Light Artillery of Virginia, a.a.O., S. 52); er schied im August 1862 aus Altersgründen aus, da er älter als 35 Jahre war (vgl. Jones: Under the Stars and Bars: Surry Light Artillery of Virginia, a.a.O., S. 50); Little re-enlisted erneut und trat in Co. H, 13th Regiment Virginia Cavalry ein (vgl. Jones: Under the Stars and Bars: Surry Light Artillery of Virginia, a.a.O., S. 52).

 

 

Livaudais, Edmond Emoul:

CS-Pvt; Orleans Guard Battalion, eine am 21.2.1862 in New Orleans aufgestellte Miliz-Einheit (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 61, 240); die Einheit gehörte im Battle of Shiloh zur 3rd Brigade Col Preston Pond 1st Division BrigGen Daniel Ruggles II. Army Corps Braxton Bragg in Johnston's Army of the Mississippi (vgl. Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh; in: B&L I 539)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Woods, Earl C. (ed.): The Shiloh Diary of Edmond Emoul Livaudais (New Orleans, 1992)

 

 

Livingstone, J. W.:

CS-Col; 1st South Carolina Rifles Regiment (Orr's Rifles) (vgl. Caldwell: The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians known first as "Gregg's," and subsequently as "McGowan's Brigade", a.a.O., S. 52).

 

Im Battle of Fredericksburg gehörte die 1st South Carolina Rifles zu Gregg’s Brigade, die im Rahmen von Stonewall Jackson’s Corps am 13.12.1862 auf dem rechten CS-Flügel den Durchbruch der Division Meade verhinderte (vgl. Caldwell: The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians known first as "Gregg's," and subsequently as "McGowan's Brigade", a.a.O., S. 59; Alexander: Military Me­moirs, a.a.O., S. 298-299)

 

 

Livermore, Mary:

US-Sanitary Commission in Chicago

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Livermore, Mary: My Story of the War: A Woman's Narrative of Four Years Personal Experience (Hartford, Conn., 1889)

 

 

Livermore, Thomas L.:

US-Sergeant (vgl. Nosworthy: The Bloody Crucible, a.a.O., S. 217, 228)

 

 

Lloyd, William R.:

US-Col, 6th Ohio Cavalry; kommandierte im Juli 1862 die 2nd Cavalry Brigade in Pope's Army of Virginia; Besetzung von Luray Valley und Aufklärung gegen Columbia Bridge und White House Ford, Va. am 21./22.7.1862 (vgl. Lloyd's Report OR 12 [2] S. 97-85; Karte bei Symonds, Battle Field Atlas, a.a.O., S. 38).

 

 

Lockett, Samuel H.:

CS-Major; West Point graduiert 1859, Zweiter seines Jahrgangs; in der Vicksburg Campaign im Stab Pemberton's Chief Engineer of the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana (vgl. Winschel, Triumph & Defeat, a.a.O., S. 5; Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 45 Anm. 5, 51).

 

Im Battle of Shiloh war Captain Lockett General Bragg's Chief Engineer (vgl. B&L vol. I S. 604) und war u.a mit Aufklärung beauf­tragt (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 196)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lockett, Samuel H.: "The Defense of Vicksburg," in Johnson / Buel: Battles and Leaders, vol. 3, S. 488 ff.

- Lockett, Samuel H.: "Surprise and Withdrawal at Shiloh," in: B&L vol. I, S. 604-606

 

 

Lockwood, Jonathan H.:

US-LtCol; 7th West Virginia Infantry. Im July 1863 war Lockwood Regimentskommandeur der 7th West Virginia Infantry Das Re­giment gehörte im Juli 1863 zu Samuel S. *Carrol's Brigade (*Gibraltar Brigade) und verteidigte am 2.7.1863 den East Cemetery Hill im Battle of Gettysburg.

 

 

Logan, David Jackson:

CS-+++; 17th South Carolina Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Logan, David Jackson (17th SC Vols): A Rising Star of Promise: The Wartime Diary and Letters of David Jackson Logan, 17th South Carolina Volunteers, 1861-1864 (Savas, 1998); edited by Samuel Thomas and Jason Silverman; 1st Edition, 255 pp, Photos, Il­lustrated, Maps, Index, Biblio, Notes, Biographical Roster

 

 

Logan, John:

US-Col; aus Carlinville / Illinois (vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 63); Col 32nd Illinois Infantry; Im Frühling 1862 und im Battle of Shiloh gehörte das Regiment zur 1st Brigade Col Nelson G. *Williams 4th Division BrigGen Stephen A. Hurlbutt in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 319; Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh, B & L, a.a.O., I, S. 537).

 

 

Logan, John A. "Blackjack":

US-GenMaj; aus Carbondale im südlichen Illinois (vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 63); US-Abgeordneter im Reprä­sentantenhaus; er stammt aus einer Southern Family, weshalb manche zunächst an seiner Loyalität zweifelten. Er kämpfte als Zivilist und Congress-Abgeordneter bei 1st Manassas; trat dann aus dem Congress aus und stellte ein Regiment auf (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 83). Col. 31th Illinois Infantry; verwundet im Battle of Fort Donelson (Grant, Battles and Leaders Vol. I S. 429; Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 37); Divisionskommandeur in McPherson's Right Wing von Grant's XIII Corps; Teilnah­me am Vorstoß von Bolivar, Tennessee Richtung Grand Junction, Mississippi im November 1862 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 33). Divisionskommandeur von Logan’s Division am Big Black River (Snedeker Diary v. 2.9.1863, 14.10.1863, 20.10.1863), General Logan wird kommandierender General des XVth Army Corps (Snedeker Diary v. 13.11.1863); mit diesem eingesetzt in Mc­Pherson’s Army während Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign während des Battle of Atlanta (Evans, Sherman’s Horsemen S. 77, 79); orders Gen. Garrard to relieve Sprague’s Infantry (Evans S. 200); Logan wurde entgegen der Erwartungen nicht der Nachfolger von Gen. McPherson nach dessen Tod während des Battle of Decatur (Evans S. 206); Battle of Ezra Church (Evans S. 207); Battle of Jonesbo­ro (Evans S. 469).

Logan war prominentes Mitglied der Demokratischen Partei in Illinois (vgl. Grant, Memoiren, a.a.O., S. ++++; vgl. Nevins: Ordeal of the Union, vol.: The Improvised War, a.a.O., S. 16). Abgeordneter im US-Congress (+++ Senator ? ++++). Er warnte ausdrücklich vor dem Krieg und war Anhänger von Douglas Appeasement Policy (vgl. Nevins: The Improvised War, a.a.O., S. 16; Cong. Globe, 36th Cong., 2d Session, lb. 178-181). Teilnehmer an der *Charleston Convention vom April 1860, dem Wahlkongreß der Demokra­tischen Partei zur Kandidatenaufstellung für den Präsidentschaftswahlen 1860 (Catton: The Coming Fury, a.a.O., S. 10); US-Kon­greßabgeordneter;; er trennte sich von den Democrats und wurde Mitglied der Republikanischen Partei (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 83). Logan wurde neben anderen von Präsident Lincoln zum General ernannt (vgl. McPherson: Für die Freiheit ster­ben S. 318). Der Politiker Logan wurde aus politischen Gründen zum General befördert, wurde trotz mangelnder militärischer Aus­bildung ein erstklassischer Truppenkommandeur (McPherson, a.a.O., S. 319).

 

Eine Eigentümlichkeit Logan's war, in der Schlacht höchste Bravour und Führerschaft zu zeigen, nach der Schlacht diese (auch bei einem Sieg) für verloren zu erklären; Charles *Dana (Dana, Recollections, a.a.O., S. 53/54) berichtet ein Gespräch mit Logan, nach der gewonnenen Schlacht von Champions Hill vom 16.5.1863, daß Logan nicht vom errungenen Sieg überzeugt werden konnte.

 

Logan engagierte sich in der Nachkriegszeit politisch, gründete die GAR - Grand Army of the Republic - , setzte sich intensiv für die Angelegenheiten der Veteranen, insb. wegen Pensionen für Kriegsversehrte, Witwen und Waisen, ein und würde ein führender repu­blikanischer ? +++++ Radikaler im US Congress (vgl. Zeitlin, Richard H.: In Peace and War. Union Veterans and Cultural Symbols - The Flags of the Iron Brigade; in: Nolan / Vipond, Giants with their tall Black Hats, a.a.O., S. 162; Dearing, Mary R.: Veterans in Politics: The Story of the G.A.R.; Baton Rouge 1952, S. 94; Beath, Robert B.: History of the Grand Army of the Republic with Intro­duction by Lucius Fairchild, New York 1888).

 

Photo:

- Davis/Wiley, Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 41

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Castel, Albert: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 83

- Castel, Albert: "Black Jack Logan"; in: Civil War Times Illustrated, November 1976: 4-10, 41

- Dawson, George F.: Life and Services of Gen. John A. Logan, as Soldier and Statesman (Chicago: Belford, Clarke and Co., 1887)

- Jones, James Pickett: Blackjack John A. Logan and Southern Illinois in the Civil War Era (Southern Illinois Univ Press); 314 pp; Dust Jacket; Reprint of 1967 Original; Maps; Illustrations; Biblio; Index

- Logan, John A.: The Great Conspiracy: Its Origin and History (New York, 1886)

- Logan, John A.: The Volunteer Soldier in America (Chicago 1887)

- Morris, W. S., L. D. Hartwell and J. B. Kuykendall: History 31st Regiment Illinois Volunteers Organized bei John A. Logan (Univ Southern Illinois Press, 1998; Reprint of 1902 Original); 244 pp, Illustrated. The 31st Illinois fought at Belmont, Fort Donelson, Vicksburg, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta and the March to the Sea

 

 

Logan, Stephen T.:

US-+++; Judge; aus Springfield / Illinois; Schwiegervater von Col. Ward H. *Lamon (vgl. Basler: Collected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 1-2: Brief Lincoln's an Stephen T. Logan vom 9.11.1863).

