Version 6.4.2017

 

Litera L (La-Le)

 

Lacy, Drury Jr.:

CS-Adjutant; Co. F&S, 43rd North Carolina Infantry Regiment, er trat als Pvt in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22); zunächst CS-Pvt, Co. B, 1st Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (6 months, 1861) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22); Sohn von Rev. Drury Lacy Sr. und Williana Wilkinson Drury; älterer Bruder von Singleton Wilson *Lacy Jr. (vgl. http://www. findagra­ve.com).

 

 

Lacy, George H.:

CS-Pvt, Co. F, 27th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22). 29.12.1838 Perquimans County, NC - † 24.2.1923 Raleigh, Wake County / NC; beerd. Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh/NC (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Lacy, Singleton Wilson:

CS-Pvt; Co. B, 43rd North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22). 16.1.1845 Raleigh Wake County/NC - † 24.8.1862 bei Petersburg/VA, beerd. Oakwood Cemetery, Raleigh, Wake County/NC (vgl. http://www.Findagrave. com). Sohn von Rev. Drury Lacy Sr. und Williana Wilkinson Drury; jüngerer Bruder von Drury *Lacy Jr. (vgl. http://www. findagra­ve. com).

 

Singleton Wilson Lacy was born 1845 in Raleigh, Wake, County, NC, the youngest of 7 known surviving children (5 boys/2 girls) born to the Rev. Drury Lacy II and his (1st) wife, Williana Wilkinson (1806-1846). He was the paternal grandson of Rev. Drury Lacy Sr. & Ann "Nancy Anna" Smith of Virginia, and later Philadelphia; and gr-grandson of William Lacy & Katherine Rice of New Ha­nover, Co. VA. He was a direct descendant of this family's patriarch, Thomas Lacy I (ca. 1649-1750) who immigrated to the Virgina Colonies from Wales ca. 1680. On his mother's side, he was the paternal grandson of William Wilkinson & Elizabeth Smith of Din­widdie Co, VA. Raised in Raleigh where his father was pastor of the Presbyterian Church, Singleton was an infant when his mother died of tuberculosis. At about age 4 his father remarried to Mary Ritchie Rice, who became a loving and beloved stepmother to the young man. Singleton was just 16 years old when Civil War came to North Carolina. He enlisted with his brother Drury in the NC 43rd out of Mecklenburg County with the rank of Private. Singleton died of typhoid fever on August 24, 1862 while in service near Petersburg, VA. He was less than 18 years old (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

„Died, of typhoid fever on the 24th August, Singleton Wilson Lacy, son of Rev. Dr. Lacy, 17 years, 17 months. He was a member of the 43rd Regiment, N.C.T.“ (vgl. North Carolina Standard Raleigh September 10, 1862).

 

 

Lacy, John T.:

CS-Pvt, Co. A, 2nd North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22).

 

 

Lacy, T. E.;

auch Thomas E. Macy, CS-Pvt, Co. I, 28th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22).

 

 

Lacy, William S.:

CS-Chaplain, 47th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 22); auch genannt als CS-Pvt,
A. Graham's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Rockbridge Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 32)

 

 

Ladd, George H.:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 23).

 

22.1.1839 Deerfield, Rockingham County/New Hampshire - † gef. 1.7.1862 Battle of Malvern Hill/VA; beerd. Ladd Cemetery, Deerfield/New Hampshire (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 26.7.2016; dort ist die Regimentszugehörigkeit nicht genannt; vgl. Bennett: Musket and Sword, a.a.O., S. 70-71, der den Tod von Ladd beschreibt: „My head rested [in einer grabenähnlichen Vertiefung während eines CS-Angriffs] upon a foot of George H. Ladd. I soon heard him groan, and rising up saw that he had been hit near the shoulder and was insensible. […] We removed him him a few feet , to what must have been his last resting place unless the enemy buried him elsewhere“). S. v. Daniel Ladd (1796-1839) und Martha Clemmons Ladd (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 26.7.2016).

 

 

Ladd, George H.:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 42nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (100 days, 1864, Militia) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 23).

 

10.4.1832 Connecticut - † 9.11.1900 West Boylston, Worcester County/Massachusetts; beerd. Mount Vernon Cemetery, West Boylston, Worcester County/Massachusetts (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 26.7.2016).

 

 

Ladd, Lewis A.:

US-2nd Corporal (vgl. Eldredge: Third New Hampshire Infantry, a.a.O., S. 878); Pvt, Co. K, 3rd Regiment New Hampshire Infantry; er trat als Corporal in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M549 Roll 7).

 

Geboren in Tuftonboro, age 22. res. Milton, O.V., enl. 6 Aug. 01, must, in 24 Aug. 01, must, out 23 Aug. 64, res d 3 May 03, O.D. P.O. ad. Farmington (vgl. Eldredge: Third New Hampshire Infantry, a.a.O., S. 878).

 

 

Lademann, Otto:

US-Capt 3rd Missouri Infantry; Lademann war seit April 1861 zunächst Private in Col. Sigel's 3rd Missouri Infantry und beteiligt an der Einnahme von *Camp Jackson durch Nathaniel Lyon im Mai 1861 in St. Louis. Lademann hatte zuvor im Auftrag von Franz *Si­gel die Ladung des Schiffes J. C. Swan erkundet (vgl. Lademann. Otto C: The Capture of "Camp Jackson" St. Louis, 1914), das Waffen für die Sezessionisten nach St. Louis geschmuggelt hatte (vgl. Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 55).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lademann, Otto C.: The Capture of "Camp Jackson" St. Louis, 1914

 

 

Ladley, Charles:

US-Pvt; 75th Regiment Ohio Infantry (vgl. Gottfried: Brigades of Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 301, 316; Anm. nicht bei National Park Soldiers genannt). Es handelt sich wohl um eine V

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Becker, Carl M. and Ritchie Thomas (eds.): Hearth and Knapsack: The Ladley Letters, 1857-1880 (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1988)

 

 

Ladley, Oscar D.:

US-Captain; Co. G,H,E, 75th Regiment Ohio Infantry; er trat als First Sergeant in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552, Roll 61) . zuvor Pvt; Co. E, 16th Regiment Ohio Infantry (90 days) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 61).

 

Local resident Oscar Ladley enlisted as a private in the Union Army at the start of the Civil War. He eventually was promoted to first lieutenant of Company G, 75th Ohio, and was one of only two 75th Ohio officers at Gettysburg to escape the battle unharmed. After the War he was 1stLt, 22nd US-Infantry (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 13.10.2016).

 

25.9.1840 Ohio - † 11.1.1880 Farmington, New Mexico (died of pneumonia), buried Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 13.10.2016). He was originally buried in the Post Cemetery at Fort Lewis, Colorado. At some later date his remains were re-interred in the Fort Leavenworth National Cemetery.

 

Photo:

- findagrave.com: Lt Oscar D. Ladley

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Becker, Carl M. and Ritchie Thomas (eds.): Hearth and Knapsack: The Ladley Letters, 1857-1880 (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1988)

 

 

LaGrange, Oscar Hugh:

US-BrigGen; zunächst ab 2.7.1861 Captain Co. B, 4th Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M559 Roll 17; vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 469); Major 1st Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry (10.12.1861); LtCol (12.6.1862); Col (5.2.1863); Bvt BrigGen USA. Commanded 2,1, Cav. Corps (Cumberland); 2,1, Cav. Corps, Mil. Div. Miss. (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 469).

 

LaGrange's Cavalry Brigade in McCook's Cavalry Division (vgl. Starr, Union Cavalry in the Civil War, Vol. III, The War in the West, a.a.O., S. 294, 349, 353, 542, 565); LaGrange führte mit seiner Brigade den Angriff auf Wheeler's Cavalry während des Ge­fechts bei *Varnell's Station (vgl. Cox, Sherman's Battle for Atlanta, a.a.O., S. 38/39); dabei wurde Col. LaGrange bei Popular Place gefangen genommen (weshalb er in der Folge bei der Gliederung von McCook's Division während der weiteren Atlanta Campaign nicht mehr erwähnt wird; vgl. Evans: Sherman's Horsemen: Gliederung von McCook's Division, a.a.O., S. xi).

 

 

Laibold, Bernard:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 2ne Regiment Missouri Infantry; er trat als LtCol in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M390 Roll 28).

 

während der Pea Ridge Campaign im Februar 1862 Regimentskommandeur 2nd Missouri Infantry in 1st Brigade Col Fre­derick *Schaefer 2nd Division BrigGen Alexander S. *Asboth in Samuel R. *Curtis Army of the Southwest (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 332). Am 4.3.1862 stand das Regiment als einzige US-Einheit isoliert südlich von Sigel’s Truppen, die Stellungen bei McKissick’s Creek / Bentonville / Arkansas bezogen hatten, bei Osage Mill / Arkansas (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 60, Karte bei Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 40).

 

 

Laing, C. W.:

US-Lt; Battery B 2nd Michigan Artillery (Captain William H. *Ross Battery).Während der Shiloh Campaign im Frühjahr 1862 ge­hörte die Battery unter Führung von Lt C. W. Laing zur 4th Division BrigGen Stephen A. Hurlbutt in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee. Teilnahme am Battle of Shiloh am 6.4.1862. Die Battery von Captain William H. Ross (Battery B 2nd Michigan Artillery) bezog Stellung in der Front von 1st Brigade Col Nelson G. *Williams 4th Division BrigGen Stephen A. Hurlbutt (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 192).

 

 

Lake, Lewis F.:

US-Pvt; Battery A&B, 1st Regiment Illinois Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 51).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Lake, Lewis F.: “My War Service as a Member of Taylor’s Battery, Company B, 1st Illinois Light Artillery (Manuscript, Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield / Illinois)

 

 

Lakeman, Moses B.:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 3rd Regiment Maine Infantry; zuvor Captain Co. I (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 12).

 

 

Lamar, Charles A. L.:

CS-Sklavenhändler; Eigner des Sklavenschiffs "Wanderer". Lamar gründete in den 1850er Jahren ein Syndicat, das mehrere Schiffe nach Afrika entsandte, um dort Sklaven einzukaufen. Der Sklavenhandel mit Afrika war jedoch illegal; der Sklavenhandel war seit 1807 durch Bundesgesetz verboten, Sklavenschmuggel wurde jedoch in kleinem Rahmen fortgesetzt (vgl. McPherson: Für die Frei­heit, a.a.O., S. 93). Eines der Schiffe war der schnelle Schoner "Wanderer", der 1858 eine Ladung von 500 Afrikanern an Bord nahm. Mit den 400 Überlebenden, die in Georgia ankamen, machte Lamar erheblichen Gewinn. Die US-Regierung ließ Lamar und mehrere Besatzungsmitglieder, darunter John Egbert *Farnum, in Haft nehmen, und die Wanderer und den Gewinn beschlagnahmen. Ein Ge­schworenengericht in Savannah / GA sprach Lamar jedoch frei (McPherson: Für die Freiheit, a.a.O., S. 93; vgl. zu den Einzelheiten: Nevins: Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 435-37 m.w.N). Lamar kaufte die Wanderer auf einer öffentlichen Versteigerung zu­rück und betrieb seinen Sklavenhandel weiter bis zum Bürgerkrieg, in dem er an der Spitze seines Regiments ++++ fiel (vgl. Mc­Pherson: Für die Freiheit, a.a.O., S. 94; s. auch *Farnum, John Egbert).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- McPherson: Für die Freiheit, a.a.O., S. 94

- **Wells, Tom Henderson: The Slave Ship Wanderer, Athens, Ga., 1967

 

 

Lamar, L. M.:

CS-Col; 8th Georgia Infantry; im April 1862 gehörte die 8th Georgia zu Col George T. *Anderson Brigade in J. Bankhead *Magru­der’s Division; Einsatz auf der Virginia Peninsula und im Battle of Dam Nr. 1 bei Lee’s Mill am 16.4.1862 (vgl. Magruder’s Report OR 11.1 S. 407).

 

 

Lamar, Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus:

CS-Col und CS- Politiker (++++weiteres s. Chestnut, Diary, a.a.O., S. 70)

 

 

Lamar, Tom:

CS-Colonel; Kommandant der Artillerie-Batterie bei Cumming’s Point bei der Beschießung von Fort Sumter (vgl. Benson, Susan: Berry Benson’s Civil War Book, MilAmerik6 S. 2).

 

 

Lamb, John:

CS-Captain; Co. D, 3rd Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 32)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lamb, John: Manuscript draft, 1898, of an address by John Lamb entitled “The Confederate Cavalry: Its Wants, Trials, and Heroism.” Lamb discusses the inability of the Confederate government to supply horses to its troops, the reorganization of the cavalry and lack of manpower, arms, and equipment, the cavalry battle at Fleetwood Hill in Culpeper County, Virginia, and he laments on how little has been written concerning the contributions of the cavalry soldier. Address was published in the Southern Historical Society Papers (1898), pp. 359-365 (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 41008, Miscellaneous reel 5228)

- Lamb, John: „The Confederate Cavalry“, Southern Historical Society Papers (SHSP) 26 (1898)

 

 

Lamb, John Calhoun:

CS-Col; zunächst Captain, dann LtCol, Co. A. 17th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (2nd Organization) (vgl. National Park Sol­diers M230 Roll 22).