 

 

Lonergan, John:

US-Capt; 13th Vermont Infantry; Battle of Gettysburg: 2. Tag Rückeroberung der 5th US Battery aus Sickles zerschlagenem Army Corps im mittleren Frontbereich bei Codori House während des Angriffs der CS-Brigade Wright (vgl. hierzu Coffin: Nine Month to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 200 ff.; Karte bei Symonds: Gettysburg. A Battlefield Atlas", a.a.O., S. 56). Für die Rückeroberung erhielt Capt. John Lonergan von der 13th Vermont Infantry die Medal of Honor (vgl. Beyer / Keydel [eds.]: Deeds of Valor, a.a.O., S. 226-228).

 

Bei der Durchquerung des Monocacy River am 28.6.1863 auf dem Marsch Richtung Gettysburg scheute Captain Lonergan's Pferd und er fiel in den Schlamm. „Of course he was the lauging stock of the whole brigade as he lay foundering attempting to get out. The horse was finally got out live“ (vgl. Coffin: Nine month to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 179, zitiert nach Sturtevant: History of the 13rd Ver­mont Infantry, a.a.O., S. 197).

 

7.4.1839 Irland - † 6.8.1902 Montreal/Kanada; beerd. Saint Joseph Cemetery, Burlington/Vermont (vgl. www.findagrave.com).

 

Photo:

John Lonergan (vgl. www.findagrave.com)

 

 

Long, Armistead Lindsay:

CS-BrigGen; 13..1825 Campbell County, VA - † 29.4.1891 Charlottesville, VA; Sohn von Armistead Long und Calista Rosser Cralle (vgl. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armistead_Lindsay_Long); West Point 1850(17/44), Artillery; Berufsoffizier; Vorkriegszeit: Ein­satz in Florida, Frontier; Indian Wars; ver­heiratet mit der Tochter von General Edwin V. Sumner; 20.5.1861 ADC von Edwin V. Sum­ner; freiwillig aus der US-Army ausge­schieden als 1st Lieutenant am 20.5.1861; meldete sich freiwillig in West Virginia; Militärse­kretär von Robert E. Lee im Rang eines Colonel bis 20. September 1863; BrigGen am 20.9.1863; bis Kriegsende eingesetzt in Jack­son's altem Corps. Nach der Niederlage war Long als Ingenieur einer Canal Company bis 1870 tätig. 1870 erblindete er vollständig als Spätfolge der Belastungen, denen er im Krieg ausgesetzt gewesen war. Um die Familie zu versorgen, wurde seine Frau von Präsi­dent Grant zur Postmeisterin von Char­lottesville, Va. ernannt. Trotz seiner Erblindung schrieb er sein wertvolles 1886 veröffentlich­tes Werk "Memoirs of Robert E. Lee".

 

Im Battle of Gettysburg 1.-3.7.1863 gehörte Col Armistead L. Long zum Armeestab der CS-Army of Northern Virginia (vgl. B & L III S. 437 ff; vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg: The First Day, a.a.O., S. 2); Er machte am 1.7.1863 auf Befehl Lee's eine Aufklärung zu den Fe­deral Positions on Cemetery Ridge. He reported that Federals occupied the ridge in „considerable force“. In later years Long wrote Jubal Early that „an attack at that time, with the troops then at hand, would habe been hazardous and of very doubtful success“. After he made his report to Lee, Long heard no further mention of an attack that evening (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg: The First Day, a.a.O., S. 345; vgl. Long to Early, 5.4.1876, Early Papers, Library of Congress, Washington/DC; Long: Memoirs of Lee, a.a.O., S. 276-277).

 

Am frühen Morgen des 2.7.1863 erhielt Col Armistead L. Long von Gen Lee den Befehl dem Artillery Chief von Longstreet's Corps, BrigGen William N. Pendelton bei einer Erkundung von Seminary Ridge southward zu begleiten und „to examine and verify the po­sition of the Confederate artillery“ (zitiert ohne Quellenangabe bei Trudeau: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 279; vgl. Long: Memoirs of Ro­bert E. Lee, a.a.O., S. 277).

 

Photo:

Col Armistead L. Long (vgl. The Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Long, Armistead L.: Memoirs of Robert E. Lee (New York, 1886)

 

 

Long, Eli:

US-BrigGen; 16.6.1837 Woodford County / Ky. - 2.1.1903 New York; Berufsoffizier; 1856 appointed 2nd Lt US-Cavalry; eingesetzt an der Frontier; August 1861 Captain 4th US-Cavalry; Teilnahme an der Schlacht von Stone's River; Februar 1863 Col 4th Ohio Ca­valry; Tullahoma Campaign; Brigadekommandeur 2nd Brigade 2nd Cavalry Division während der Chickamauga Campaign und At­lanta Campaign; August 1864 BrigGen USV; eingesetzt bei Nashville; Divisionskommandeur 2nd Division während Wilson's Raid; Teilnahme an der Schlacht von Selma; in der Nachkriegszeit zunächst weiter Berufsoffizier; 1867 auf eigenen Wunsch ausgeschie­den; später Lawyer und Borough Recorder.

 

Photo:

- Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 283

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 283-284

 

 

Long, Stephen H.:

Major; er leitete 1823 die von der US-Regierung unterstützte erste große Expedition zur Erkundung des Westens (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the West, a.a.O., S. 6)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Nichols, Roger L. und Halley, Patrick L.: Stephen Long and American Frontier Exploration; University of Delaware Press, Newark 1980

 

 

Longfellow, Henry W.:

US-Pvt; Co. D, 10th Regiment Connecticut Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M535 Roll 10).

 

 

Longhenry, Ludolph (D):

US-Musician; Co. C, 7th Regiment Wisconsin Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M559 Roll 18). 17.10.1821 - † 26.8.1899; beerd. Hillside Cemetery, Platteville, Grant County, Wisconsin (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 15.6.2016). Geboren als Ludolph Langheinrich in Germany; Bruder von Erhart Langheinrich und Kaspar Langheinrich; Ludolph Langheinrich emigrierte 1857 in die USA (vgl. https://www.geni.com, Abruf vom 15.6.2016).

 

°° 1866 mit Wilhelmine Rogers (vgl. http://www.longhenry.com/family)

 

Photo:

- http://www.longhenry.com/family/album/ludolph.htm

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Longhenry, Ludolph: A Yankee Piper in Dixie: Civil War diary of Ludolph Longhenry, Platteville, Grant Co. Wisconsin (Towlston Grange, 1967)

 

 

Longstreet, James (Old Pete, Old War Horse):

* 1821 Edgefield District / SC - 1904); West Point 1842 (Infanterie); trat im Juni 1861 aus der US-Armee aus und wurde General der Südstaatenarmee; CS-LtGen. Vorkriegszeit: Mexiko (verwundet). Bürgerkrieg: First Bull Run, kommandierte die konföderierten Truppen in der Schlacht von Williamsburg am 5.5.1862, Seven Pines, Seven Days, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fre­dericksburg, Suffolk, Gettysburg, Bean’s Station (14.12.1863), Chickamauga, Wilderness (verwundet), Petersburg, Appomattox. Longstreet, bekannt als Lees „Old Workhorse“, wurde nach Seven Pines als „lahmer Gaul“ bezeichnet; ihm wird von einigen Histori­kern die Schuld an der Gettysburger Niederlage zugeschrieben, ... ‘was unter Virginiern ohnehin ausgemachte Sache ist’: Longstreet war einer der wenigen Nichtvirginier mit wichtigem Kommando in der Nord-Virginia-Armee. Nachkriegszeit: Versicherungsagent und bester Memoirenschreiber unter der den hohen CS-Generalen. (Längin, S. 25/26)

 

Longstreet’s Stabsoffizier während First Bull Run beschreibt sein erstes Zusammentreffen mit seinem Vorgesetzten: „Brig.-Gen. Ja­mes Longstreet was then a most striking figure, about forty years of age, a soldier every inch, and very handsome, tall and well proportioned, strong and active, a superb horseman and with an unsurpassed soldierly bearing, his features and expression fairly mat­ched; eyes, glint steel blue, deep and piercing; a full brown beard, head well shaped and poised. The worst feature was the mouth, rat­her course; it was partly hidden, however, by his ample beard. His career had not been without mark. Graduating from West Point in 1842, he was assigned to the Fourth Infantry, the regiment which Grant joined one year later. The Mexican War coming on, Longstreet had opportunity of service and distinction which he did not fail to make the most of, wounds awaited him, and brevets to console such hurts (vgl. zu Longstreet in Mexico auch: Longacre: Pickett, a.a.O., Kap. 2). After peace with Mexico he was in the In­dian troubles, had a long tour of duty in Texas, and eventually received the appointment of major and paymaster. It was from that rank and duty that he went at the call of his State to arm and battle for the Confederacy. History will tell how well he did it. He brought to our army a high reputation as an energetic, capable, and experienced soldier. At West Point he was fast friends with Grant, and was his best man at the latter’s marriage. Grant, true as steel to his friends, never in all his subsequent marvelous career failed Longstreet when there was need.“ (vgl. Sorrel, Moxley: Beschreibung des ersten Zusammentreffen mit BrigGen Longstreet)

 

 

zum Einsatz in Southside Virginia - Longstreet's Tidewater Operations [March-April 1863]

 

· Fort Anderson (NC010)

· Washington (NC011)

· Norfleet House / Suffolk (VA030)

· Hill's Point / Suffolk (VA031)

 

Longstreets Service in Southside Virginia war unauffällig, wenn nicht schändlich (vgl. Freeman: R. E. Lee, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 15). Longstreet schreibt zum Einsatz: "After the defeat of Burnside at Fredericksburg, in December, it was believed that active operations were over for the winter, and I was sent with two divisions of my corps to the eastern shore of Virginia, where I could find food for my men during the winter, and sent supplies to the Army of Northern Virginia. I spent several month in this department, keeping the enemy close within his fortifications, and foraging with little trouble and great success. In May 1st, I received orders to report to Ge­neral Lee at Fredericksburg." (vgl. Longstreet, James: "Lee in Pennsylvania"; in: Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 515).

 

Im Gegensatz zu diesen Angaben diente der Einsatz von 2 Divisionen unter Longstreet vor allem dem Schutz der Hauptstadt Rich­mond, vor allem aber der Häfen von Charleston und Wilmington sowie der Eisenbahnlinie gegen einen von Süden her geführten US-Angriff aus Suffolk, Va., Kinston und Goldsboro (vgl. Wert: Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 228). Longstreet wurde damit als Nachfolger von G. W. Smith Department Commander von South Eastern Virginia und North Carolina (vgl. Wert, a.a.O., S. 229).

 

For years many students of the war believed that Longstreet had opposed Lee's plan to invade the north in 1863. Recently some aut­horities, notably Glenn Tucker, have found evidence to the contrary, and it may well be that Longstreet has been misjudged. It is unli­kely that the controversy will eber be settled (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 368 n. 21).

 

Karte:

- Wert: Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 230

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Freeman: R. E. Lee, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 15

- Longstreet, James: "Lee in Pennsylvania"; in: Annals of the War written by Leading Participants North and South, originally publis­hed in the Philadelphia Weekly Times (Reprint The Blue and Grey Press: New Jersey 1996); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik95, S. 415

 

 

zur Strategiedebatte 1863 und zum Zusammentreffen mit CS-Secretary of War Seddon am 9.5.1863:

auf dem Weg von Southside Virginia zurück zu Lee's Army of Virginia kam es zu einem Besuch Longstreet's bei Kriegsminister Sed­don am 8.5.1863. Seddon bat Longstreet um Rat wegen der unbefriedigenden Lage im Westen bei Vicksburg. Longstreet schlug vor, mit 2 Divisionen seines Corps Gen. Bragg zu verstärken und die Offensive gegen Rosecrans zu ergreifen. Seddon hatte Longstreet's Vorschlag nicht übernommen, Longstreet kehrte zur Army of Virginia zurück, insgeheim mit Stolz geschwollen über die Ansicht, daß er der Mann sei, den sinkenden Stern der Konföderation zu retten (vgl. Freeman: R. E. Lee, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 15). Bei seinen an­schließenden Meetings mit Robert E. Lee wiederholte Longstreet seine strategische Sicht, durch eine Verstärkung Bragg's und einen Vorstoß nach Kentucky, den Feind zu zwingen, Truppen zur Verstärkung nach Kentucky abzuziehen und hierdurch eine Entlastung der Front in Vicksburg zu erzielen (vgl. Wert, Jeffry D.: "No Fifteen Thousand Men can take that position". Longstreet at Gettysburg; in: DiNardo, R. L. and Albert A. Nofi (ed.): James Longstreet, The Man, the Soldier, the Controversy (Combined Publishing: Cons­hohocken / PA, 1998); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik78, S. 79-80; ).

 

„Longstreet and others and not Lee were guilty of the poor policy .“ (vgl. Wise: The long Arm of Lee, a.a.O., Bd. 2, S. 445) zur Si­tuation im Frühjahr 1863 in der Army of Northern Virginia. Hintergrund war die Detachierung von Longstreet's Corps mit den Divi­sionen von Hood und Pickett zur Deckung von Richmond gegen den befürchteten Stoß Hooker's aus Richtung Fort Monroe und die da­mit verbundene Schwächung von Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Der Autor Wise hält Longstreet für mitverantwortliche für eine entsprechende Einflußnahme auf CS-Secretary of War, Seddon.

 

Die Strategiedebatte und Longstreet's Lagebeurteilung wird teilweise unzutreffend als Beginn des Bruchs zwischen Lee und Longstreet eingestuft; der Bruch fand vielmehr erst nach Gettysburg statt (vgl.. Wert: Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 241

 

Literatur zur Strategiedebatte:

- Freeman: R. E. Lee, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 15

- Longstreet, James: "Lee in Pennsylvania"; in: Annals of the War written by Leading Participants North and South, originally publis­hed in the Philadelphia Weekly Times (Reprint The Blue and Grey Press: New Jersey 1996); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik95, S. 415-16

- Longstreet, James: Lee's Invasion of Pennsylvania; in: Battles and Leaders III S. 244-46

- Longstreet, James: Letter to Lafayette McLaws vom 25. Juli 1873 in: Lafayette McLaws Papers, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina (SHC/UNC)

- Wert, Jeffry D.: "No Fifteen Thousand Men can take that position". Longstreet at Gettysburg; in: DiNardo, R. L. and Albert A. Nofi (ed.): James Longstreet, The Man, the Soldier, the Controversy (Combined Publishing: Conshohocken / PA, 1998); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik78, S. 79-80

 

 

zur Longstreet-Kontroverse wegen Lee's Angriff bei Gettysburg:

" The transfiguration of James Longstreet's historical image from scapegoat to Confederate hero has been remarcable. Until the 1974 publication of Michael Shaara's 'Killer Angels', most Civil War enthusiasts and historians saw James Longstreet as a villain. He was disloyal, Lee's Judas, a man who lost Gettysburg because of his seditious ways, and thus the South's best chance for independence. This damning interpretation surfaced in the 1870's with the Lost Cause writings of Jubal A. Early and William N. *Pendleton. Their criticism drew not so much from Longstreet's battlefield performance, but from their postwar criticisms of Lee and his allegiance to the Republican Party. In many ways, Longstreet was his own worst enemy. He wildly exaggerated his contributions to the Army of Northern Virginia, often at the expense of Lee and his fellow officers. He even characterized Lee as a general who relished a good bloodletting on the battlefield. .. Confederates of all ranks eagerly joined the Longstreet witch-hunt, waging a bitter and malicious campaign that ultimately destroyed the general's military record. Only a few ex-Confederates challenged the anti-Longstreet crusade. Next to the famous First Corps artillerist Edward Porter Alexander (vgl. Alexander, Edward Porter: Fighting for the Confederacy. The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander. Edited by Gary W. Gallagher [Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989], Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik82) Gilbert Moxley Sorrel stands as Longstreet's most important defender." (Carmichael, Pe­ter S.: Introduction zu Sorrel: "At the right hand of Longstreet", a.a.O., S. vii).

 

Bereits in einem Brief vom 24.7.1863 an seinen Onkel A. B. Longstreet äußerste Longstreet eine ablehnende Haltung gegenüber Lee's Feldzugsplan. Longstreet teilt seine strategische Ansicht mit: "My idea was to throw ourselves between the enemy and Wa­shington, select a strong position, and force the enemy to attack us" (vgl. Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 414).

 

vgl. hierzu zusammenfassend: Coddington: Gettysburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 9 ff mit S. 601n14

 

 

Einsatz bei Chickamauga und Knoxville 1863 / 1864:

im September 1863 wurde Longstreet mit zwei Divisionen nach Nord-Georgia verlegt; Teilnahme am Battle of Chickamauga; an­schließend ging Longstreet mit 20000 gegen Knoxville / Tennessee vor, wurde jedoch geschlagen. Vor einem anschließend erfolgen­den Vorrücken von US-Truppen wich Longstreet nach Osten Richtung Virginia aus. Im Januar 1864 stellten seine auf 12000 Mann reduzierten Truppen, unterversorgt und durch die Winterkämpfe verschlissen, keine Gefahr für die linke Flanke der US-Truppen in Tennessee um Knoxville dar (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 18). Grant, damals Kommandeur der Division of the Mis­sissippi, dem dieser Zustand von Longstreet's Truppen nicht bekannt ist, setzte die Army of the Ohio mit 20000 Mann unter dem Kommando von MajGen John G. Foster auf Longstreet's Truppen an, um Longstreet endgültig aus Tennessee zu vertreiben. Foster stieß zum French Broad River vor, sah sich jedoch wegen unzureichender Versorgung und der Wetterbedingungen gezwungen, den Vorstoß abzubrechen und nach Knoxville zurückzukehren. Grant löste daraufhin Foster, auf eigenen Wunsch wegen einer Beinverlet­zung, ab und ersetzte ihn durch MajGen John M. Shofield (Castel, a.a.O., S. 19; OR 2: 99-101, 105, 143, 183-84, 192-93, 208, 229-30).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Longstreet, James: "Lee in Pennsylvania"; in: Annals of the War written by Leading Participants North and South, originally publis­hed in the Philadelphia Weekly Times (Reprint The Blue and Grey Press: New Jersey 1996); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik95, S. 415-16

 

 

Literatur zu Longstreet allgemein:

- **Alexander, Edward Porter: Fighting for the Confederacy. The Personal Recollections of General Edward Porter Alexander. Edited by Gary W. Gallagher (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989)

- **DiNardo, R. L. and Albert A. Nofi (ed.): James Longstreet, The Man, the Soldier, the Controversy (Combined Publishing: Consho­hocken/PA, 1998)

- **Frey, Donald J.: Longstreet's Assault - Pickett's Charge. The lost Record of Pickett's Wounded (White Mane: Shippensburg, 2000)

- **Longstreet, Helen D.: Lee and Longstreet at High Tide: Gettysburg in Light of the Official Records (Gainesville, Ga.: privately printed by the author, 1904)