 

21.12.1834 - † 20.5.1864 Hospital Petersburg/VA nach tödlicher Verwundung im Battle Ware Bottom Church bei Bermuda Hundred (vgl. www.findagrave.com).

„Church John Calhoun Lamb, businessman, Confederate regimental officer, and a war casualty, was born in Camden County, the ol­dest child of Wilson Gray and Eliza Williams Lamb. His paternal grandparents, Mary and Gideon Lamb were cousins; Gideon, a for­mer state senator, was the son of Luke Lamb who was a brother of Gideon Lamb, a colonel in the Revolution. After his schooling at the acade­my near his home in Elizabeth City, John Lamb acquired a hotel in Williamston and established a merchandising business which in­cluded West India trade. Several of his vessels were captured by Federal forces during the early part of the Civil War.

When Roanoke Island fell, Lamb enlisted with his father and two of his brothers,Wilson Gray, Jr., and Gideon; the father soon con­tracted rheumatism from exposure and was sent home, an invalid for the rest of his life. The younger Wilson Gray Lamb remained in the army for the entire war, attaining the rank of second lieutenant. Forty years after enlisting with his kinsmen, Wilson wrote the chapter on the Seventeenth Regiment (first called the Seventh Volunteers) for Walter Clark's Histories of the Several Regiments and Battali­ons. He recorded much of his brother John's military career from personal observation or knowledge, including the battle whe­re the "brave and youthful Lieutenant Colonel Lamb fell mortally wounded upon the enemy's works and died a few days therafter.

John C. Lamb rose rapidly in the army. He helped organize the Roanoke Guards as the first company in Martin County, and ten days before the state passed the ordinance of secession, he was commissioned captain. His company, a part of the Seventh Regiment of North Carolina Volunteers, was mustered into service as Company F, Seventeenth Regiment, North Carolina Troops, at Hatteras Inlet on 26 July 1861 and was stationed at Fort Clark with Captain Lamb in command. One mile away, Fort Hatteras under Colonel W. F. Martin completed the defenses of the inlet, with fewer than a thousand men in the two forts; when attacked in late August by seven war vessels and the land forces of the U.S. fleet, both forts fell. The entire regiment was taken first to Fort Columbus, New York Har­bor, and then to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, for imprisonment. Some of Lamb's less unhappy experiences at Fort Warren are reflec­ted in mementos preserved by his family, including an autograph book with the names and addresses of about 135 fellow prisoners from fourteen states and Canada.“ (by Clara Hamlett Robertson Flannagan, 1991; in: http://ncpedia.org/biography/lamb-john-cal­houn).

Fort Hatteras August 1861: The Union assault on the Outer Banks came as no surprise to North Carolina authorities. It had been assu­red that the capture of Union prizes by the state's mosquito fleet would eventually bring enemies troops to the coast. General Walter Gwinn, in command of North Carolina's northern department of costal defense, nevertheless pleaded in vain for more men and guns for his command. When the Union fleet anchored off Hatteras Inlet on the afternoon of 27 August, the island's defenses were woeful­ly inadequate. The Union assault commenced the next morning with a heavy naval bombardment of Fort Clark. Under cover of this fire 318 men and two guns of Colonel Max Weber's Twentieth New York Regiment werde put ashore by noon. A heavy surf preven­ted more landings. Fortunately for the New Yorkers, Colonel J. C. Lamb, in command of Fort Clark, had expended his ammunition by this time and was under orders to spike his guns, take off what could be carried, and evacuate his position. During the afternoon the Confederates abandoned Fort Clark and started making their way across the narrow marsh to Fort Hatteras (vgl. Yearns/Harrett: North Carolina Civil War Documentary, a.a.O., S. 30).

Lamb was paroled near the end of January 1862, transferred for an official exchange of prisoners on 20 February, and mustered out of service with his company at Williamston a month later. Early in May, he and some of his men reported to Camp Mangum, about three miles west of downtown Raleigh, for the reorganization of the Seventeenth Regiment; on 16 May he was appointed captain of Company A and then named lieutenant colonel. By the end of the year, Lamb was in command of the force that made the first attack on Plymouth at the mouth of the Roanoke River on Albe-marle Sound. His troops captured and destroyed the town without losing a single Confederate. The records of the succeeding twenty-four months include his regiment's capture of the forts and all the artillery at Newport Barracks near Morehead City in February 1864, as well as the costly but successful assault in May at Bermuda Hundred in Virginia where Lamb was mortally wounded. He died one week after entering the North Carolina room at the officer's hospital in Petersburg, Va. His remains were taken home for burial in Williamston, where he had been a vestryman in the Episcopal Church of the Advent. He never married“ (by Clara Hamlett Robertson Flannagan, 1991; in: http://ncpedia.org/biography/lamb-john-calhoun)

Photo:

- LtCol John Calhoun Lamb (vgl. http://ncpedia.org/biography/lamb-john-calhoun)

 

 

Lambert, Christopher C.:

CS-Pvt; Co. K, 50th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 32).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Lambert, Christopher C.: Final statement, 15 March 1865, of monies received by C. C. Lambert, a private with Company K, 50th Virginia Infantry Regiment (vgl. Library of Virginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 39280)

 

Lambert, George Washington:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 14th Indiana Infantry Regiment (vgl. Sears: Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 9-10; vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 12). 1836 - † 9.2.1899; beerd. Shepherd Cemetery, Shepardsville, Vigo County, Indiana; °° mit Melissa Adeline Shepherd Lambert (1845 - † 1913; T. v. James Washington Shepherd und Catherine Ann Clapp Shepherd); aus der Ehe stammen 6 Kinder (vgl. www.­findagrave.com, Abruf v. 11.4.2016). Der „Newport Hoosier State“ schreibt am 15.2.1899: „ Mr. Lambert was a native born citizen of Clinton Township, where he spent the greater part of his life“.

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis: George W. Lambert Diary

 

 

Lambertson, G. W.:

CS-Sergeant; 1863 Sgt Co A 7th Tennessee Infantry BrigGen James J. Archer's *Brigade, MajGen A. P. Hill's Division Lee's Army of Nor­thern Virginia; Teilnahme am Angriff von Archer's Brigade am 1.7.1863 auf McPherson's Ridge westlich von Gettysburg (vgl. Mar­tin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 85).

 

 

Lambie, Gavin A.:

US-Captain; Co. E, 146th Regiment New York Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 80).

 

 

Lambie, James:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 3rd Regiment Michigan Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M545 Roll 23).

 

 

Lambie, James:

US-Pvt; Co. E, 193rd Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (100 days, 1864) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 68).

 

 

Lambie, James T.:

US-Pvt; Co. I, 5th Regiment Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery (204th Volunteers) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 68).

 

 

Lambie, James T.:

US-Pvt; Co. D, 137th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 68).

 

 

Lambie, Jasper:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 91st Regiment New York Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 80).

 

 

Lambie, Joseph:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 91st Regiment New York Infantry; originally filed under Jasper Lambie (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 80).

 

 

Lambie, John:

US-Pvt; Battery G, 1st Regiment West Virginia Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M507 Roll 7).

 

 

Lambie, John:

US-Corporal; Co. F, 3rd Regiment West Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M507 Roll 7).

 

 

Lambie, John:

US-Pvt; 5th Regiment West Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M507 Roll 7); s. auch 1st Regiment West Virginia Light Artillery (vgl. Hinweis bei National Park Soldiers M507 Roll 7, Stichwort John Lambie).

 

Lambie, John:

US-Sergeant; Co. A, 16th Regiment New York Heavy Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 10).

 

 

Lambie, John S.:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 193rd Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (100 days, 1864) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 68).

 

 

Lambie, Robert S.:

US-Pvt; Co. A, 13th Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry (117th Volunteers) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 18)

 

 

Lambie, William T.:

US-First Lt; Carpenter's Battery, Virginia Light Artillery (Alleghany Rough Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 32); zunächst CS-Pvt, Co. A, 27th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 32); diese Einheit wurde später in Carpenter's Battery umgewandelt.

 

Am 13.6.1863 im Battle of Winchester/VA befehligte Lambie die Carpenter's Battery, Virginia Light Artillery (Alleghany Rough Ar­tillery), bestehend aus 4 guns. Die US Battery L, 5thz US Artillery, commanded by Lt Edmund D. *Spooner ging südlich von Win­chester in Stellung (vgl. Karte bei Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 80) und eröffnete das Feuer auf die CS-Skirmishers der 2nd Virginia Infantry, die daraufhin hinter einer Steinmauer in Deckung gingen. Dagegen erlitt Carpenter's Battery, die gerade am Wald­rand und dem Steinwall auf der Südseite der offenen Pläne südlich von Winchester eingetroffen war, einen Toten und einen Verwund­eten. Carpenter’s Battery ging sofort trotz des Beschusses in Stellung and opened with a rapid volley on the Yankees just across the clearing. This caught the Federals by surprise; apparently they had not seen the Rebel artillery arrive (vgl. Nye: Here come the Re­bels, a.a.O., S. 81).

 

 

Lamon, Ward Hill:

1828-93; naher Freund und Geschäftspartner Lincoln's; geboren in Virginia, siedelte Lamon nach Danville, Ill. über, wo er als Rechtsanwalt praktizierte. 1861 ernannte ihn Lincoln zum Marshall des Districts Columbia. Er diente oft als Bodyguard Lincoln (vgl. Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 2, 270 Anm. 6). Schwie­gersohn von Stephen H. *Logan aus Springfield / Illinois (vgl. Basler: Collected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 1-2: Brief Lin­coln's an Stephen T. Logan vom 9.11.1863).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lamon, Ward Hill: Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, ed. Dorothy Teillard (Cambridge, Mass.: The University Press, 1895)

 

 

Lamson, Horace P.:

US-LtCol; 4th Indiana Cavalry; im Sommer 1864 Brigadekommandeur der 2nd Cavalry Brigade in Edward Moody *McCook's 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland. Lamson's Brigade bestand aus folgenden Einheiten (vgl. Evans: Sherman's Horsemen, a.a.O., S. xi):

- 2nd Brigade LtCol Horace P. Lamson, LtCol William H.

Torrey (assumed command am 20.7.1864, mortally wounded 30.7.1864), LtCol Horace P. Lamson (erneut ab

30.7.1864):

- 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Major David A. Biggs

- 4th Indiana Cavalry; Capt. Albert J. Morley (in command am 6.7.1864), Capt. John Austin (in command

10.7.1864), Capt. Albert J. Morley, LtCol Horace P. Lam son

- 1st Wisconsin Cavalry; Major Nathan Pine, LtCol W.

H. Torrey (assumed command 12.7.1864), Major Na-

than Pine (mortally wounded 29.7.1864), Capt. Lewis

M. B. Smith

 

Am 7.7.1864 bei Sherman's Vorstoß zum Chattahochee erreichte Lamson's Brigade die Mündung des Soap Creek in den Chattahoch­ee (vgl. Evans, a.a.O., S. 16-17 mit Karte S. 9), von wo sie sich nach Beschuß durch CS-Geschütze vom Südufer des Chattahochee aus deren Reichweite zurückzog (Evans, a.a.O., S. 17).

 

 

Lamson, Roswell H.:

US-Kapitän; US Navy Academy in Annapolis von 1858-1862; graduiert als 2. des Jahrgangs 1862 (vgl. McPherson / McPherson, a.a.O., S. 7 Anm. 1); noch während der Ausbildung wurden Lamson und seine Kameraden kurz nach Kriegsbeginn in den Einsatz ab­kommandiert, wobei Lamson zum US Flaggschiff USS Wabash kam und beim Angriff auf Port Royal einen Teil der Schiffsartillerie kommandierte; 1864 Kommandant der USS Gettysburg, die 1864 schnellstes Schiff der US-Navy war. Mai-Juni 1864 Commander der "Torpedo and Picket Division" auf dem James River.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- McPherson / McPherson, ed.: Lamson of the Gettysburg. The Civil War Letters of Lieutenant Roswell H. Lamson (New York - Ox­ford, Oxford University Press, 1997); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik39

 

 

Lamson, William:

US-Pvt; 20th Maine Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lamson, William: Maine to the Wilderness: The Civil War Letters of Private William Lamson, 20th Maine Infantry (Publisher's Press: Orange 1993); Edited by Roderick Engert; 108 pages; Photo Illustrated; Bibliography; Index

 

 

Lancaster, William H.