- **Longstreet, James: From Manassas to Appomattox (Reprint der Originalausgabe: J. P. Lippincott Comp., 1895)

- **Longstreet, James: "Lee's Invasion of Pennsylvania"; in: B & L, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 244-251

- Longstreet, James: „Lee's Left Wing at Gettysburg,“ in B&L 3:340

- **Longstreet, James: „General Longstreet's Account of Gettysburg.“ Philadelphia Weekly Times, Nov. 3, 1876

- **Piston, William Garrett: Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant. James Longstreet and His Place in Southern History (The University of Geor­gia Press: Athens and London, 1987)

- **Sorrel, Moxley: Gen G. Moxley Sorrel C.S.A. - Recollections of a Confederate Staff Officer (New York, 1905, Reprint 1999)

- **Wert, Jeffry D.: General James Longstreet, the Confederacy's Most controversial Soldier: A Biography (New York, 1993)

- **Wert, Jeffry D.: "No Fifteen Thousand Men can take that position". Longstreet at Gettysburg; in: DiNardo, R. L. and Albert A. Nofi (ed.): James Longstreet, The Man, the Soldier, the Controversy (Combined Publishing: Conshohocken/PA, 1998), S. 77-98

 

 

Look, Oliver:

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Look, Oliver: Papers (Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield / Illinois)

 

 

Loomis, Gustavus:

ca. 1789- 1872; US-Col US-Army); US-Berufsoffizier, seit 1851 Col 5th US Inf; er musterte 1861 Volunteers in Connecticut und Rhode Island (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 491), darunter am 5.6.1861 die 2nd Rhode Island Infantry (vgl. Rhodes, Elisha Hunt: All for the Union, a.a.O., S. 6).

 

 

Looney, R. F.:

CS-Col: Col 38th Tennessee Infantry; das Regiment gehörte im Battle of Shiloh zur 3rd Brigade Col Preston Pond 1st Division Brig­Gen Daniel Ruggles II. Army Corps Braxton Bragg in Johnston's Army of the Mississippi (vgl. Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shi­loh; in: B&L I 539); die Einheit verlor in Shiloh 90 Casualties (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 312).

 

 

Lord, Edward:

US-+++; 9th New Hampshire Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lord, Edward: History of the Ninth New Hampshire Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion (Old Books Publishing, Reprint of 1895 Original), 935 pp. Organized at Concord in August 1862, the 9th NH fought at Fredericksburg, Petersburg, Antietam, South Moun­tain, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Antietam and other major battles. Noted for storming the Stone Bridge at Antietam and the heights at Fredericksburg, it was one of the first to enter the Crater at Petersburg. POW experiences, Biographical Sketches

 

 

Loring, Frederick:

US-Captain, 22nd Missouri Infantry (vgl. Lowry, Tarnished Eagles, a.a.O., S. 170).

 

 

Loring, William Wing:

CS-BrigGen; Loring stammte aus North Carolina; Teilnahme am Mexikokrieg, wo er seinen linken Arm verlor; Berufsoffizier US-Army; Einsatz an der Frontier; seit 1856 jüngster Col der US-Army (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 66); im März 1861 als US-Col. Kommandeur im US-Militärbezirk New Mexiko (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 36); Loring trat am 13.5.1861 aus der US-Army offiziell aus, blieb aber in Erwartung der Bestätigung seines Entlassungsgesuchs durch das Kriegsministerium in Washington loyal und harrte bis dahin auf seinem Posten als Kommandeur in Santa Fe aus (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 37); wie ein Brief Sibley's verdeutlicht, wurden allerdings von Loring Pläne erwogen, seine Truppen und Einrichtungen der CSA zuzuspielen (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 38; OR I, 4 S. 55); erst am 11.6.1861 schloß er sich den CSA an; sein Kommando übergab er ordnungsgemäß an LtCol Canby, nachdem Unionisten in Santa Fé sich immer deutlicher gegen ihn stellten; die Hoffnungen der Sezessionisten, Loring werde die ihm unterstellten Truppen, militärische Liegenschaften und Vorräte an die CSA übergeben, erfüllte er nicht (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 37).

 

Im Juli 1861 Einsatz bei der Cheat Mountain Campaign (vgl. Shelby Foote, Civil War Bd. 1 S. 129; Taylor: Four Years with General Lee, 16, 20 ff.; Worsham, John H.: "One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry; a.a.O., S. 27; Karte bei Freeman: R. E. Lee, vol. 1, S. 549; vgl. Freeman, a.a.O., S. 550-51). Lorings's Truppen bei Valley Mountain (Angabe nach Taylor, S. 22) umfaßten, stark durch Krankheiten geschwächt (vgl. Worsham, John H.: "One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry; a.a.O., S. 29) 3500 Mann, bestehend aus:

- Brigade BrigGen D. S. Donelson (1 North Carolina Rgt., 2 Tennessee Rgt)

- Brigade Tennessee Truppen unter BrigGen Anderson

- Brigade Col. William Gilham (21st Virginia Infantry, 42nd Virginia Infantry, Irish Battalion [Provisional Army of Virginia)

- Commando Colonel Burk Cavalry Battalion Major W. H. F. Lee

 

Kommandeur der Army of the Northwest im Spätjahr 1861- Frühjahr 1862, bestehend aus den Brigaden Taliaferro, Gilham, Ander­son, Shumaker's sowie Marye's Batteries und Meem's Command (OR 5: 390). Im Dezember 1961 - Januar 1862 Teilnahme mit seiner Army an Jackson's Expedition nach Bath und Romney (vgl. Douglas: I rode with Stonewall, a.a.O., S. 19), dabei Teilnahme an Jack­son's Angriff auf Bath und Romney, ohne daß Loring's Truppen denen Jackson's unterstellt gewesen wären. Jackson informierte den dienstälteren aber rangniedrigeren Loring in keiner Weise über seine Absichten, was zu schweren Zusammenstößen zwischen beiden führte, wobei Loring beim Angriff auf Bath am 3. Januar 1862 Gegenbefehle gegen Anordnungen Jackson's gab (vgl. Tanner: Stone­wall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 71 m.w.N.). Jackson erhob deshalb schwere Vorwürfe bei CS-Secretary of War Benjamin gegen Loring (vgl. OR , 5: 390, 1065-1066), die Loring zurückwies (OR 5: 1070-71).

 

Nach der Eroberung von Bath und Romney befürchtete Jackson einen Vorstoß in seinen Rücken durch US-Truppen von Maryland aus Richtung Winchester und das Shenandoah-Tal. Er beließ deshalb Loring's Truppen in Bath und Romney und zog seine eigene Stonewall Brigade mehr als 30 Meilen nach Winchester zurück. Hiergegen gab es offenbar Proteste von Offizieren Loring's mit des­sen Unterstützung beim Secretary of War (unter Einhaltung des Dienstweges über Jackson; vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 81; Henderson: Stonewall Jackson, a.a.O., S. 147). Zugleich meldete die in Leesburg / Va. stehenden CS-Truppen unter BrigGen D. H. *Hill ver­stärkte US-Aktivitäten am Potomac, die auf einen Vorstoß von Norden nach Zentral-Virginia und zugleich in den Rücken von Jack­son's Valley Army schließen ließen, bzw. auf einen Angriff aus Harper's Ferry ins Shenandoah-Tal (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Val­ley, a.a.O., S. 81). Secretary Benjamin gab daraufhin (auf Anweisung von Präs. Davis) am 25.1.1862 Jackson ohne vorherige Konsul­tation den Befehl, Loring's Truppen ebenfalls nach Winchester zurückzuziehen, da diese bei Romney von US-Truppen bedroht seien (vgl. McDonald: Laurel Brigade, a.a.O., S. 37; Tanner, a.a.O., S. 81), was jedoch falsch war (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 83; Henderson: Stonewall Jackson, a.a.O., S. 150 ff.). Zu den Hintergründen gibt es unterschiedliche Darstellungen. Während McDonald die Ent­scheidung des War Departments nur kurz erwähnt, stellt Douglas (Douglas: I rode with Stonewall, a.a.O., S. 24 f) den Briefverkehr dar, aus dem sich intensive Auseinandersetzungen offenbaren. Die Anordnung des War Departments beantwortet Jackson mit seinem Entlassungsgesuch (Schreiben Jackson's an Benjamin vom 31.1.1862, abgedruckt bei Tanner, a.a.O., S. 82 und bei Henderson, a.a.O., S. 152). Jackson befürchtete, daß ein Rückzug aus Bath und Romney einen konzentrischen Angriff des Feindes auf das Shenan­doahtal zur Folge haben werde, wenn die vorgeschobene Front bei Romney wegfalle (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 87). Einflußreiche Hono­ratioren aus dem Shenandoah-Tal, wie Col. A. *Boteler und Governor John *Fletcher unterstützten Jackson (vgl. Henderson, a.a.O., S. 155), da sie mit seinem Ausscheiden aus dem Dienst, den Verlust des Shenandoah-Tals befürchteten (vgl. den bei Douglas, a.a.O., abgedruckten Briefverkehr). Seinen politischen Freunden gelang es, Jackson zur Rücknahme seines Rücktrittsgesuch zu veranlassen.

 

Jackson war über Loring derart verärgert, daß er in einem Brief an Boteler vom 12.2.1862 die Absetzung Loring's forderte (vgl. Dou­glas, a.a.O., S. 27). Anschließend erhob Jackson gegen *Gilham und *Loring Anklage vor dem Kriegsgericht. Im Kern laufen Jack­son's Vorwürfe gegen beide darauf hinaus, bei Herannahen des Feindes nicht energisch vorgegangen zu sein. Der gemeinsame Vorge­setzte Joseph E. Johnston unterstützte Jackson's Beurteilung, da er die völlig ungenügenden Zustände und Disziplinlosigkeiten bei Loring's Truppen in Romney kannte (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 84). Die Eröffnung des Kriegsgerichtsverfahrens wurde von Präsident Davis persönliches Einschreiten verhindert, der zur Vermeidung weiterer Auseinandersetzungen die Versetzung von Loring und Gil­ham veranlaßte und Loring's Beförderung zum MajGen durchsetzte (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 85).

 

Loring wurde nach Norfolk beordert. Er hatte hier und an anderen Orten mehrere Kommandos inne, die er ohne besonderen Erfolg oder Engagement betrieb. Nach dem Fall von Norfolk war Loring Kommandeur der Army of Southwest Virginia, mit der er wenig ausrichtete. Dann wurde er in den tiefen Süden versetzt, wohin ihm sein schlechter Stern folgte. John C. Pemberton beschuldigte Lo­ring, dieser habe die Niederlage bei Champion's Hill verursacht (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 85). Divisionskommandeur (Loring's Divisi­on) unter dem Kommando von Joseph E. Johnston während der Vicksburg Campaign (vgl. Smith: Compelled to Appear in Print: The Vicksburg Manuscript of General John C. Pemberton, a.a.O., S. 200 u.a.); im Nov/Dez 1862 während Grant's Vormarsch aus dem Norden von Grand Junction über Holly Springs Richtung Vicksburg war Loring in Grenada / Miss eingesetzt (vgl. Johnston: Military Operations, a.a.O., S. 153; vgl. hierzu Karte und Zusammenfassung bei Symonds: Battlefield Atlas, a.a.O., S. 68/69).

 

Loring führte 1864 während der Atlanta Campaign 1864 eine Division und für kurze Zeit ein Korps und befand sich mit bei der Army of Tennessee bei deren Auflösung bei Nashville im Spätjahr 1864 (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 85).

 

 

Lormer, James Cordin:

US-+++; 103rd New York Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lormer, James Cordin: Diary 1.1.1864-24.1.1865 (VMI-Archive)

 

 

Lothrop, Charles H.:

US-Surgeon; Co. F&S, 1sr Regiment Iowa Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M541 Roll 16).

 

Literatur:

- **Lothrop, Charles H.: A History of the First Regiment Iowa Cavalry Veteran Volunteers. Lyons, Iowa, 1890

 

 

Loudon, De Witt Clinton:

US-+++; 70th Ohio Infantry (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 131); Daniel gibt fehlerhaft an, Loudon sei Col gewesen (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 131); die Angabe ist allerdings falsch, im Battle of Shiloh war Col Joseph R. *Cockerill Regimentskommandeur der 70th Ohio Infantry (vgl. Grant, U. S.: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh; in: B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 538; DeHaas, Wills: Battle of Shiloh; in Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 681; Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 171).

 

Im Frühjahr 1862 und im Battle of Shiloh gehörte die 70th Ohio Infantry unter Col Joseph R. Cockerill zur 4th Brigade Col Ralph P. *Buckland 5th Division BrigGen William T. Sherman in Grant's Army of the Tennessee (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 320, 131)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Loudon, De Witt Clinton.: Letters (Ohio Historical Society, Columbus / Ohio)

 

 

Loughlin, William Morgan:

US-1stLt; Co. C, 96th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 54); später Captain 1st U.S. Vet. Vol. Engi­neers.

 

23.8.1824 Quebec/Canada - † 20.8.1913 Chicago/Illinois; beerd. Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum Chicago; °° mit Isabelle Jane Miller Loughlin (1834-1909) (vgl. www.findagrave, Abruf vom 15.5.2016).

 

Photo:

- vgl. Partridge: History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment Ill. Vol. Inf., a.a.O., 624n: William Morgan Loughlin als Captain 1st U.S. Vet. Vol.

 

 

Love, Henry B.:

CS-Pvt; aus Madison Station /Madison County / Alabama; Pvt Co. F 4th Alabama Infantry (vgl. Penny / Laine: Struggle for the Round Tops, a.a.O., S. 18). Love wurde während des Krieges dreimal verwundet und wurde im Februar 1865 zu 4th Alabama Caval­ry versetzt (vgl. Penny / Laine, a.a.O., S. 202 Anm. 55).

 

 

Lovejoy, Elijah P.:

US-Abolitionist; Illinois; Mitkämpfer von William Lloyd Garrison und Wendell Philipps; Buchdrucker in Alton, Illinois; Lovejoy wurde in Alton, Illinois 1837 ermordet, als er versuchte seine abolitionistische Druckerei gegen einen Mob von Leuten zu verteidi­gen, die glaubten, seine Aktivitäten würden den Frieden der Stadt gefährden (vgl. Randall: Civil War and Reconstruction, a.a.O., S. 102).

 

 

Lovell, David V.:

US (?)-+++

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lovell, David V.: Letters, Coco Collection, USAMHI

 

 

Lovell, Mansfield:

CS-MajGen; er stammte aus Washington / DC; er schloß sich nach der Besetzung von New Orleans den CS-Truppen Earl Van Dorn's an; MajGen Lovell kommandierte kunstvoll die CS-Truppen beim Rückzug nach der Schlacht von Corinth im Oktober 1862 (vgl. Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 1: Fort Sumter to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 325).

 

Nach der Schlacht von Corinth reorganisierte der Kommandeur der CS-Army of the Mississippi MajGen Earl Van Dorn die Armee um; es wurden zwei Army Corps gebildet, von denen Lovell ein Korps kommandierte (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol I S. 45). Lovell's Corps stand Ende November 1862 an der Tallahatchie Linie im Raum Abbaville / Mississippi und verteidigte den Raum östlich der Mississippi & Tennessee Railroad von der Mündung des Tippah Creek bis Rocky Ford. Das Corps bildete den lin­ken Flügel von Pemberton's CS-Army of the Mississippi. Am 30.11.1862 ordnete Pemberton den Rückzug an, bedingt durch die Be­drohung seiner rechten Flanke durch den Vorstoß der US-Truppen aus dem Raum *Delta / Mississippi. Lovell zog sein Corps be­fehlsgemäß über den Yocona River zurück (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol I S. 75 mit Karte S. 56).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 1: Fort Sumter to Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 325

- Milhollen / Kaplan: Divided We Fought, a.a.O., S. 91

 

 

Lowe, James M.:

CS-Musician; Co. I; 2ne Regiment Georgia Infantry; er trat als Pvt in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M266 Roll 37); °° mit Evaline Missouri Rushin (Photo bei Frassanito: Antietam Photographic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 100); Schwager von Pvt George W. *Rushin ( Co. A, 3rd Regiment Georgia Cavalry), von Sergeant Thomas Jefferson *Rushin (Co. K, 12th Regiment Georgia Infantry)

 

 

Lowe, John R.:

US-Captain; Co. F&S, 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry; Lowe trat als Corporal in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 65); später Captain Co. H, 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 68).

 

Captain John R. Lowe (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 68)

 

 

Lowe, Samuel:

CS-Col. 28th North Carolina Infantry, gewählt im Herbst 1862 als Nachfolger von Col. James Henry *Lane; verwundet in Gettysburg am 3.7.1863 (vgl. Speer, a.a.O., S. 52 Anm. 15)

 

Photo:

- Speer, a.a.O., S. 34

 

 

Lowe, T. S. C. Professor:

 

Bei McClellan's Vorstoß über den Potomac nach Süden Anfang November 1862, bestand eine großes Bedürfnis nach Aufklärung durch Lowe's Ballons. Professor Lowe returned to the army. By posting a balloon on Bolivar Heights at Harper's Ferry, an elevation of 1200 feet, Lowe was able to look down at the enemy's positions at Martinsburg/VA, 13 mi in the Northwest [Anm.: der Potomac fließt von Nordwesten nach Südosten, weshalb Harper's Ferry und due US-Truppen der Army of the Potomac südöstlich von Mar­tinsburg standen]. But the country was too hilly for dependable aerial observation; the Confederates' move toward Winchester hid them from Lowe's telescopes. With long marches in Virginia now in prospect, McClellan sent Lowe back to Washington; the balloons and their gas generators again would be unable to keep up with a marching army (vgl. Fishel: Secret War, a.a.O., S. 251).

 

Am 4.6.1863 observers in baloons near Banks' Ford reported“the disappearance of two camps on the Confederate left“ (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 33) am Beginn der Gettysburg Campaign.

 

Photo:

- Milhollen / Kaplan: Divided We Fought, a.a.O., S. 58, 59

 

 

Lowell, Charles Russell:

US-BrigGen; 2.1.1835 Boston - 20.10.1864 Cedar Creek; Neffe des Dichters James Russel *Lowell; Studium in Harvard, das er als Bester seiner Klasse 1854 abschloss; anschließend mehrjährige Auslandsreisen; Bei Kriegsausbruch Manager einer Eisengießerei in Massachusetts; 14. Mai 1861 Captain 3rd US Cavalry (später umbenannt in 6th US Cavalry); Teilnahme an der Peninsula Campaign in der 3rd US Cavalry; gegen Ende der Campaign in der Stab von MajGen George B. *McClellan versetzt. Beim Battle von Antietam zeichnete sich Lowell durch große persönliche Tapferkeit aus, als er im dichtesten Feuer fliehende Truppen sammelte; er wurde da­durch ausgezeichnet, daß er ausgewählt, bei der US-Truppenparade in Washington die erbeuteten CS-Fahnen zu tragen. Im August 1862 stellte Lowell die 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry auf; 10.5.1863 Col 2nd Massachusetts Infantry; Im Winter 1863 / 1864 befehligte er die äußeren Verteidigungen von Washington / DC, und war im Juli 1864 an der Abwehr von Jubal Early's Raid beteiligt. ++++

 

Photo:

- Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 284

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 284-85

 

 

Lowell, Charles Russell:

US-Col; 3rd New Jersey Cavalry; Teilnahme am Battle of Waynesborough am 28.9.1864 (vgl. Nosworthy: Bloody Crucible, a.a.O., S. 255).