CS-Captain; Co. A, 37th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 13)

 

 

Land, Albert Lewis:

CS-Major; zunächst Captain Co. A, 41st Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 44378; Anm.: nicht genannt bei National Park Soldiers); später Major, Quartermaster Department, R. E. Lee's Staff, Army of Northern Virginia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M818 Roll 14).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Land, Albert Lewis: Letter, 15 November 1862, from Albert Lewis Land (1828-1873), 41st Virginia Infantry near Culpeper Court House, to his brother-in-law Jesse Harper Shelton (1826-1909) in Sussex County, Virginia. Land requests that Shelton send payrolls and other regimental records to him. He also writes about his unit’s movements, his chances of visiting home, food prices, the likelihood of Gen. William Mahone (1826-1895) losing his command, fears of the Union army being in the vicinity of his family’s home, and rumors that Union troops have abandoned their positions around Warrenton (vgl. vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 44378)

- Land, Albert Lewis: A good war-date Robert E. Lee staff officer's letter written in ink by Capt. Albert L. Land, 41st Va., 2pp. . oblong 8vo., Culpeper C. H., [Va.], Nov. 15, 1862 to his military friend officer "Shelton" concerning shoes, in part: "…The Regt (41st) want the old pay rolls that the officers may examine them before completing their rolls, and I would like for you to send them to me if you possibly can with safety. Also send to me a list of the shoes issued at Falling Creek & the parties to whom they were given. You could send me a list by mail & one by some other means so that I would be sure to get them soon. I did expect Gen. Garnett would let me go down at this time after the funds & then I would have you home but he says no he wants me here as we know not at what moment we may move. I have just received a large lot of clothing which I hope will suffice & tomorrow (Sunday) I expect to be engaged issuing it…If we are ordered to Richmond which it is reported we will be soon I want Billy & Maggie…Gen. Mahone is at Gordonsville on his way up here and will probably arrive tomorrow. He wanted me to go to Gordonsville tomorrow to bring his horse up, but I happened not to be subject to his orders just at this time. I would not be much surprised if Gen. Mahone was to return to Richmond without a command. Tell Carter to dispose of all his crop & stock so that he can move quickly and rapidly. I would like for Mother to be similarly situated for I feel confident that the Yankees will be in that section this winter… I heard today that the Yankees had abandoned their hold on the north side of the Rappahannock Warrenton and that great confusion and dissatis­faction prevailed in their ranks…I have a sword & pistol they can borrow to kill each other just when they get ready to commence the work…" Albert Lewis Land enlisted as a second lieutenant in company A 41st Virginia Infantry and was quickly appointed assistant quartermaster. By 1862 he served on the brigade staffs of Col. Chambliss and General Mahone and by the end of 1862 is listed as being on Robert E. Lee's staff. VG (vgl. Versteigerungsmitteilung 31.8.2008 bei http://hcaauctions.com/lot-18866.aspx, Abruf vom 21.8.2016).

 

 

Lander, Frederick West:

US-+++Gen; 1821-2.3.1862; Lander war ein fähiger und energischer Offizier (vgl. Henderson: Stonewall Jackson, a.a.O., S. 152). Lander verteidigte erfolgreich *Hancock / MD Anfang Januar 1862 gegen den Angriff Stonewall Jackson's; Lander, ein enger Freund von US-Finanzminister Chase, wurde 1861 bei der Verteidigung von Edwards Ferry während des Gefechts von Ball's Bluff schwer verwundet; bevor seine Wunde ausgeheilt war, führte er den Angriff bei Blooming Gap. Während der Vorbereitungen zum Einsatz seiner Division in Bank's Shenandoah Campaign starb Lander überraschend am 2.3.1862 an Lungenentzündung (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 470; vgl. auch Chase: Diary, a.a.O., S. 281 Anm. 38; Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 270 Anm. 4); seine Beerdigung in Washington am 6.3.1862 war ein trauriges Ereignis, einer der Sarg­träger war Gen McClellan (vgl. Rhodes, Elisha Hunt:: All for the Union, a.a.O., S. 48). Verheiratet war Lander mit der berühmten Schauspielerin Jean Margaret Davenport *Lander.

 

 

Lander, Jean Margaret Davenport:

1829-1903; in England geboren; berühmte amerikanische Schauspielerin; verheiratet mit General Frederick West *Lander. Nach dem Tod ihres Mannes im März 1862 übernahm sie die Leitung der Unions Militär Hospitäler in Port Royal, SC. Nach dem Krieg kehrte sie auf die Bühne zurück, wo sie erneut große Anerkennung fand (vgl. Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 1, 270 Anm. 4).

 

 

Landis, Henry:

US-Captain, Company A, 1st Regiment Philadelphia Home Guard

 

When state and local authorities clashed during the Pennsylvania Campaign of 1863 after Governor Curtin called for “Emergency Militia” to protect the state from a Confederate invasion. Curtin’s proclamation required a number of Philadelphia Home Guard com­panies to swear into the service of the Commonwealth. Interestingly, the Commonwealth demanded that these Home Guard units re­linquish their city-purchased rifled-muskets and accept state-issued arms at Harrisburg. This created considerable confusion. When Captain Henry Landis’ Company A, 1st Regiment Philadelphia Home Guard, returned to the city with state arms, City Councils de­manded that the city-purchased weapons be returned immediately. Landis wrote to Adjutant General Andrew L. Russell at Harris­burg, hoping that he might send the city arms in boxes so that they could be unpacked and the state arms returned to Harrisburg Arse­nal. Landis added, “The expenses of transportation I presume will be borne by the state.” Not having the time, money, or manpower to unpack 1,200-1,500 crates “promiscuously crowded together” in the State Arsenal to find the errant weapons, Russell informed Landis that Philadelphia City Councils would have to begrudgingly accept the state arms as their own (vgl. Timothy J. Orr: “Calling Urban Men to Arms: Northern Cities Mobilize to Fight the Civil War”, Report to the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Com­mission Scholars-In-Residence Program June 19-July 1, 2006, n.p.; Archiv Ref Amerikanischer Bürgerkrieg Nr. 6).

 

 

Landram, William J.:

US-Col; Brigadekommandeur 2nd Brigade, 10th Division Andrew J. Smith, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Cam­paign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 402). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 402).

 

 

Lane, Edwin A.:

US-Pvt; Co. H, 40th Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 23)

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

Lane, Edwin A.: Letter, 19 May 1863, from Edwin A. Lane (1845-1864), 40th Massachusetts Infantry at West Point, King William County, Virginia, to his aunt. Subjects include the movements of his unit, picket duty, skirmishing near Suffolk, a description of West Point, rations, and constructing breastworks (vgl. vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 41185)

 

 

Lane, Harriet:

Nichte von Präsident Buchanan; sie war First Lady im Weißen Haus (vgl. Nevins, The Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 120).

 

 

Lane, Henry:

CS-Major, +++- † gef. 9.8.1862 im Battle of Cedar Mountain; 1862 Regimentskommandeur 42nd Virginia Infantry; Battle of Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 (vgl. Battles and Leaders, Vol. II, a.a.O., S. 496); die 42nd Virginia Infantry gehörte Brigade Thomas Seldon *Garnett, die Brigade war im Battle of Cedar Mountain eingesetzt am Westrand des Wheatfield bis zur Culpeper Road (vgl. Krick, Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 108 mit Karte S. 109). Lane ist im Battle von Cedar Mountain gefallen (vgl. Abner Dobyns' Report OR 12.2. S. 203).

 

Lane war buried on Old Jacksonville Cemetery, Floyd, Floyd County, VA (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com)

 

 

Lane, James Henry (Jim):

US-++++; 1814-66; aus Lawrenceburg / Indiana; Rechtsanwalt in Lawrenceburg bis zum Ausbruch des Mexikokrieges; im Mexiko­krieg Col 3rd Indiana Infantry; entscheidend beteiligt am Sieg von Buena Vista; 1849 gewählt als Lieutenant Governor von Indiana; 1852 als Douglas Democrat in den US-Congress gewählt. Er stimmte für die Kansas-Nebrasca-Bill; da dieses Abstimmungsverhalten mit den Wünschen seiner Anhänger und Wähler in Indiana kollidierte und deshalb seine Wiederwahl aussichtslos schien, wanderte Lane 1855 nach Kansas Ref Internet-Datei, MilAmerik125, S. 41; Starr, Jennison's Jayhawkers, a.a.O., S. 11-13). Lane unterstützte Lincoln und die Forderung nach Emanzipation und Bewaffnung der Schwarzen. Bei Kriegsausbruch stellte Lane 2 Regimenter in Kansas auf und wurde im Herbst 1861 zum +++General ernannt (vgl. Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Com­plete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 269 Anm. 1). US-Senator von 1861-66; er unterstützte Lincoln und befürwortete die Emanzipation der Neger und die Aufstellung von Farbigen-Regimentern (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 471). Lane's Brigade war im Herbst berüchtigt wegen ihrer Übergriffe gegen die Zivilbevölkerung in Missouri (vgl. Starr: Jennison's Jayhawkers, a.a.O., S. 100).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History of the Civil War, vol I, a.a.O., S. 41

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Castel, Albert: "Kansas Jayhawking Raids into Western Missouri in 1861;" Missouri Historical Review, VIV, S. 1-11

- Connelley, William E.: James Henry Lane: The "Grim Chieftain" of Kansas (Topeka, 1899)

- Connelley, William E.: "The Lane Family." Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1923-1925, XVI, S. 29-32

- Langsdorf, Edgar: "Jim Lane and the Frontier Guard." Kansas Historical Quarterly, IX, S. 243-78

- Starr: Jennison's Jayhawkers, a.a.O., S. 11 (Influence of Lane on Kansas history), 12-14 (personal and political background), 27 (compared to Jennison), 36 (radicalism), 43-44 (Lane and the "Frontier Guard"), 45 (in conflict with General *Robinson), 45 (organi­zed Lane's Brigade), 46-49 (in operations against *Price and *McCulloch), 47 (in sacking of Osceola / Missouri), 48 (marauding of Lane's Brigade), 63 (asking for 3 Companies of SKVC to be sent to Kansas City), 100 (*Halleck complains against Lane), 124 (on "southern expedition"), 134 (as a master of diatribe), 158-59 (restoration of Jennison to command of SKVC), 181-82 (*Anthony's ar­rest), 216 (authorized to raise a negro regiment), 256-57 (Lawrence Massacre), 317 (antagonism of Lane to Governor Carney)

- Stephenson, Wendell H.: "The Political Career of General James H. Lane," Publications of the Kansas State Historical Society, III, S. 11-172

- Stephenson, Wendell H.: "The Transitional Period in the Career of General James H. Lane." Indiana Magazine of History, XXV, S. 75-91

- Williams, E. W. (ed.): With the Border Ruffians. Memories of the Far West, 1852-1868 by R. H. Williams [New York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1907], Bibliothek Ref Internet-Datei, MilAmerik125

 

 

Lane, James Henry:

CS-BrigGen; graduiert Virginia Military Institute; 1861 Major 1st North Carolina Infantry; Battle of Big Bethel (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., S. 58); gewählt zum Col. 28th North Carolina Infantry am 21.9.1861, s. Brief mit Bitte um Annahme der Wahl vom 21.9.1861, abgedruckt bei Speer, Voices of Cemetery Hill, a.a.O., S. 42); Gefecht von Hanover Court House am 27.5.1862 und Gefangennahme; White House Landing (S. 61); am 9.8.1862 im Battle of Cedar Mountain Col. der 28th North Carolina Infantry (vgl. Battles and Leaders, Vol. II, a.a.O., S. 496);. nachdem Lane im Herbst 1862 zum BrigGen von Lane's Brigade (7th, 37th, 33rd, 18th und 28th North Carolina Infantry) ernannt wurde, wurde Col. Samuel *Lowe Regimentskommandeur; auf ihn folgte Colonel Al­len Paul Speer.

 

Lane's Brigade gehörte während der Gettysburg Campaign zu Pender's Division und umfaßte folgende Regimenter (vgl. Gottfried: Brigades at Gettysburg, a.a.O., s. 464): 7th North Carolina, 18th North Carolina, 28th North Carolina, 33rd North Carolina, 37th North Carolina, Strength 1734.

 

Lane's Brigade bildete zusammen mit der Brigade Scales die zweite Linie während des Angriffs auf Cemetery Ridge / Battle of Get­tysburg am 3.7.1863 eingesetzt hinter Pettigrew's (Heth's) Division (vgl. Wilson: Pettigrew, a.a.O., S. 67).

 

Photo:

Speer, a.a.O., S. 30

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Dictionary of North Carolina, a.a.O., vol. 4, S. 12-13

- Lane, James H. Papers (1854-1907) - RG 501 [Lane's Brigade / 1st North Carolina Volunteers] (Auburn University Archives)

- **McDaid, William K.: „Four Years of Arduous Service“: The History of the Branch-Lane Brigade in the Civil War. PhD Dissertation, Michigan State University, 1987

- Speer, Allen Paul: "Voices from Cemetery Hill." The Civil War Diary, Reports and Letters of Colonel William Henry Asbury Speer (1861-1864); Johnson City / TN, 1997, Bibliothek Ref++++

- Young, Bennet: „Col. Lane and His Regiment“, Confederate Veteran 17 (March 1909)

 

 

Lane, John:

CS-LtCol; 11th Battalion, Georgia Artillery (Sumter Artillery); zunächst Captain, Co. C (new) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M226 Roll 35).

 

In the Gettysburg Campaign Major John Lane commanded the divisional Artillery of MajGen Richard Anderson Division, III. Corps Hill (vgl. Shultz/Mingus: Gettysburg 2nd Day, a.a.O., S. 7n17).