 

 

Lowell, James Russel:

US-Dichter und 'Pundit' aus Boston (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 5).

 

 

Lowell, Oliver H.:

US-Captain;Co. F&D, 16th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 13); † kia 1.7.1863 Gettysburg (vgl. Gettysburg Commission: Maine at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 77).

 

 

 

Lowie, Henri:

US-Journalist; Campaign Artist der illustrierten Wochenzeitung Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper (vgl. Andrews: The North re­ports the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 103).

 

 

Lowrance, C. W.:

CS-Corporal Co. G&D, 30th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M376 Roll 14)

 

 

Lowrance, George W.:

CS-Corporal, Co. E, 37th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24); auch George W. Lawrance

 

 

Lowrance, James W.:

CS-Pvt, Garber's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Staunton Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 34)

 

 

Lowrance, John W.:

CS-Pvt Co. G, 58th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24); 1862 from 5 (Palmer's) Battalion N.C. Partisan Rangers. Consolidated April 9; Rank In Note - 1865 with 60 N.C. Infantry

 

 

Lowrance, W. H.:

CS-Pvt, Co. E, 8th Regiment, Texas Infantry (Hobby's) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 22)

 

 

Lowrance, W. J.:

CS-Pvt, Co. C, 12th Tennessee Infantry Regiment (CS) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M231 Roll 26)

 

 

Lowrance, W. W.:

CS-Pvt, Co. F, 38th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24)

 

 

Lowrance, William W.:

CS-Pvt, Co. B, 30th Mississippi Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M232 Roll 24)

 

 

Lowrance, W. Lee J.:

CS-Col. ++++ 22nd North Carolina Infantry; Scale's Brigade; Scales' Brigade bildete zusammen mit der Brigade Lane's (bei von Pender's Division) die zweite Linie während des Angriffs auf Cemetary Ridge / Battle of Gettysburg (Pickett's Charge) am 3.7.1863 eingesetzt hinter Pettigrew's (Heth's) Division (vgl. Wilson: Pettigrew, a.a.O., S. 67; Coddington: The Gettysburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 490; Karte bei Wilson, a.a.O., S. 68). Scales Brigade wurde von Col W. L. J. Lowrance geführt, nachdem Scale vor Gettysburg verwundet worden war.

 

 

Lowrie, Houston B.:

CS-Captain, Co. C, 6th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24).

 

1839, Mecklenburg County / NC - † 17.9.1862 gef. im Battle of Sharpsburg/Antietam. Houston was one of four sons of Samuel and Mary Johnston Lowrie. The family resided about 17 miles Northwest of Charlotte on The Beatties Ford Road. All four of the sons volunteered for service in the Confederate Army. Captain Patrick Johnston *Lowrie died of yellow fever in Wilmington, NC, Hou­ston died at Antietam, Lt. James Lowrie died at Gettysburg and only Samuel Lowrie survived the war, dying in Florida, 1892. Hou­ston B. Lowrie enlisted at age 22 on May 16, 1861, and appointed Adjutant with the rank of 1st Lt. to rank from May 20, 1861. Wounded and captured at Seven Pines. Promoted to Captain in June 1862. Killed at Sharpsburg, MD, September 17, 1862. Captain Houston B. Lowrie of Company C, known as the Orange Grays, of the 6th North Carolina Infantry, was killed during Colonel Evan­der Law's charge through the Cornfield on the morning of 17.9.1862 (aus http://www.findagrave.com)

 

Photo:

Captain Houston B. Lowrie (aus http://www.findagrave.com)

 

 

Lowrie, James B.:

CS-1stLt, Co. H, 11th Regiment North Carolina Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24). † gef. 3.7.1863 Get­tysburg. James B. Lowrie was one of four sons of Samuel and Mary Johnston Lowrie. The family resided about 17 miles Northwest of Charlotte on The Beatties Ford Road. All four of the sons volunteered for service in the Confederate Army. Captain Patrick John­ston *Lowrie died of yellow fever in Wilmington, NC, Houston *Lowrie died at Antietam, Lt. James Lowrie died at Gettysburg and only Samuel Lowrie survived the war, dying in Florida, 1892 (aus http://www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Lowrie, Patrick Johnston:

CS-Captain and Commissary of Subsistance; Co. H, 11th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 24). 3.1.1832 Mecklenburg County / NC – 12.7.1862 Wilmington / NC am Gelbfieber; beerd. Bethlehem Cemetery, Ansonville/NC. . Patrick Lowrie was one of four sons of Samuel and Mary Johnston Lowrie. The family resided about 17 miles Northwest of Charlotte on The Beatties Ford Road. All four of the sons volunteered for service in the Confederate Army. Captain Patrick Johnston *Lowrie died of yellow fever in Wilmington, NC, Houston *Lowrie died at Antietam, Lt. James Lowrie died at Gettysburg and only Samuel Lowrie survived the war, dying in Florida, 1892 (aus http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Die Grabsteininschrift lautet: „Capt. P.J. of the 11th Bethel Regt. N.C 7 born in Mechlenburg Co. N.C Jan 3, 1832 died at Wilimgton S.C. July 12th 1862 In the service of his Country“ (aus http://www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Lowry, Richard H:.

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 30th Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 27).

 

Lowry starb am 31.12.1862 bei einem Zugunglück eines Truppentransports zur Front bei Vicksburg; der zum Transport eingesetzte Zug verunglückte; es gab 5 Tote, darunter Richard H. Lowry (vgl. Moore, Sue Burns: „1862 Confederate Troop Train Wreck at Ed­wards“; vgl. New Orleans Times-Picayune, January 9, 1863 und New Orleans Bee, January 7, 1863).

 

 

Lowther, Alexander A.:

CS-Major; zunächst Captain Co A 15th Alabama Infantry

 

 

Lubbock, Thomas S.:

CS-Col; er stellte zusammen mit Col. Benjamin F. *Terry das als Terry's Texas Rangers bekannte Regiment auf, die 8th Texas Caval­ry. Die Truppe rekrutierte sich i.w. aus Angehörigen der *Texas Rangers (vgl. Boatner, The Civil War Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 833 Stich­wort Texas Rangers); Col. Terry war der erste Regimentskommandeur; er fiel 1861 in Kentucky (vgl. Confederate Veteran Vol. I 1893, S. 111); Terry und Lubbock dienten während 1st Manassas als Scouts und Amateur-Krieger (Ruffin Diary II 60); sein Bruder war der Gouverneur von Texas; Lubbock führte zum mit Terry im Stab von Gen Longstreet wichtige Aufklärungsunternehmen durch; nach 1st Manassas kehrte er mit Terry nach Texas zurück, wo Terry das Regiment Terry's Texas Rangers aufstellte (vgl. Ruffin, Diary II 60 Anm. 5).

 

 

Luby, Timothy:

US-Major; Co. C&F, 15th Regiment New York Engineers (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 18; vgl. Annual Report of the Ad­jutant-General of the State of New York for the Year Roster 15th Regiment New York Engineers, S. 38); Age, 23 years. Enrolled, May 9, 1861, at New Yor k city; mustered in as ensign, Co. B , June 17,1861, to serve two years; first lieutenant, date not stated'; captain,,Go. F , Apri l 11, 1863; transferred to Co. C, June 18, 1863; mustered in as major, May 30,1865; mustered out, June 14,1865; commissioned ensign, Jul y 4, 1861, with rank from June 25,1861, vice Wood, promoted; first lieutenant, October 24, 1861, with rank from October 19,1861, vice J . P. Wood, Jr. , promoted; captain, March 5, 1863, with rank from February 21, 1863, vice Garrett, resigned; major, May 29, 1865, with rank from 29.4.1865 (vgl. Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for the Year Roster 15th Regiment New York Engineers, S. 38).

 

Captain „Ludley of the 15th New York Engineers wird im Zusammenhang mit dem Bau einer Pontonbrücke über den Rappahannock während des Battle of Chancellorsville am 28.4.1863 genannt (vgl. Bigelow: Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 174). Es habndelt sich wohl um ein Schreibversehen; im Roster der 15th New York Eginners gab es keinen Soldaten dieses Namens.

 

 

Lucas, George W.:

US-Pvt; Co. B&C, 3rd Regiment Missouri Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M390 Roll29; hier als 'George N.' bezeichnet).

 

Pvt George W. Lucas erhielt am 1.12.1864 die Medal of Honor für seinen Einsatz bei Benton: „Pursued and killed Confederate Brig. Gen. George M. Holt, Arkansas Militia, capturing his arms and horse." (vgl. National Park, Medal of Honor Recipients, George W. Lucas).

 

 

Lucas, Thomas John:

US-BrigGen; 9.9.1826 Lawrenceburg / Indiana - 16. November 1908 ebd.; Vorkriegszeit Uhrmacher; Teilnahme am Mexikokrieg; Regimentskommandeur 16th Indiana Infantry, 10th Division Andrew J. Smith, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Cam­paign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 402). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 402).

 

 

Luce, C.:

US-LtCol; 1863 Regimentskommandeur 17th Michigan Infantry (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg III 1145)

 

 

Luce, Sullivan:

US-Pvt; 5th Battery, 1st Battalion Maine Light Artillery („E“) († 3.7.1863 Gettysburg) (vgl. Gettysburg Commission: Maine at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 102).