 

Major John Lane was an anomaly in the Confederate Army. He was born and raised in Indiana, but expressed strong states's rights views. His father, Joseph Lane, was John C. Breckenridge's running mate in the 1860 presidential election. John Lane resigned from West Point in February 1861 and joined the Confederate army (vgl. Shultz/Mingus: Gettysburg 2nd Day, a.a.O., S. 64n13).

 

 

Lane, John Quincy:

US-Colonel, 97th Ohio Infantry

 

 

Lane, John Randolph:

CS-Col 26th North Carolina Infantry; geb. 7.4.1835 Chatham County, NC. - † 31.12.1908 Mount Vernon Springs, Chatham County, North Carolina; aus Chatham County, NC; Lane trat am 6.10.1861 als Corporal in Co. G., 26th North Carolina Infantry ein; Capt 19.9.1861; Lt Col 19.8.1862; Colonel 1.7.1863.

 

He was listed as: Wounded 7/1/1863 Gettysburg, PA (Neck, jaw & mouth wounds), returned 11/15/1863 (place not stated) (Estimated day), wounded 5/4/1864 Wilderness, VA ("Refused a furlough"), Wounded 6/15/1864 Yellow Tavern, VA (Right leg wounded "refu­sed leave field"), Wounded 8/25/1864 Reams' Station, VA (Wounded in the left breast), returned 11/15/1864 (place not stated) (Esti­mated day); Paroled 5/2/1865 Greensboro, NC

 

Als Nachfolger des bei Gettysburg gefallen Henry King *Burgwyn wurde Lane Regimentskommandeur der 26th North Carolina In­fantry (vgl. im einzelnen Wilson: Pettigrew, a.a.O., S. 46); er leitete die Pickett Line am Marsh Creek am Abend des 30.6.1863 vor Gettysburg (vgl. Martin: Gettys­burg, a.a.O., S. 28).

 

„Colonel John R. Lane, of the famous Twenty-sixth regiment, was born in Chatham county, N. C., July 4, 1835. His parents were
possessed of limited means and he was reared with the advantages of self-denial and manly independence. Early in May, 1861, he volunteered in a company, raised in his county, known as the Chatham Boys, afterward Company G, Twenty-sixth regiment, State
troops. He was soon made a corporal, and at the first occurrence of avacancy, was elected captain. He was popular with his comrades from the first, and was noted for his unbounded patience, forbearance, kindness, sagacity and presence of mind. In August, 1862, af­ter undergoing a rigid examination, he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel. At Gettysburg, where the Twenty-sixth suffered the grea­test loss of any regiment, either Union or Confederate, during the four years' war, he was preeminently distinguished for gallantry.


This loss was mainly sustained in winning Seminary ridge on the first day of the fight. The men fell rapidly under the fire of
the enemy. Colonel Burgwyn picked up the colors from the fallen bearer and turned them over to Private Frank Hunnicutt, who was
shot dead after he had advanced but a few steps, Colonel Burgwyn falling about the same time. Lane assumed command and took the
colors from the hands of Lieutenant Blair, who had picked them up. Going quickly to the front he called out, "Twenty-sixth, follow
me," and as he looked around at his brave men, fell, as they thought, dead. The ball passed through the back of his head and
out at his mouth. But, as his men rallied under the terrible fire, and the remnant pushed on and carried the hill, so he fought against death and won the victory. On his return to the regiment six months later, he recruited his command by May, 1864,
to 750 men, and it was then pronounced by General Heth the best drilled regiment in his division. At the battle of the Wilderness it was in position near the center of Lee's line, and had the honor of opening the battle and the misfortune of losing many brave men. Near Spottsylvania Court House, General Lee, having called for the most reliable regiment in the division to guard a wagon train, the Twenty-sixth was assigned to that duty, General Lee remarking to Colonel Lane,"This is the greatest compliment I can bestow upon you and your regiment." At the surrender, Colonel Lane was in hospital at Danville, from the effects of another severe wound recei­ved at Reams' Station. He was wounded in all five times. As a regimental commander he was the worthy successor of Zebulon B. Vance and Harry K. Burgwyn, and a painting, showing the three heroes, is one of the valued artistic and patriotic treasures of the State. Since the war, Colonel Lane has been engaged in business in his native county“ (aus: Confederate Military History Vol. V p. 590 ).

 

When the American Civil War erupted in 1861, he was working as a common farmer in central North Carolina. In May 1861, he pledged allegiance to his native state and enlisted as a Private into Company G of “The Chatham Boys”. Identified also as the “Chat­ham Grays”, the boys of Chatham County were subsequently assembled and mustered into Confederate service to form the 26th North Carolina Infantry Regiment. In the ranks, his sagacity, kindness and self-discipline became manifest and for this reason, earned the admiration and high regard of his fellow comrades. Elected to fill a Captaincy vacancy on September 19, 1861, he ably led his command at New Bern, North Carolina on March 14, 1862 during the Regiment’s effort to thwart the advancing blue columns com­manded by Union General Ambrose Everett Burnside after this force made an amphibious landing on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. Thereafter, Lane was selected for a promotion to Lieutenant Colonel and was commissioned to this rank on August 19, 1862. Accom­panying General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia northward during its 1863 summer offensive, he was at hand during the critical first day of fighting at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Entering this crossroads town from the north-west, the ensuing battle was in full progress when he and the 26th North Carolina were deployed in a battle line opposite McPherson’s Ridge where Union General Solomon Meredith’s famed “Iron Brigade” awaited their advance. Assigned the menacing duty of dislodging these black-hatted ve­terans from their strategic position, Lane led his disciplined Tar Heels from Herr Ridge through a murderous fire to bitterly contest McPherson’s Ridge. At the height of the murderous action, Colonel Henry King Burgwyn Jr., commander of the 26th North Carolina, fell with a mortal wound. Now as the senior officer of the regiment, the leadership and responsibilities of it fell to him. After kneeling to comfort the dying Burgwyn, Lane rose to rally the remnants of his decimated North Carolinians. Pressing through smoke, sound and fury to within 20 yards of the Federal position in Herbst Woods, he was holding the Regiment’s colors aloft when a musket of a 24th Michigan infantryman was brought against him. The Wolverine’s rifle ball entered at the rear of Lane’s neck and passed through his mouth causing life lasting damage. Falling “limber as a rag” on the battlefield, his men charged to the fore without his leadership and continued to press on until the Union soldiers abandoned their position. Promoted to Colonel to date from July 1, 1863, he reco­vered enough from the ghastly Gettysburg injury to return and continue as the third and last Colonel of the 26th North Carolina In­fantry. For the remaining two years of bloody warfare, he directed his men in battle during all of the minor and major engagements that the Army of Northern Virginia participated. At the Wilderness on May 4, 1864, he “refused a furlough” to recuperate from a wound he received from the melee and likewise would refuse to leave the field after a wound to his right leg at Yellow Tavern, Virgi­nia on June 15, 1864. In the closing year of the war, his accumulated and mounting wounds at last hospitalized him. He was bedrid­den in a Danville, Virginia infirmary when his 26th North Carolina Infantry stacked their weapons and officially surrendered without him at Appomattox, Virginia on April 9, 1865. He was paroled on May 2, 1865 at Greensboro, North Carolina. Upon returning to Chatham County, North Carolina, he became the prosperous proprietor of the Brookside Farm and Land Company. Regardless of ne­ver fully recovering from his wounds, he lived to the senior age of seventy-three when on December 31, 1908 he spoke his last words: “I am nearing the shore“ (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com/).

 

Photo:

- Photo on Col. Lane's ''Tombstone (vgl. http://www.companyh26th.com/third-colonel---john-randolph-lane.html)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lane, John R. (Col 26th North Carolina Infantry): Papers. Southern Historical Collection. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

 

 

Lane, Joseph:

1801-1881, geboren in North Carolina, zog nach Indiana, kämpfte im Mexikanischen Krieg wo er den Rang eines BrigGen erwarb. Gouverneur des Oregon Territory von 1849-1854, Mitglied des US-Congresses von 1854-1859. Als Oregon 1859 als Staat der USA aufgenommen wurde, wählte man Lane zu einem der Oregon Senatoren in den US-Senat. 1860 kandidierte Lane als US-Vizepräsi­dentschaftskandidat von Präsidentschaftsbewerber John C. *Breckinridge auf der Liste der Southern-Rights-Demokraten (vgl. Josephy: The War in the West, a.a.O., S. 19; vgl. Shultz/Mingus: Gettysburg 2nd Day, a.a.O., S. 64n13). Sein Sohn John Lane war im Bürgerkrieg CS-Cavalry Colonel (vgl. McPherson/Mc­Pherson, Lamson of the Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 21 +++prüfen+++); Vater von LtCol John Lane (Georgia Sumter Artillery) (vgl. Shultz/Mingus: Gettysburg 2nd Day, a.a.O., S. 64 n13).

 

 

Lane, Walter Paine:

CS-BrigGen (1865); Col 3rd Texas Cavalry Regiment.

 

Lane was born in County Cork, Ireland. The Lane family emigrated to Fairview in Guernsey County, Ohio, in 1821, and moved to Kentucky in 1825. In 1836 Lane moved to Texas to participate in its war for independence against Mexico. After Texas had gained its independence, Lane lived in San Augustine County in East Texas and then San Antonio, where he briefly served as a Texas Ran­ger. In 1846 Lane joined the First Regiment, Texas Mounted Riflemen, as a first lieutenant to fight in the Mexican-American War. Lane fought with honors at the Battle of Monterey and was later given the rank of majorand command of his own battalion. Af­ter the Mexican-American War, Lane wandered about doing various things in Arizona, California, and Peru before opening a mercan­tile business in Marshall, Texas, in 1858 (vgl. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_P._Lane).

 

When the Civil War broke out, Lane was among the first Texans to call for secession. Lane's military reputation was so great that the first volunteer Confederate company raised in Harrison County was named for him, though Lane would join the 3rd Texas Cavalry. Im Frühjahr 1862 war er CS-LtCol 3rd Texas Cavalry. Im Frühjahr 1862 während der Pea Ridge Campaign gehörte die 3rd Texas Ca­valry unter Col Elkanah *Greer zu BrigGen James M. *McIntosh's Cavalry Brigade in Benjamin *McCulloch's Division, Van Dorn's Army of the West (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335).

 

Lane participated in the battles of Wilson's Creek, Missouri, Chustenahlah,Pea Ridge and both the Siege of Corinth and Second Battle of Corinth. Lane led the 3rd Texas at the battle of Franklin, Mississippi, and was commended by General P.G.T. Beauregard for his efforts. Lane was severely wounded in the Battle of Mansfield in 1864, where Confederates forces rebuffed a push to capture either or both Shreveport, Louisiana, or Marshall, Texas. Before the war ended, Lane was promoted to the rank of brigadier general in 1865, being confirmed on the last day the Confederate Congress met (vgl. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Wal­ter_P._Lane).

 

After the Civil War Lane returned to Marshall where he helped to establish the Texas Veterans Association. After Reconstruction, Lane and his brother George, a local judge, founded the first White Citizens Party in Texas and ran Republicans and African-Americans out of Marshall. With Democratic white hegemony brutally reestablished in Marshall and Harrison County, Lane declared the city and county "redeemed". He died in Marshall, Texas, and is buried in the Marshall Cemetery near downtown Marshall. His memoirs, The Adventures and Recollections of General Walter P. Lane, were published posthumously in 1928 (vgl. http://en. wikipe­dia.org/ wiki/ Walter_P._Lane).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lane, Walter P.: The Adventures and Recollections of General Walter P. Lane (2nd ed. Marshall / Texas, 1928)

 

 

Lang, David:

CS-Col; geboren 1838 in Camden County / Georgia; graduated from the Georgia Military Institute in 1857; enlisted 1861 als Pvt in der 1st Florida Infantry; Sgt 1st Florida Infantry bei Ablauf seiner Dienstzeit. Lang stellte dann aus eigener Initiative Co C 8th Flori­da Infantry auf und wurde acht Monate später Col 8th Florida Infantry (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 539n20); im Battle of Get­tysburg war Col Lang Brigadekommandeur der 4th Brigade (Perry's Brigade), der Florida Brigade (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 363).

 

Photo:

- Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 357

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Dempsey, Stuart R.: „The Florida Brigade at Gettysburg,“ Blue&Gray Magazine, vol. XXVII, Issue No. 4, 2010 (Anm. es handelt sich um Perry's Brigade [Col David Lang], Anderson's Division, III. Corps, bestehend aus 2nd Florida, 5th Florida, 8th Florida [vgl. Gottfried: Brigades of Gettysburg, a.a.O., S.584])

- **Groene, Bertram H., ed.: "Civil War Letters of Colonel David Lang." Florida Historical Quarterly 54 (1976): 340-66

- **Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., 358, 363, 373-74, 380, 414 539n20

 

 

Lang, Theodore F.:

US-Major; 6th West Virginia Cavalry. Lang, who served as Adjutant of the 3rd West Virginia Infantry and as a Major in the 6th West Virginia Cavalry, focused on military operations in West Virginia and its soldiers who remained loyal to the Union.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lang, Theodore (Major 6th W. VA Cavalry): Loyal West Virginia from 1861-1865 (Baltimore 1895, First Edition); 63 Photographic Portraits, Maps. Nevins says "...contains good sections on attitudes that existed between Virginians and West Virginians" Lang, who served as Adjutant of the 3rd West Virginia Infantry and as a Major in the 6th West Virginia Cavalry, focused on military operations in West Virginia and its soldiers who remained loyal to the Union. Details of military leaders serving in the state or under West Virgi­nia banners on the bloody battlefields of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania.

 

 

Langheinrich, Ludolph:

s. Ludolph *Longhenry

 

 

Langston, John G.:

1829 - † 10.2.1903 Philadelphia/Pennsylvania (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com); US-Captain; 8th New Jersey Infantry (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 448).

 

He began his Civil War service soon after the Confederate bombardment, being commissioned and mustered as the 1st Lieutenant for Company K, 2nd New Jersey Militia on May 1, 1861. After serving with his unit in the defenses of Washington, DC and in reserve during the July 1861 First Bull Run Campaign, he was mustered out on July 31, 1861. Not long after he re-joined the Union war ef­fort, receiving a commission of Captain and commander of Company K, 8th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry on September 27, 1861. He would go on to serve for three full years of enlistment, and would commanded the regiment on three different occasions when his superior officers were wounded in battle. At Second Bull Run in August 1862 he briefly commanded the unit when he arrived on the field after being temporarily detached, taking over command from Captain George Hoffman, and relinquished command when Major John Ramsay of the 5th New Jersey Infantry was detailed to the regiment. The next he was in command was at the May 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville when now Colonel Ramsay was wounded in the arm while the regiment was withdrawing after being engaged in heavy fighting. Colonel Ramsay would return to command the regiment during the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg. In that Battle, the 8th New Jersey Infantry fought near the Wheatfield in the Rose Woods. During the unit's participation in the resisting of Confederate assaults in that area, Colonel Ramsay was again wounded, and for the third time Captain Langston assumed command, which he held for the rest of the campaign. He was honorably mustered out on September 21, 1864 (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Photo:

Captain John G. Langston (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com/)

 

 

Langthorne, Daniel A.:

CS-LtCol. Im Mai 1861 befahl der Oberbefehlshaber der Virginia State Troops Robert E. Lee, an Orten mit guter Eisenbahnanbin­dung, wie z.B. in Lynchburg, Mobilisierungszentren einzurichten (vgl. Freeman: R. E. Lee, Vol I., a.a.O., S. 492 mit Anm. 8). Am 16.5.1861 übernahm Col. Jubal Early das Kommando in Lynchburg und stellte hier die 24th Virginia Infantry, 28th Virginia Infantry und 30th Virginia Infantry auf, die von LtCol Langthorne vereidigt wurden (vgl. Early: War Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 2). Infolge der CS-Truppenkonzentration und der neu eingeführten Brigadegliederung wurde Early nach Manassas kommandiert und übergab das Kom­mando in Lynchburg Mitte Juni 1861 an LtCol Daniel A. Langthorne (vgl. Early, a.a.O, S. 4).

 

 

Langhorne, James:

CS-Private, 4th Virginia Infantry, Stonewall Brigade (vgl. Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 51 Anm. 2)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Langhorne, James: Langhorne Letter: Wartime letters of James Langhorne, a member of the 4th Virginia Infantry, primarily written during 1861 and 1862. Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia

 

 

Langthorne, John S.:

CS-Major; 30th Virginia Infantry, aufgestellt unter Jubal Early Ende Mai 1861 in *Lynchburg / Virginia (vgl. Early: War Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 2, 4); die bald in 2nd Virginia Cavalry umbenannt wurde (vgl. Blackford: Letters from Lee's Army, a.a.O., S. 2).

 

 

Lanier, Sidney Clopton:

CS-Pvt; Co B, 2nd Georgia Infantry Battalion (vgl. National Park Soldiers M226 Roll 35, erfaßt als Sidney C. Lanier) Pvt im Signal Corps CSA (vgl. National Park Soldiers M818 Roll 14).

 

Als Soldat 1862 in Petersburg eingesetzt (vgl. Sears: Landscape Turned Red, a.a.O., S. 94); berühmter Schriftsteller der Nachkriegs­zeit. Lanier schreibt angesichts von Lee's Maryland Campaign vom September 1862 über seine Hoffnungen vom bevor­stehenden Fall Washingtons und dem anschließenden Frieden (vgl. Anderson / Starke, a.a.O., vol. VII, S. 61).

 

Sidney Clopton Lanier (3.2.1842 in Macon, Georgia – † 7.9.1881 in Lynn, North Carolina) war ein US-amerikani­scher Dichter und Musiker. Er galt neben Edgar Allan Poe als der bekannteste amerikanische Dichter des 19. Jahrhunderts. Sidney Lanier war der Sohn des Richters Robert Sampson Lanier, mit hugenottischen Vorfahren, und seiner aus Schottland stammenden Ehefrau Mary Jane An­derson. Er studierte ab 1856 an der Oglethorpe University in Atlanta und war später bis zum Ausbruch des Amerikanischen Bürgerkriegs als Tutor tätig. Im Frühjahr 1861 meldete er sich freiwillig in den Dienst der Konföderierten. 1864 wurde Lanier von Soldaten der Unionsarmee gefangen genommen und für fünf Monate im Gefängnis von Point Lookout, Florida, inhaftiert. Während seiner Wanderschaft in die Heimat erkrankte er an Tuberkulose, an deren Folgen er später immer wieder litt (aus https://de.wikipedia. org/wiki/ Sidney_Lanier).

 

Nach dem Krieg arbeitete Lanier in Georgia, Alabama und Texas als Tutor, Lehrer, und Rechtsanwalt und schrieb nebenbei Romane und Gedichte. Im Jahr 1867 heiratete er seine Jugendliebe Mary Day; aus dieser Ehe gingen vier Söhne hervor. Seine ersten Gedichte wurden im Jahr 1869 veröffentlicht. Seinen ersten Roman über seine Erlebnisse im Krieg schrieb er innerhalb von drei Wochen. Im Oktober 1877 zog er nach Baltimore und verdiente sein Lebensunterhalt mit Vorlesungen über englische Literatur. Zwei Jahre später wurde er Dozent an der Johns Hopkins University. Durch seinen schlechten Gesundheitszustand zog er mit seiner Familie in die Ber­ge von North Carolina. Sidney Lanier starb am 7. September 1881 in Lynn. Nach seinem Tod stieg sein Bekanntheitsgrad stetig an und am 7. August 1920 wurde ihm zu Ehren der 155. County von Georgia in Lanier County benannt. Auch zwei Seen tragen seinen Namen: einer nordöstlich von Atlanta, ein anderer im Tryon County (North Carolina) (aus https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Sidney_La­nier).

 

Photo:

Sidney C. Lanier (aus https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Sidney_Lanier).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Anderson, Charles R. and Aubrey H. Starke (eds.): Centennial Edition of the World of Sidney Lanier (Baltimore: John Hopkins Un­iversity Press, 1945)

 

 

Lanier, Thomas C.:

CS-LtCol; 42nd Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M375 Roll 25).

 

Regimentskommandeur 42nd Alabama Infantry; Battle of Resaca 13.-15.5.1864 (vgl. Brief von J. Earl Preston; an Confe­derate Ve­teran Magazine, January, 1898; abgedruckt bei Secrist: Battle of Resaca, a.a.O., S. 72)

 

 

Lanning, Henry B.:

US-Sergeant, Co. F, 9th New Jersey Infantry Regiment

 

Photo:

Sgt Henry B. Lanning, Co. F, 9th New Jersey Infantry, Photo um 1863 (VMI-Archives Lexington/VA)

 

 

Lanphere, C. H.:

US-Captain; Batteriechef 7th Battery, Michigan Light Artillery, 9th Division Osterhaus, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Campaign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 402). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II. S. 402).

 

 

Lansing, A. S.:

US-Col, 17th New York Infantry (vgl. Eisenschiml: The Celebrated Case, a.a.O., S. 68)

 

 

Lard, Almon:

US-Pvt; Co. I, 32nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 23).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lard, Almon: Pay voucher, 9 December 1864, to Anna Lard, wife of Almon Lard, Company I, 27th Massachusetts Regiment, who was a prisoner of war, for pay from March-August 1864. Includes transcript (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 41551)

 

 

Larrison, Thomas J.:

US-Captain; Co ‘B’ 2nd Illinois Cavalry; Co 'B' gehörte im Frühjahr 1862 zur 1st Brigade Oglesby, 1st Division McClernand, Grant’s Army of the Tennessee bei der Eroberung von *Fort Donelson im Februar 1862 (vgl. US Grant; in: Battles and Leaders Vol. I S. 429; Wallace, Lew: The Capture of Fort Donelson; in: B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 417-419).

 

 

Latané, William:

CS-Captain, Stuart's Cavalry, William Henry Fitzhugh Lee's 9th Virginia Cavalry; gefallen im Juni 1862 bei Hanover Court House während Stuart's Umgehungsritt um McClellan's rechten Flügel (Chickahominy Raid) bei den Erkundungen vor Lee's Angriff nach Norden, der den US-Angriff auf Richmond nach den Seven Days stoppte. Latané starb in den Armen seines Bruders und wurde über Nacht zum Helden der CSA (vgl. Time-Life-Book: Lee Takes Command, a.a.O., S. 26).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- o.A.: "About the Burial Services of Capt. Latane." Confederate Veteran 10 (1902), S. 62

 

 

Latham, G. Woodville:

CS-Captain, 11th Virginia Infantry (vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 146).

 

 

Lathrop, David:

US-Hospital Steward; Co. F&S, 59th Regiment Illinois Infantry; zuvor Pvt, Co. F, 59th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. NARA microfilm publication M539 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 51; FHL microfilm 881,671.)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lathrop, David: The History of the Fifty-Ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteers. Indianapolis, 1865

 

 

Lathrop, Edward S.:

CS-Pvt; Wheaton's Company, Georgia Artillery (Chatham Artillery) (vgl. NARA microfilm publication M226 (Washington D.C.: Na­tional Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 36). Lathrop war auch Corporal, 1sr Regiment Georgia Infantry (Olmstead's) und trat als Sergeant in das Regiment ein (vgl. NARA microfilm publication M226 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Re­cords Administration, n.d.), roll 36).

 

 

Lathrop, Stanley E:

US-Corporal; Co. M, 1st Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry (vgl. NARA microfilm publication M559 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 17; vgl. Evans: Sherman's Horsemen, a.a.O., S. 18).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lathrop, Stanley: Papers (State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison / Wisconsin)

- Lathrop, Stanley E.: A Brief Memorial to Captain Clayton E. Rogers (n.p., 1900)

 

 

Latimer, Joseph W.:

CS-Major; er trat als Second Lieutenant in die Courtney Artillery, Virginia (Henrico Artillery) ein, und wurde dann um Captain beför­dert (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 33).

 

Als Captain war Latimer Batteriechef von Latimer's Virginia Battery (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 54). Latimer komman­dierte im Frühjahr 1862 *Courtney's Battery während Jackson's Shenandoah Campaign (Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 193-95). Latimer's Battery gehörte während Jackson's Vorstoß gegen Pope's neuaufgestellte Army of Virginia im Juli / August 1862 und beim Battle of Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 zu der, von A. R. *Courtney befehligten Divisionsartillerie der Division Ewell's (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 362). Latimer's Battery eröffnete neben anderen Artillerie-Batterien das Feuer auf die US-Cavalry bei Crittenden House als Eröffnung der Schlacht von Cedar Mountain (vgl. Krick, a.a.O., S. 54; Grimsley: Battles in Culpeper, a.a.O., S. 27; OR 12 [3] 228, 237). Im Battle of Gettysburg kommandierte Major Latimer Richard Snowden *Andrews Battalion (1st Maryland Artillery), das auf Benner's Hill abprotzte und die US-Truppen von der Höhe aus beschoß (vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 316).

 

 

Latimer, Thomas:

CS-Captain; Co. A, 32nd Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 13)

 

 

Latrobe, Osmun:

CS-LtCol; 12.4.1835 Natchez, Adams Co./Miss. - † 8.10.1915 New York, beerd. Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore/Maryland (vgl. http://www.geni.com); Latrobe war aufgewachsen in Maryland; in der Vorkriegszeit war Latrobe Rechtsanwalt; Grandson of US Ca­pitol architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe, and son of Maryland engineer and railroad lawyer John H.B. Latrobe.