 

 

Ludley, Captain:

s. Captain Timothy *Luby

 

 

Lum, Charles L.:

US-Col; 10th Michigan Infantry

 

1864 gehörte die 10th Michigan zu First Brigade BrigGen James D. Morgan, 2nd Division BrigGen Jefferson C. Davis, XIV Army Corps MajGen John M. Palmer, in MajGen George H. Thomas Army of the Cumberland (vgl. B & L, vol. IV, S. 285). Teilnahme am durch MajGen Thomas’ Army of the Cumberland geführten Ablenkungsangriff gegen Rocky Face Ridge und Buzzard Roost Gap nördlich Dalton am 24.-26.2.1864 während Sherman’s Meridian Campaign; hierbei verlor das Regiment 60 Mann innerhalb weniger Minuten (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 54). Das Regiment, das bald darauf seinen lange gewährten Urlaub antrat, kehr­te am 15.5.1864 zur Army of the Cumberland zurück (B&L, a.a.O., 4:285 n 9).

 

 

Luse, William H.:

CS-LtCol; 1862 im Battle of Fredericksburg Regimentskommandeur der 18th Mississippi Infantry, Barkdale's Brigade (vgl. McLaws, Lafayette: The Confederate Left at Fredericksburg; B&L 3:87); das Regiment war eingesetzt auf dem rechten Flügel der Skirmish-Li­nie von Barkdale's Brigade unterhalb der Mündung des Deep Rum in den Rappahannock auf der Höhe der unteren Ponton-Brücken (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., 2:334 Anm. 44; 2: 335; OR 21: 186, 604); 3 Kompanien waren zusammen mit LtCol Fiser's 17th Mississippi Infantry in der Stadt Fredericksburg eingesetzt (vgl. McLaws, Lafayette: The Confederate Left at Fredericksburg; B&L 3:87).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Sifakis, Stewart: Compendium of the Confederate Armies: Mississippi (Facts On Line, Inc.: New York, 1995); Bibliothek Ref Mi­lAmerik145, S. 102

 

 

Lusk, William J.:

US-Pvt; Co. E, 76th Regiment New York Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 85).

 

 

Lusk, William Thompson:

US-Captain; im Juli 1861 war Lusk 1st Lieutenant in der 79th New York Infantry (vgl. Davis: Battle of Bull Run, a.a.O., S. 99; vgl. Catton: Glory Road, a.a.O., S. 32 mit 351 Anm. 17).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lusk, William C. (ed.): War Letters of William Thompson Lusk (New York: privately printed, 1911)

 

 

Lye, Henry:

US-Sergeant; Co. G 1st US-Sharpshooters (Berdan’s Sharpshooters); zunächst Bugler in the Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M1290 Roll 2); † kia 1./3.7.1863 Gettysburg (vgl. Stevens: Berdan’s US-Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, a.a.O., S. 344).

 

 

Lyle, John Newton:

CS-1stLt; Co. I ("Liberty Hall Volunteers"), 4th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 35; vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 58).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lyle, John N.: Lyle Recollections. Recollections (entitled1986)

- Lyle, John Newton: „Stonewall Jackson's Guard: The Washington College Company.“ Special Collections, Leyburn Library, Washington and Lee University, Lexington/VA

 

 

Lyman, H. H.:

US-Lt; 147th New York Infantry (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 627n348).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lyman, H. H.: Letter to John B. Bachelder, n.d.; in Bachelder Papers, New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, New Hampshire

 

 

Lyman, Joseph:

CS-+++; aus New Orleans; Confederate Guards Response Battalion, eine Militia-Einheit aus New Orleans (II. Army Corps MajGen Braxton Bragg 1st Division BrigGen Daniel Ruggles 2nd Brigade BrigGen Patton Anderson); Teilnahme am Battle of Shiloh (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 61, 121, 388); Louisiana-Governor Thomas O. *Moore stellte auf Anforderung von Beauregard vom 21.2.1862 ca 1500 Mann Militia auf, die für 90 Tage mit Zustimmung des CS-War Departments eingezogen wurden; die Truppen umfaßten die Washington Artillery (5th Co.), Orleans Guard Artillery, Orleans Guard Battalion, Crescent Regiment und Confederate Guards Response Battalion (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 61).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lyman, Joseph: Letters (Yale University Library, New Haven, Connecticut)

 

 

Lyman, Theodore:

US-Col; 1833-1897; aus Massachusetts; Studium in Harvard, anschließend Tätigkeit als Naturforscher; Volunteer ADC von MajGen George Meade während des Krieges . In der Nachkriegszeit erneut als Forscher tätig in der Konservierung von Fisch und der Ent­wicklung von aus Fisch hergestellten Nahrungsmitteln; zeitweilig Abgeordneter im US-Congress und tätig in der Reform des Civil-Service (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 496).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lyman, Theodore (edited by George R. Agassiz): Meade's Headquarters, 1863-1865, Letters of Colonel Theodore Lyman (Boston: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1922)

- Lyman, Theodore: With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (Univ Nebraska Press; Reprint of 1922 Original), 371 pp, Illustrations, Maps

 

 

Lynde, Isaac:

US-Major; 1861 bei Kriegsbeginn Kommandeur von Fort Fillmore / NMT; 1861 unter *Canby eingesetzt in NMT (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 38 ff); zur Verteidigung von Fort Fillmore und dem Skirmish von Mesilla am 24.7.1861 vgl. Josephy, a.a.O., S. 44 ff.; US Maj. Isaac Lynde (500) zieht gegen Oberst John R. *Baylor (280) bei Mesilla/NMT (Karte in: The official military Atlas, Plate CLXXI) den kürzeren. Am 27.7.1861 füllen Lynde's Yankees füllen ihre Feldflaschen mit Whisky, eva­kuieren Fort Fillmore/NMT und fallen den Reitern der 2. Texas Mounted Rifles südlich von Augustine Springs buchstäblich in die Hand. Fort Fillmore muß durch unglaubliche Unfähigkeit oder Verrat Lynde's geräumt werden und wird von CS-Truppen unter Lt. John R. Baylor besetzt (vgl. Alberts: Battle of Glorieta, a.a.O., S. 6). Lynde wurde auf persönliche Anordnung von Präsident Lincoln unehrenhaft aus der Army ohne weitere Untersuchung entlassen, 1866 auf Intervention von General Grant (Grant war Schwipp­schwager von Lynde) wurde die Anordnung widerrufen und Lynde ehrenvoll pensioniert (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the Ameri­can West, a.a.O., S. 48).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Alberts: Battle of Glorieta, a.a.O., S. 6

 

- Josephy: The Civil War in the American West, a.a.O., S. 43

ff

- Hall, Martin Hardwick: "The Skirmish at Mesilla," in: Arizona and the West, Vol 1 Nr. 4 (Winter 1959), S. 347

- McKee, James C.: Narrative of the Surrender of a Command of US Forces at Fort Fillmore, NM, in July, 1861 (Stagecoach Press: Houston, 1960)

- Pettis, George H: The Confederate Invasion of New Mexico and Arizona; in: Battles and Leaders, Vol. 2 S. 103 ff

 

 

Lyon, Henry C.:

US-Lt; 34th New York Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lyon, Henry C.: Desolating the Fair Country: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Lt Henry C. Lyon, 34th New York (McFarland Pub); 208 pp, Maps, Photos, Biblio, Notes, Index, Roster

 

 

Lyon, Hylan B:

CS-Colonel 8th Kentucky Cavalry; Lyon deckte mit seinem Regiment den CS-Rückzug auf Vicksburg nach der Niederlage bei Champion's Hill am 16.5.1863; später gelang ihm die Flucht aus der belagerten Stadt-Festung Vicksburg.

 

Photos:

Davis/Wiley, Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 33

 

 

Lyon, Nathaniel:

US-BrigGen; * 1818 Ashford/CT - 1861 im Battle of Wilson's Creek; West-Point 1841 (Infanterie); Vorkriegserfahrung: Seminolen, Frontier, Mexiko, Bleeding Kansas (dort eingesetzt 1856 nach Ende des Wakarusa War zusammen Lt James McIntosh, seinem späte­ren Gegner in Missouri, woher er die gute Ortskenntnis des Grenzgebiets zwischen Kansas und Missouri hatte, die für das Battle of Wilson's Creek von Bedeutung war [vgl. Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 16]). Bürgerkrieg: Camp Jackson, Booneville, Dug Springs, Wilsons Creek (10.8.1861; tödlich verwundet).

 

Bei Kriegsbeginn ist er als US-Hauptmann in St. Louis; mit seiner Hilfe werden 20000 Musketen des Bundesarsenals St. Louis über den Mississippi nach Illinois verbracht und dem CSA-Zugriff entzogen (Längin S. 38; vgl. hierzu auch Ortsglossar St. Louis, sowie Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 35; Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 124: Grant war z. Zt. des Angriffs auf Camp Jackson in St. Louis anwesend).

 

In den beginnenden Auseinandersetzung in Missouri soll Porter von Harrisburg aus Truppen nach Missouri entsandt haben und die Ernennung von Capt. Nathaniel Lyon in St. Louis durchgesetzt haben (vgl. Eisenschiml, a.a.O., S. 24-25).

 

Lyon wurde von den neu aufgestellten Freiwilligenregimentern zum BrigGen der Missouri Volunteers gewählt und von Präsident Lincoln am 17.5.1861 für die US-Army bestätigt (Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 35; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 498; aA Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 85: Beförderung erst am 31.5.1861)

 

Nachdem die CS-Militia 'Camp Jackson' errichtete und mit Waffen und Ausrüstung (aus dem US-Depot in Baton Rouge, Louisiana getarnt herantransportiert mit dem Dampfer 'J. C. Swan'; vgl. Otto C. *Lademann) soll Lyon selbst verkleidet als Schwiegermutter von Francis *Blair die Lage in Camp Jackson erkundet haben (vgl. Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 56 mit Anm. 7 S. 244).