 

In March 1862 he was appointed Captain and Assistant Adjutant General (AAG) on Gen J.E. Johnston's staff; by June, as AAG and Inspector General (IG) with Gen Jones. In the Antietam Campaign schreibt MajGen D. R. Jones: "Capt. Osmun Latrobe, my inspec­tor-general, on all occasions, and particularly at Sharpsburg, conducted himself with distinguished gallantry. Wherever the battle ra­ged hottest, there was he, directing and encouraging the troops. I earnestly recommend his promotion to the rank of major. " (vgl. OR Vol. 19/Part 1 (Ser #27), pp. 885-887). In December 1862 he was appointed Major, and joined the staff of Gen Longstreet, with whom he served until Appomattox. At Fredericksburg, he helped direct artillery fire and later wrote that he "enjoyed the sight of hundreds of dead Yankees. Saw much of the work I had done in the way of severed limbs, decapitated bodies, and mutilated remains of all kinds, doing my soul good. Would that the whole northern army was such and I had my hand in it." (vgl. Latrobe Diary). He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in December 1864.

In der Nachkriegszeit: Family lore mentions that he worked with his father on a railroad case against the Russian government in St. Petersburg, and that he was "prominent in the social life of Baltimore and New York" after the War. He married in 1871 in London, England mit Eliza Bradley Winchester (vgl. http://www.geni.com).

AAG in Longstreet's Stab (vgl. Kegel: North with Lee and Jackson, a.a.O., S. 5).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Latrobe, Osmun: Papers (ans Diary). Virginia Historical Society, Richmond/VA

 

 

Latter, Edward V.:

CS-Pvt, Co. C, 18th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23).

 

Edward V. Latter, a Londoner, enlisted in Company C, 18th North Carolina Infantry in Columbus County in April 1861, giving his occupation as "poet." The wordsmith was wounded once during the war, and captured twice. He survived nearly a year at Elmira Pri­son in New York, and was released in May 1865 (vgl. http://www.nccivilwar150.com/features/foreigners/foreigners.htm).

 

 

Laughlin, John M.:

US-Captain, 104th Pennsylvania Infantry; überlebte die sinnlose und verlustreiche Schlacht von Secessionville.

 

Photo:

- vgl. Wiley u.a.: The Photographic History of the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 172

 

 

Lauman, Jacob C.:

US-+++Gen; Col 7th Iowa Infantry; Teilnahme an Grant's Battle of Belmont 1861 (vgl. Catton, Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 82) und am Battle of Fort Donelson. In beiden Schlachten zeichnete sich Lauman aus; im Battle of Belmont wurde er verwundet (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 195).

 

In der Shiloh Campaign und im Battle of Shiloh gehörte die 3rd Brigade BrigGen Jacob C. Laumann zur 4th Division BrigGen Ste­phen A. Hurlbutt in Grant's Army of the Tennessee. Lauman war einer der fähigsten Brigadekommandeure in Grant's Army of the Tennessee, obwohl ihm das formale militärische Training fehlte (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 195). Lauman's Brigade umfaßte um Battle of Shiloh am 6.4.1862 folgende Einheiten:

- 31st Indiana Infantry

- 44th Indiana Infantry

- 17th Kentucky Infantry

- 25th Kentucky Infantry

 

Am 6.4.1862 im Battle of Shiloh gegen 8:30 - 10:00 war Lauman's Brigade am westlichen Teil von Sarah Bell's Field mit Front nach Westen eingesetzt (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 195 mit Karte S. 194).

 

Während Grant's Vicksburg Campaign im November 1862 war Lauman Divisionskommandeur in McPherson's Right Wing in Grant's Army of the Tennessee (= XIII Army Corps) (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 30, 33; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 538); am 23.11.1862 wurde Lauman von McPherson's Left Wing zu Sherman's Right Wing (= District of Memphis) verlegt (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Cam­paign, a.a.O., S. 72n46). Teilnahme am Vorstoß von Bolivar, Tennessee Richtung Grand Junction, Mississippi im November 1862 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 33) und beim weiteren Vorstoß nach Holly Springs. Hierbei besetzte Lauman's Division La­mar am 8.11.1862 (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 40). Beim anschließenden Gefecht am 8.11.1862 südlich von Lamar zwischen der US Ca­valry unter Albert Lindley Lee (7th Illinois Cavalry, 2nd Iowa Cavalry, 7th Kansas Cavalry, 3rd Michigan Cavalry) und der CS Ca­valry (7th Tennessee Cavalry, 1st Mississippi Cavalry) unter Col William H. 'Red' Jackson wurde durch eine taktische Falle Lau­man's die CS Cavalry geschlagen (vgl zu den Einzelheiten: Bearss,, a.a.O., S. 40)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lauman, Jacob: Letters (Chicago Historical Society, Chicago / Illinois)

 

 

Lavender, John W.:

CS-Captain, 3rd Louisiana Infantry (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 63 mit Anm. 4 S. 351, ); Teilnahme an der Pea Ridge Campaign (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., 63 mit S. 351 Anm. 4; Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 134 mit Anm. 1 S. 362). Während der Pea Ridge Campaign im Frühjahr 1862 gehörte das Regiment unter Regimentskommandeur Major Will F. *Tunnard zur Brigade Louis Hébert. Am 7.3.1862 eingesetzt bei den Kämpfen in Morgan’s Woods (vgl. Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 125 mit Karte S. 123, 131-133 mit Karte S. 132, 134 ff

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Worley, Ted R. (ed.): The War Memoirs of Captain John W. Lavender, CSA (Pine Bluff, Arkansas 1956)

 

 

Lavender, William Granison:

CS-Pvt. Civil War Veteran. Enlisted as a Private 10 Mar 1862 in Company I, Georgia 43rd Infantry Regiment. Mustered out 15 Sep 1862 due to disability. Re-enlisted Company I, 16th Georgia Cavalry Battalion 10 Feb 1864. Mustered out of Company I, 16th Geor­gia Cavalry Battalion 2 May 1864. Transferred into Company I, 13th Georgia Cavalry Regiment 2 May 1864. Surrendered and mus­tered out with Company I, 13th Georgia Cavalry Regiment 15 Apr 1865 in Newman, Coweta County, GA (vgl. www.findagrave.­com).

 

15.2.1831 Jackson County/GA - † 13.11.1912 Statham, Barrow County/GA; beerd. Booth Memorial Park, Statham/GA; °° ca. 1856 mit Nancy Elizabeth Booth Lavender (1833-1888) (vgl. www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Law, Evander McIver:

CS-BrigGen; 7.8.1836 Darlington / South Carolina - 31.10.1920 Bartow / Florida; Sohn von Ezekiel Augustus Law und Sarah Eliz­abeth McIver; aus Society Hill / Darlington, South Carolina. Ausbildung an der South Carolina Military Academy, graduiert 1856. Lehrer an mehreren Militärschulen im Süden; nach Kriegsausbruch Captain 4th Alabama Infantry; verwundet im Battle of 1st Ma­nassas; anschließend Col. 4th Alabama Infantry; Col und Brigadekommandeur von Law's Brigade während der Peninsula Campaign (4th Alabama Infantry, 2nd Mississippi Infantry, 11th Mississippi Infantry und 6th North Carolina Infantry); BrigGen 15.10.1862;

 

Law's Brigade wurde reorganisiert und bestand nun aus folgenden Regimentern:

- 4th Alabama Infantry Col Pinckney Downey *Bowles

- 15th Alabama Infantry Col William C. Oates

- 44th Alabama Infantry Col William Flake Perry

- 47th Alabama Infantry Col James Washington Jackson

- 48th Alabama Infantry Col James Lawrence Sheffield

 

1863 während der Gettysburg Campaign gehörte Law's 4th Brigade zu Longstreet’s I. Army Corps, 1st Division Hood. Law's Brigade comprised 5 Alabama Regiments who were known for their valor in combat, charging in seven of ten battles. In der Schlacht von Gettysburg kämpfte Law's Alabama Brigade an Little Round Top.

 

Nachdem General Hood verwundet worden war, übernahm Law zeitweise das Kommando über Hood's Division. MajGen James Longstreet wünschte jedoch die Beförderung von Micah Jenkins an Stelle von Law. Die Kontroverse endete als Gen Hood wieder dienstfähig geworden war. In der Schlacht von Chickamauga September 1863 kommandierte Law nach der erneuten Verwundung von Gen Hood erneut dessen Division. Teilnahme am Battle of Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna. In der Schlacht von North Anna wurde Law schwer verwundet. Nach seiner Gesundung wurde Law auf eigenen Wunsch nach North Carolina versetzt, wo er eine Cavalry Brigade kommandierte.

 

In der Nachkriegszeit wurde Law involved in agricultural affairs und helped organize the Alabama Grange in 1872. He was also asso­ciated with Kings Mountain Military Academy until it closed in 1881. At that point, Law relocated to Florida and opened the Southern Florida Military Insitute at Bartow. Law operated the school until 1903. He also edited the Bartow Courier-Informant (1902-1915) and served on the Bartow Board of Education from 1912 until his death. Law was also active in Confederate veteran's activities and commanded the Florida Division, helped to organize a UDC Chapter in Bartow and wrote several articles about the war. Sein Grab befindet sich auf dem Oak Hill Cemetery in Bartow / Florida.

 

zu der Anklage gegen Law und der Fehde zwischen Longstreet und Law:

General Jenkins berichtete Longstreet von einer Bemerkung Law's zu seinem Vorgesetzten Jenkins, daß er - Law - nicht bereit sei, diesem die Sporen für die Beförderung zum MajGen zu verdienen. Auf Befehl Longstreet's sollte Jenkins die Anklage gegen Law vorbereiten, die Angelegenheit wurde jedoch zunächst aus militärischen Gründen zurückgestellt (vgl. Longstreet: From Manassas to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 477). Während der East Tennessee Campaign und dem Angriff Longstreet's gegen Knoxville handelte Law bei einem Flankenangriff von *Jenkins' Division, indem er gegen den Befehl frontal statt flankierend in den Rücken der US-Truppen angriff, wodurch das Gefecht verloren ging (vgl. Longstreet: From Manassas to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 494). Nach dem Report eines Stabsoffiziers der Division Jenkins soll Law dies vorsätzlich verursacht haben, um zu verhindern, daß Jenkins als sein nächster Vor­gesetzter den Ruhm der gewonnenen Schlacht verdiene (abgedruckt bei Longstreet: From Manassas to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 495). Hierdurch schlug der Angriff fehl, den US-Truppen gelang es, sich unbehelligt hinter ihre Verteidigungsstellungen vor Knoxville zu­rückzuziehen (vgl. Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 495). Weitere Vorwürfe wurden in der Folge erhoben wegen befehlswidriger Marschverzö­gerung (vgl. Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 514). Am 19.12.1863 reichte Law seinen Rücktritt ein (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 519). In der Folge wurde durch Longstreet ein Kriegsgerichtsverfahren gegen Law eingeleitet mit dem Vorwurf heimlich einen ihm persönlich anver­trauten offiziellen Bericht Longstreet's an das Kriegsministerium (vgl. Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 519) unterschlagen zu haben, der ihm anvertraut war und dem die Rücktrittserklärung von Law vom 19.12.1863 beigefügt war (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 548). Wie Gen. Sa­muel *Cooper (Adjutant and Inspector-General der Army), der die Angelegenheit untersuchte, berichtete, hatte Law das Schreiben über einen Bekannten inoffiziell dem CS-Secretary of War überbringen lassen (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 548). Gen Lee, der den Vorgang untersuchte, beurteilte die Vorwürfe als sehr schwer und hält zur Klärung ein Kriegsgerichtsverfahren für unumgänglich (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 549). Davis verweigerte die Durchführung des Verfahrens, ordnete die Entlassung von Law aus dem Arrest und dessen Wiedereinsetzung als Brigadekommandeur an (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 548). General Robert E. Lee informierte Longstreet von dieser Entscheidung der Richmond Behörden; Longstreet sah sich als Korpskommandeur außerstande, diese Entscheidung zu akzeptieren und "verräterisches Verhalten" eines ihm untergebenen Offiziers zu dulden; er ordnete daraufhin die erneute Verhaftung Law's an und unterrichtete Gen. Lee über seine Entscheidung schriftlich; zugleich bat er um Entlassung für den Fall, daß das Kriegsgerichtsverfah­ren gegen Law nicht durchgeführt werde. Daraufhin wurde Longstreet seines Kommandos enthoben und auf eine andere Position - Divisionskommandeur in der Army of Northern Virginia versetzt (Longstreet, a.a.O., S. 549). Nachdem auch Gen. Lee selbst invol­viert war, wurde die Angelegenheit von offizieller Seite niedergeschlagen. Longstreet berichtet, er habe erstmals wieder von der Af­faire gehört, durch einen Zeitungsartikel Law's in der Nachkriegszeit (Longstreet, a.a.O., s. 549).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wily: Photographic History, a.a.O., vol. I, S. 1301 (BrigGen Law und sein Brigade-Stab

- Penny / Laine: Struggle für the Round Tops, a.a.O., S. 2

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Law, Evander McIvor: Papers 1860-1864 (Microfilm, originals privately); Manuscripts Department Library of the University of North Carolina, Southern Historical Collection, Chapel Hill / North Carolina

- Law, Evander McIver: "The Struggle for the Round Top." B & L, a.a.O., vol. III, S. 318-330

- Law, Evander McIver: “The Confederate Revolution.” Essay, 1890. Law’s essay encompasses more than the American Civil War to include Colonial history, the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, Louisiana Purchase, and the Continental Congress (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, 41008 Miscellaneous reel 5314. 1 reel. Microfilm)

- Longstreet, James: From Manassas to Appomattox

- Penny, Morris Penny and J. Gary Laine: Law's Alabama Brigade in the War between the Union and the Confederacy (White Mane); 480 pp, Maps, Photos, Rosters, Notes, Biblio. Law's Brigade comprised 5 Alabama Regiments who were known for their valor in combat, charging in seven of ten battles. Details of the feud between Law and Longstreet.

- Penny, Morris and J. Gary Laine: Struggle for the Round Tops: Law's Alabama Brigade at the Battle of Gettysburg; White Mane - 272 pp (Law's Brigade comprised 5 Alabama Regiments who were known for their valor in combat, charging in seven of ten battles. Details of the fighting around Devil's Den, Devil's Kitchen and Little Round Top, Maps, Illustrations, Biblio, Index), Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik50/12

 

 

Law, J. G:

CS-+++; 154th Tennessee Infantry (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 85)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Law, J. G..: "Diary of J. G. Law." Southern Historical Society Papers, vol. 10 (April-May 1883), pp. 297-303; vol. 10 (October 1883), pp. 460-465

 

 

Lawler, Michael Kelly:

US-BrigGen; 16.11.1814, County Kildare, Ireland 26.7.1882, nr Equality IL; Emigrated to US 1816, Mexican war. Occupation: far­mer, merchant. Post-War Occupation: Farmer.

 

June 1861 Col. of 18th Illinois Infantry. Im November 1861 in der Brigade von Richard *Oglesby in Südost-Missouri eingesetzt ge­gen die Partisanentruppen von Jeff *Thompson (vgl. Hicken, Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 19). Fort Donelson (w), served in Kentucky and Tennessee, November 1862 appointed Brig. Gen. of Volunteers, commanded 2nd Brigade 14th Division/XIII Corps McClernand in Vicksburg campaign, Port Gibson, Champion’s Hill, Big Black River Bridge (Dana, Recollections, a.a.O., S. 55), ser­ved in Louisiana and Texas in the Dept. of the Gulf.

 

 

Lawrence, Elijah C.:

US-Lt; 54th Ohio Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Shiloh am 6.4.1862; nach 9:00 war Lawrence eingesetzt im Rahmen der Skirmis­hers-Line der 54th Ohio Infantry am Locust Grove Run (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 198 mit Karte S. 194).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lawrence, Elijah C.: "Stuart's Brigade at Shiloh." Massachusetts Mollus, vol 2 (1900), S. 489-496

 

 

Lawrence, Dr. George W.:

CS-Surgeon; Dr. med; im Frühjahr 1862 war Dr. Lawrence Medical Director von Hardee's Corps (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 126).

 

 

Lawrence, James:

US-Captain; Co I, 61st Illinois Infantry, dated 1863, Helena and Little Rock (Pulaski County)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lawrence, James: Letters dated 1863, Helena and Little Rock (Pulaski County); in: Chicago Historical Society: Selected Arkansas manuscripts, 1724-1883; 1 roll, Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Lawson, George:

CS-Pvt; Carrington's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Charlottesville Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 33).

 

 

Lawson, George C.:

CS-++++

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

Lawson, George C.: Papers (in Robert Shaw Collection); Atlanta Historical Society, Atlanta/Georgia

 

 

Lawson, Jack:

CS-Kapitän; 18.8.1805 in Newton Le Willows/England-+++; 1825 nach Amerika ausgewandert; Ingenieur; zunächst als Eisenbahn­ingenieur in Baltimore, dann im Westen; Schiffseigner und Kapitän des Dampfers "Cherokee" auf dem Tennessee River und Missis­sippi bis zum Kriegsausbruch; im Bürgerkrieg: zunächst CS-Schiffsoffizier auf dem Gun Boat "General Polk"; Battle of Belmont; dann bis Mai 1863 Kapitän des Transportdampfers CSS-Chasm; eingesetzt bei Vicksburg, Red River; Nachkriegszeit in Paducah, wo er noch 1897 lebte (vgl. Confederate Veteran Vol. V [1897], S. 3)

 

Photo:

- Confederate Veteran Vol V (1897), S. 3

 

 

Lawton, Alexander Robert:

CS-BrigGen; 4.11.1818-2.7.1896; aus dem Beaufort District, South Carolina; West Point 1839 (13/31); aus der Armee auf eigenen Wunsch 1840 ausgeschieden; 1840-1842 Studium an der Harvard Law School; anschließend Rechtsanwalt in Savannah / Georgia (Boatner, a.a.O., S. 473); verheiratet mit Sarah Gilbert Alexander; Schwager von BrigGen Edward Porter Alexander (vgl. Alexander: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 4 und Anm. 4 S. 556). Lawton war aktiv in der Ga. Miliz; zeitweise Präsident Augusta & Sav­annah Railroad Eisenbahngesellschaft; Mitglied der Georgia Legislative (1855-56) und des Georgia State Senate (1860); einer der führenden Befürworter der Sezession; noch vor der Sezession des Staates Georgia besetzte Lawton auf Anweisung von Governor Brown Fort Pulaski; Col 1st Georgia Infantry; BrigGen 13.4.1861; Kommandeur der Georgia Küstenverteidigung; im Juni 1862 ein­gesetzt im Shenandoah Valley unter Stonewall Jackson; Seven Days Battle; Teilnahme als Brigadekommandeur an Jackson's Vorstoß gegen Pope's Army of Virginia Anfang August 1862 und am Battle of Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 in *Winder's Division.

 

Die Unterstellung Lawton's unter BrigGen Charles Sidney *Winder war problematisch, weil Lawton nach dem Prinzip der Ancienni­tät Vorrang im Divisionskommando gehabt hätte, denn "he outranked Winder by almost a full year of precedence in date of com­mission (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 40). Winder war zudem erkrankt und nicht voll dienstfähig (vgl. Krick, a.a.O., S. 40; Ro­bertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 127). Winder verfügte demgegenüber über weit gespannte Beziehungen, einige seiner Refe­renzen waren 'informal' (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 40). Sein Großvater war Edward Lloyd V, Governor von Maryland und Großgrundbesitzer. Seine Mutter war Elizabeth Tayloe Lloyd (1800-1880), Winder's Vater war Edward S. Winder, ein Army Of­fizier, verstorben 1840. CS-General John Henry Winder war sein Onkel. CS-Admiral Franklin Buchanan war mit der Schwester von Win­der's Mutter verheiratet. Winder war verwandt mit Francis Scott Key und CS-Gen Lloyd Tilghman (vgl. Krick, Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 402 Anm. 46). Trotz der Erkrankung Winder's bestätigte Jackson vor dem Battle of Cedar Mountain Winder im Divisions­kommando, indem er anordnete, daß Lawton das Kommando über den Train erhielt, und damit hinter der Front eingesetzt wurde (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 40; 62; Howard, McHenry: Recollections of a Maryland Confederate Soldier and Staff Offi­cer under Johnston, Jackson, and Lee, a.a.O., S. 165, 166).

 

Teilnahme am Battle of 2nd Manassas, er übernahm an Stelle des verwundeten *Ewell das Kommando über Ewell's Division; Divisi­onskommandeur Ewell's Division, verwundet in Antietam (vgl. zum Einsatz von Lawton's Brigade: Frassanito: Antietam Photogra­phic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 96, mit Photo des Einsatzortes S. 94); dienstuntauglich bis Mai 1863; In August 1863, Lawton became the Confederacy's second Quartermaster-General (vgl. wikipedia, Stichwort Alexander R. Lawton, Abruf v. 6.4.2017; a.A. Eicher Longest Night, a.a.O., S. 409: in August 1863 Lawton was assigned as Quartermaster General). Although he brought energy and resourcefulness to the position, he was unable to solve the problem of material shortages and poorly regulated railroads. Sseit 17.2.1864 gegen seinen Protest Quar­termaster General bis Kriegs­ende; Nachkriegszeit: Rechtsanwalt; Demokratischer Politiker; er scheiterte bei den Wahlen zum US-Se­nate 1880; 1882 President der American Bar Association; 1887-89 Botschafter in Österreich.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Alexander: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 4 und Anm. 4 S. 556

- Boatner, a.a.O., S. 473

- Hotchkiss: Make Me a Map, a.a.O., S. 284 Anm. 17

- Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 40, 402 Anm. 46

- Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 127

 

 

Lay, George W.:

CS-LtCol; West Point 1942 (+++/+++); Nachfolger von Col. Thomas *Jordan als Leiter des Agentenrings um Rose Greenhow (Tid­well, a.a.O., S. 63).

 

 

Leach, Elijah S.:

CS-Pvt, Co. B, 31st Virginia Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 33).

 

Photo:

CS-Pvt Elijah S. Leach, Co. B, 31st Virginia Infantry Regiment

 

 

Leach, James:

US-Pvt; Co. A, 8th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M5839 Roll 52; vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 393).

 

 

Leadbetter, Danville:

CS-BrigGen; 1811-66; West Point 1836 (3/49); ++++ für kurze Zeit in East Tennessee eingesetzt (vgl. Fisher: War at every Door, a.a.O., S. 57). Im Frühjahr 1862 wurde Leadbetter mit eintausend Soldaten von Knoxville / Tn. aus nach East-Tennessee verlegt, um die Bedrohung und Vertreibung von CS-Anhängern durch die East-Tennessee-Unionisten zu beenden (vgl. Fisher, a.a.O., S. 69). An­schließend bei der Verteidigung von Mobile Bay für kurze Zeit eingesetzt. Dann Chief Engineer der CS-Army of Tennessee. Er kon­struierte die CS-Stellungen bei Missionary Ridge (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 474). Bei Kriegsende floh Leadbetter nach Mexiko und starb 1866 in Kanada.

 

 

Leard, Sanders Walkers:

CS-Pvt; Co A 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Faucette Family: Genealogical information, enthält, u.a. den

 

 

Learned, Rufus F.:

CS-Pvt; Co. B, 10th Regiment Mississippi Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M232 Roll 23). Teilnahme an den Battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Franklin und Shiloh (vgl. McDonough: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 5).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- R. F. Learned to D. W. Reed, Mar. 22, 1904; Miscellaneous MSS Collection, Shiloh National Military Park Library (SNMP)

 

 

Leasure, Daniel:

US-BrigGen; zunächst Captain, Co. H, 100th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 69).

 

Col 100th Pennsylvania Infantry seit 1861; Brigade Kommandeur 2nd Bull Run 29.8.1862 (100th Pennsylvania Infantry; 46th New York Infantry); während Grant's Vicksburg Campaign 1863 Brigadekommandeur 3rd Brigade (Leasure's Brigade) 1st Divi­sion Welsh (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg III 1145); sein Nachfolger als Regimentskommandeur war LtCol M. M. *Dawson; am 2. Tag des Battle of the Wilderness führte Leasure einen entscheidenden Gegenangriff vor Hancock's 2nd Army Corps (Porter, Campaining with Grant, a.a.O., S. 60).

 

Leasure held the rank of colonel in the IX Corps through most of the war. His regiment, the 100th Pennsylvania Regiment, was known as the "Roundheads" because it was recruited from descendents of the followers of Oliver Cromwell. The regiment first saw action in the command of Brig. Gen. Isaac I. Stevens at the Battle of Secessionville in South Carolina on June 16, 1862. Transferred to the Virginia theater of the war, Leasure participated in the Second Battle of Bull Run, and the Battle of Chantilly. Wounded at Second Bull Run he subsequently missed the Maryland Campaign. Leasure returned for the Battle of Fredericksburg where he took command of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division in the IX Corps. Moving to the Western Theater with IX Corps, Leasure continued in brigade command under Maj. Gen. John Parke during the Siege of Vicksburg and Blue Springs. Returning to command of the 100th Pennsylvania he took part in the Siege of Knoxville. Returning to Virginia, Leasure now commanded the 2nd Brigade, 1st Division in the IX Corps at the Battle of the Wilderness and the Battle of Spotsylvania. When division commander, Brig. Gen. Thomas G. Stevenson was killed during the fighting at Spotsylvania, Leasure was the ranking subordinate and took command of the division for 3 days until relieved of this capacity by Maj. Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden. Returning to command the 2nd Brigade, Leasure was wounded a few days later and never returned to field command. He was mustered out of the service on August 30, 1864. He received the brevet rank of brigadier general in 1865.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Leasure, Daniel: „Personal Observations and Experiences in the Pope Campaign in Virginia“; in: Glimpses of the Nation's Struggle. A Series of Papers Minnesota Commandery of the Military Legion of the United States (St. Paul, Minnesota, 1887), pp. 185-166

 

 

LeCain, William H.:

US-Second Lieutenant, Co. H, 19th Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 23; vgl. Waitt: Histo­ry of the Ni­neteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 20); aus Boston vgl. Waitt: Histo­ry of the Nineteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 21).