 

Am 10.5.1861 schließt Lyon mit 720 Berufssoldaten und Freiwilligen Camp David ein und zwingt CS BrigGen. Daniel Frost zur Übergabe. Lyon wird nach dem Schachzug von *Camp Jackson (10.5.1861) zum BrigGen ernannt (Gemälde bei Längin, S. 55). Am 27.4.1861 löste Capt. Lyon zunächst vorübergehend den bisherigen KomGen William S. *Harney an der Spitze des US-Wehrbereichs West ab. Harney wurde zwar kurz darauf erneut in sein Amt eingesetzt, jedoch aufgrund einer Weisung Lincoln's am 30. Mai 1861 endgültig entlassen und Lyon zum seinem Nachfolger ernannt (vgl. Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 76-77; Catton: The Coming Fury, a.a.O., S. 387).

 

Lyon, der mit konspirativen Charakterzügen ausgestattet war, gelang es, unter Täuschung der aufständischen Bevölkerung, 25000 moderne Infanterie- und andere Waffen, aus dem größten Militärdepot des Südens abtransportieren zu lassen. Jackson bemächtigte sich des Polizeiapparats in St. Louis und forderte militärische Unterstützung bei Jefferson Davis an. Lyon seinerseits stockte das Bun­desheer um mehrere Regimenter auf, die von der deutsch-amerikanischen Bevölkerung, dem Kern der Unionistenbewegung, gestellt wurden. Es gelang ihm 700 Milizsoldaten samt deren Artillerie in Camp Jackson gefangenzunehmen, wobei er die Aufklärung seines Unternehmens als Frau verkleidet selbst vornahm. Während die Miliz in Camp Jackson widerstandslos kapitulierte, kam es in St. Louis zum Aufruhr, der von den Truppen blutig niedergeschlagen wurde (vgl. Snead, Thomas L.: The First Year of the War in Missour­i; in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, ed. Robert U. Johnson and Clarence C. Buel. 4 vols. New York, 1884-1887, Vol. I, S. 265: "One of Lyon's German regiments opened fire upon them, and twenty-eight men, women and children were killed. ... the shoo­ting down of .... unoffending men, women and children aroused the state."). Einige Tage später besetzte Lyon die Hauptstadt Jef­ferson City. Miliz und Parlament flüchteten flußaufwärts in das 50 Meilen entfernte Booneville, von wo sie Lyon nach einem Schar­mützel vertreiben konnte. Auf ihrem weiteren Rückzug zur Staatsgrenze wurden die Sezessionisten von Lyon energisch verfolgt. Lyon wurde der erste Kriegsheld des Nordens. Ohne nennenswerte Hilfe von außen hatte er eine Armee aufgestellt, ausgerüstet und ge­schult, hatte die ersten bedeutenden Siege für die Union erzielt und den Großteil Missouris in seine Gewalt gebracht (McPherson, S. 277-279). Hieran konnte auch die anschließenden Guerilla-Kämpfe nichts mehr ändern.

 

Lyon ist in der Schlacht von Wilson's Creek (10.8.1861) gefallen. vgl. zur Kritik an Lyon und zur fehlenden Notwendigkeit verfrüht die Entscheidungsschlacht in Wilson's Creek zu suchen: Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 38-39 (Anm.: Schofield war unter Lyon Stabschef und Adjutant-General).

 

Pope, der Lyon persönlich kannte, schildert ihn aufgrund seines Wesen und seines Fanatismus für die Union als "schlafenden Vulkan" (Pope: Military Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 8; zur Kritik und Charakterisierung von Lyon: vgl. auch Catton: Terrible Swift Sword, a.a.O., S. 11 und Catton: The Coming Fury, a.a.O., S. 373-87).

 

"Lyon was a small man, lean, active, sleepless. He was not an old man, although he had wrinkles on the top of his nose. He had a look of incredulity; he did not believe things. ... I never liked him, nor did any of us as far as I could see, but we did believe that he was a brave and educated officer. He struck us also as a man devoted to duty, who thought duty, dreamed duty and had nothing but duty on his mind" (Ware, E. F.: The Lyon Company in Missouri, Being a History of the First Iowa Infantry [Topeca, Kansas, 1907], S. 339-40)

 

Ein kritischeres Bild über den Einsatz von Lyon und Blair in Missouri gibt Catton: Terrible Swift Sword, a.a.O., S. 10-13. Catton ver­tritt die Meinung, daß trotz des pro-südlich eingestellten Gouverneurs Claiborne Jackson der Staat Missouri voraussichtlich bei der Union verblieben wäre. Erst die illegalen Aktivitäten von Lyon und Blair hätten zum Ausbruch des Krieges in Missouri geführt. Nach dem Amtsübernahme von Frémont sei zudem die Stärke der prosüdlichen State Guard übertrieben und die Zahlenangaben mit 25000 Mann verdoppelt worden. Auch sei St. Louis keine 'Rebel City' gewesen (Catton, a.a.O., S. 12). Lyon habe mit seinen Aktio­nen in ein Hornissennest gestochen, das ihn anschließend zu überwältigen drohte (Catton, a.a.O., S. 13; vgl. Britton, Wiley: Civil War on the Border, 2 vols, New York 1890, vol. I S. 72-73, 75, 77).

 

Lyon ist offensichtlich zu unvorbereitet und mit zu geringen Kräften vorschnell vorgegangen. Seine Hilferufe um Verstärkung blie­ben von Frémont unbeantwortet. Im Sommer 1861 erhielt Frémont falsche Informationen des Geheimdienstes über einen bevorste­henden Angriff der Konföderierten auf Cairo. Die Stadt wurde im Juli und August 1861 von BrigGen Benjamin M. *Prentiss vertei­digt, der kaum mehr als 600 einsetzen konnte. Die fehlerhafte Lagebeurteilung führte dazu, daß Frémont seine geringen vorhandenen Verstärkungen in Cairo konzentrierte und deshalb die erforderliche Verstärkung von Nathaniel *Lyon nicht vornehmen konnte, was zum Verlust der Schlacht von Wilson's Creek führte (vgl. Catton: Terrible Swift Sword, a.a.O., S. 14).

 

Photo:

- Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., nach S. 114 (Zeichnung)

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History of the Civil War, vol I, a.a.O., S. 74, 283

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Adamson, Hans Christian: Rebellion in Missouri: 1861 Nathaniel Lyon and His Army of the West (New York: Chilton Company, 1961)

- Britton, Wiley: Civil War on the Border, 2 vols, New York 1890, vol. I S. 72-73, 75, 77

- Brooksher, William R.: Bloody Hill: The Civil War Battle of Wilson's Creek (Brassey's: Washington / London, 1995, 1st Edition); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik86

- Holcombe and Adams: An Account of the Battle of Wilson's Creek or Oak Hill (Springfield, Mo., 1883)

- Ingenthron, Elmo: Borderland Rebellion (Branson, Mo.: The Ozark Mountaineer, 1980)

- Kemp, Col. Hardy A.: About Nathaniel Lyon, Brigadier General, United States Army Volunteers, and Wilson's Creek (published by the Author, 1978)

- Lademann, Otto C.: The Capture of "Camp Jackson" St. Louis, 1914

- Lyon, Adelia C., comp. Reminiscences of the Civil War: Compiled from the War Correspondence of Colonel William P Lyon and from Personal Letters and Diary by Mrs. Adelia C. Lyon. San Jose, Calif: Press of Muirson & Wright, 1907

- OR III, S. 394-97 (zur Stärke von Lyon's Truppen und seinen Hilferufen um Verstärkungen; Brief Lyon's an Frémont kurz vor der Schlacht von Wilson's Creek; Frémont erhielt ihn erst nach Lyon's Tod, vgl. Catton: Terrible Swift Sword, a.a.O., S. 15)

- OR III, S. 394-97 (zur Stärke von Lyon's Truppen und seinen Hilferufen um Verstärkungen)

- Philipps, Christopher: Damned Yankee: The Life of Nathaniel Lyon. Columbia / Missouri 1990

- Price, Capt. Richard Scott: Nathaniel Lyon: Harbinger from Kansas (Springfield, Mo.: The Wilson's Creek National Battlefield Foundation, 1990)

- Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 32 ff.

- Shea, William L. und Hess, Earl J.: Pea Ridge. Civil War Campaign in the West.", 1992, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik14, S. 1-3, 28, 345 (n. 11)

- Snead, Thomas L.: The First Year of the War in Missouri; in Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, ed. Robert U. Johnson and Cla­rence C. Buel. 4 vols. New York, 1884-1887, Vol. I, S. 263-277

- Ware, Eugene Fitch: The Lyon Campaign in Missouri, Being a History of the First Iowa Infantry (Topeca, Kansas, 1907; Reprint Iowa City: Press of the Camp Pope Bookshop, 1991); Eugene Fitch Ware war Private im 1st Iowa Infantry); one of the 3 month re­giments, the 1st Iowa fought in Missouri, distinguishing itself at Wilson's Creek. They were nicknamed the "Iowa Greyhounds" for their long marches. Ware went on to become a Sergeant Major and finally Captain in the 7th Iowa Cavalry

 

 

Lyons, Richard Bickerton Pemell:

1817-87; britischer Botschafter in Washington

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Monaghan, Jay: Diplomat in Carpet Slippers (Boobs-Merrill Comp: New York 1945)

 

 

Lytle, Alfred D.:

US-Photograph; aus Baton Rouge (vgl. Davis / Wiley, a.a.O., S. 794); seine Kunst überstieg diejenige der meisten Photographen des Westens (vgl. Davis/Wiley, a.a.O., S. 65).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History. Vol: 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 65, 317, 318, 349, 794, 799

 

 

 

 

Aktuelles

Homepage online

Auf meiner  Internetseite stelle ich mich und meine Hobbys vor.

 

 

Besucher seit 1.1.2014