 

Eintritt in Co. H, 19th Massachusetts Infantry am 22.8.1861, resinged 26.10.1861 (vgl. Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2); beerd. Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington/VA, Plot: Sec: 3, Site: 1404 1/2 (vgl. www.findagrave).

 

 

Ledig, August:

US-Captain, Co. H, 21st Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry (3 months, 1861) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 69).

Captain August Ledig’s Company E, 75th Pennsylvania Infantry, raised seventy-eight men, of whom twenty-two men were forty­-years-old or older. The alphabetical rolls for German-born companies often listed where each soldier was born, naming town and pro­vince. Here, again, such companies displayed incredible homogeneity, for German units were almost entirely foreign-born and pro­vincially unique (vgl. Timothy J. Orr: “Calling Urban Men to Arms: Northern Cities Mobilize to Fight the Civil War”, Report to the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission Scholars-In-Residence Program June 19-July 1, 2006, n.p.; Archiv Ref Amerika­nischer Bür­gerkrieg Nr. 6).

 

 

Ledlie, James Hewett:

Born April 14 1832, Utica NY; Died August 15, 1882, Staten Island NY. Pre-War Civil engineer. Post-War Civil Engineer. War Invol­vement: May 1861 helped raise 19th New York Infantry - Maj., Lt. Col., December 1861 Col., regiment redesignated 3rd New York Artillery, service in North Carolina, December 1862 appointed BrigGen. of Volunteers (not confirmed by Senate until Ledlie had pul­led a few strings in October 1863), commanded 1st Division/IX Corps (poorly) at Petersburg; performed badly at the Crater, critici­sed by a court of inquiry, resigned January 1865. Despite continuing bad performance, his political connections assisted his advancem­ent.

 

 

LeDuc, William G.:

++-+++

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- LeDuc, William G.: Recollections of a Civil War Quartermaster (St. Paul / Minnesota: North Central Publishing Co., 1963)

 

 

Lee, Albert Lindley:

US-BrigGen; Born January 16 1834, Fulton NY; Died December 31 1907, New York NY; Pre-War: Lawyer, state supreme court jud­ge. Post War: Businessman. War Involvement: October 1861 Maj. in 7th Kansas Cavalry, served in Kansas and Western Missouri, Col 7th Kansas Cavalry; November 1862 appointed Brig. Gen. of Volunteers.

 

Während Grant's während Grant's erster Vicksburg Campaign im November 1862 Vorstoß nach Süden in Richtung *Grand Junction und Holly Springs führte Lee die Mounted Brigade des als rechter Flügel Grant's eingesetzten Corps Hamilton's (vgl. Bearss: Vicks­burg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 37); Lee unternahm am 5.11.1862 einen Aufklärungsvorstoß nach Lamar (zwischen Grand Junction und Holly Springs; vgl. Karte bei Davis Nr. 154; vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 37; OR Ser. I, Vol. XVII, pt. II, S. 320). wobei es bei Jumpertown zu ei­nem Schußwechsel mit CS-Cavalry kam, die nach Süden auswich (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 37).

 

Nach dem überraschenden Rückzug der CS-Truppen von der Tallahatchie Line am 1.12.1862 erhielt die US-Cavalry von Grant's Army of the Tennessee unter Col *Dickey den Befehl mit seiner Cavalry von Waterford (vgl. Karte bei Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I S. 58) die Verfolgung anzutreten, wobei Col Albert Lindley Lee's Brigade verstärkt durch die 3rd Michigan Cavalry vom Nordufer des Tallahatchie nach Süden vorstieß (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I S. 95).

 

Ab 12.12.1862 wurde Lee's Cavalry, verstärkt durch Sullivans's 2nd Infanteriebrigade aus Quinby's Division, zur Aufklärung vor Be­ginn von Grant's Overland Campaign eingesetzt, um zu klären, ob die CS-Truppen Holly Springs und Lumpkin's Mill geräumt hatten und ob die Eisenbahnbrücke über den Coldwater River noch intakt war (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I S. 61 ff).

 

Beim weiteren Vorstoß von Grant's Army of the Tennessee nach Süden Richtung Holly Springs ab 26.11.1862 faßte Grant seine Ka­vallerie in einer Kavallerie-Division unter Col T. Lyle *Dickey zusammen. Die 1st Brigade unter Albert Lindley Lee wurde dem Corps Hamilton's unterstellt (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I 72) und umfaßte folgenden Einheiten: 7th Kansas, 2nd und 4th Illinois, 2nd Battalion 2nd Iowa Cavalry (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I 72 Anm. 47).

 

Lee's Cavalry Brigade befand sich am 29.11.1862 während Grant’s Overland Campaign in *Ebenezer Church / Mississippi, und stieß (verstärkt durch BrigGen George W. Deitzler's Infantry Brigade) nach Süden zu den Tallahatchie-Brücken vor (vgl. Bearss: Vicks­burg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I S. 74).

 

Chief of staff to McClernand at Champion’s Hill and Big Black River Bridge, wounded in siege of Vicksburg, chief of cavalry in Dept. of the Gulf, commanded the cavalry in Red River campaign, performed no further substantial duties, resigned May 1865.

 

 

Lee, Arthur T.:

US-Captain; 8th US Infantry; Lee wurde mit seinen Soldaten beim Verlassen von Texas bei Kriegsausbruch im April 1861 auf dem Schiff USS 'Star of the West' auf Befehl von Earl Van Dorn, dem neuen CS-Befehlshaber im CS-Militärbezirk Texas unter Verstoß gegen die Bedingungen des 'Twiggs Surrender' gefangengenommen (vgl. Josephy: The Civil War in the West, a.a.O., S. 29).

 

 

Lee, Charles Cochrane:

† gef. 30.6.1862 Battle of Glendale/Seven Days Battle; CS-Col; 1861 LtCol 1st North Carolina Infantry Regiment (6 Month, 1861) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23); Teilnahme am Battle of Big Bethel am 10.6.1861 (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., S. 58). 1862 Col 37th North Carolina Infantry Regi­ment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 23). Im Battle of New Bern am 13.3.1862 kommandierte Col. C.C. Lee den linken Flü­gel der Brigade Hatch (vgl. McGee, David H.: 26th North Carolina Re­gimental History, http://www.26nc.org/History/26th-Regimen­tal-History/26th, S.24).

 

Lee graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York in 1856, and was assigned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Ordnance Department. Serving in that branch for the next three years, he resigned from the Army on July 31, 1859. When the Civil war started, he was residing in his native North Carolina, and offered his services to the new Confederacy. Mustered into the 1st North Carolina Infantry regiment, he participated in the conflict's first land battle at Big Bethel, Virginia on June 10, 1861. In No­vember 1861 he was promoted to Colonel and assigned to command the 37th North Carolina Infantry regiment. He led his men in the March 1862 New Berne Campaign and the May-June 1862 Peninsular Campaign, commanding a demi-brigade at the Battle of New Berne on March 14 and at the Battle of Hanover Court House on May 27. He was in command of his regiment during the Seven Days Battles in the last week of June 1862, and was mortally wounded on June 30, 1862 at the Battle of Glendale when he was struck by an artillery shell while leading his men in a charge on Union positions. His father, Stephen Lee, commanded the 16th North Carolina Infantry during the war, and his cousin, Stephen Dill Lee, would finish out the war as a Lieutenant General in the Confederate Army. Interred in Elmwood Cemetery, Charlotte, North Carolina, his family erected a cenotaph for him in Riverside Cemetery, Ashville, North Carolina (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Sohn von Col Stephen Lee (1801-1879) und Caroline Lee (1807-1855) (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Lee, Cassius F.:

CS-Helfer in Kanada; a distinguished citizen of Alexandria, Virginia, staunch Episcolian, and uncle of Robert E. Lee, was forced to leave his home because of his pro-Southern opinions. He arrived in Canada in late 1863 and established himself in Hamilton, Onta­rio, at the western end of Lake Ontario between Toronto and Niagara. There is no evidence that Lee was directly involved as an agent or operator, but it is clear that he provided support and acted as a message center. Messages could be sent to him, and he would know where the agent was currently located and could forward the message to the correct address. He may have been sent to Canada in pre­paration for the increased activity of 1864, but it is also possible that he made the move on his own initiative and that the Confedera­tes merely took advantage of the presence of somebody they could trust.

 

 

Lee, Edmund G. "Ned":

= Edwin Gray *Lee

 

CS-BrigGen; nach aA auch Edwin Grey *Lee (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 475; Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 17-18; Allardice: Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 177); LtCol 33rd Virginia Infantry (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 172). Lee kommandierte die 33rd Virginia Infantry im Battle von Cedar Mountain, nachdem der Regimentskommandeur John *Neff von BrigGen Winder unter Arrest gestellt worden war (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 172). Lee war Schwiegersohn von Gen William Nelson *Pendle­ton (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 166). Cousin von Robert E. Lee; 1862 Col. 33rd Virginia Infantry im Battle von Cedar Mountain (vgl. Battles and Leaders, Vol. II., a.a.O., S. 496); BrigGen seit Sept. 1864; nach Kanada entsandt als Confederate Com­missioner im Dezember 1864 (vgl Tidwell: Come Retribution, a.a.O., S. 22). Lee benutzte für seine verschlüsselten Berichte nach Richmond den Decknamen "Morton T. Bledsoe" bzw. "River s" (vgl. Tidwell, April 65, Confederate Covert Action, a.a.O., S. 36).

 

Photo:

- Allardice: Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 177

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 114, 166-67, 169, 172-73, 242, 290

- Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 17-18, 127 n, 132-33, 168, 174

 

 

Lee, Edwin Gray:

s. auch Edmund G. "Ned" *Lee

 

CS-BrigGen; nach aA auch Edmund G. "Ned" *Lee (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 114, 166-67, 169, 172-73, 242, 290); 27.5.1836 Leeland, Va. - 24.8.1870 Yellow Sulphur Springs, Va. Schulbesuch in Alexandria, Va.; Graduated am College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va.; anschließend Rechtsanwalt. Cousin von Robert E. Lee (vgl. Allardice: Generals in Gray, a.a.O., S. 177) und Cousin ersten Grades von George R. Bedinger (seinem späteren Assistenten in Kanada), die Familien Lee, Bedinger und A. R. Boteler waren Nachbarn in Shepherdstown, Va. (vgl. Tidwell: Come Retribution, a.a.O., S. 71). 1861 Lt 2nd Virginia Infantry, Aide im Stab von Stonewall Jackson bei Harper's Ferry im Juni / Juli 1861 (Allardice: Generals in Gray, a.a.O., S. 177); dann Major und LtCol 33rd Virginia Infantry (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 172). Teilnahme an der Valley Campaign, Seven Days Battles, 2nd Manassas, Antietam und Fredericksburg (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 177). Lee kommandierte die 33rd Virginia Infantry im Battle von Cedar Mountain, nachdem der Regimentskommandeur John *Neff von BrigGen Winder unter Arrest gestellt worden war (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 172). Lee war Schwiegersohn von Gen William Nelson *Pendleton (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 166). Cousin von Robert E. Lee; 1862 Col. 33rd Virginia Infantry im Battle von Cedar Mountain (vgl. Battles and Leaders, Vol. II., a.a.O., S. 496); im Dezember 1862 wegen Krankheit aus dem Dienst ausgeschieden. Wiedereintritt 1863 und Col in Rich­mond (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 177), wo er dem Torpedo-Bureau zugeordnet war (vgl. Tidwell: Come Retribution, a.a.O., S. 357). Am 17.5.1864 übernahm er das Kommando in Staunton, Va. (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 177). BrigGen am 23.9.1864 mit Rang vom 20.9.186. Wegen Erkrankung erhielt er eine ab 28.9.1864 eine sechsmonatige Beurlaubung. Die Bestätigung seiner Ernennung zum BrigGen wurde vom CS-Senat am 24.2.1865 abgelehnt; Lee wurde dennoch in den Ranglisten weiterhin als BrigGen geführt (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 177); zusammen mit seiner erreichten kurz vor der Senatsentscheidung mit einem Blockadebrecher im Februar 1864 Montreal / Kanada, wo beide bis Frühjahr 1866 blieben (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 178). Er wurde nach aA nach Kanada entsandt als Confederate Commissioner im Dezember 1864 (vgl Tidwell: Come Retribution, a.a.O., S. 22). Lee benutzte für seine verschlüs­selten Berichte nach Richmond den Decknamen "Morton T. Bledsoe" bzw. "Rivers" (vgl. Tidwell, April 65, Confederate Covert Ac­tion, a.a.O., S. 36). Lee litt an einer Lungenkrankheit, an deren Folgen er am 24.8.1870 im Alter von 34 Jahren in Yellow Sulphur Springs verstarb. Beerdigt in Lexington, Va. (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 178).

 

Photo:

- Allardice: Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 177

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 114, 166-67, 169, 172-73, 242, 290

- Tidwell,: Come Retribution, a.a.O., S. 22, 49, 71, 200, 203, 249, 250, 279, 280, 284, 288, 304, 305, 357, 407, 419, 430

 

Lee, Fitzhugh:

CS-MajGen; 1835-1905; Neffe von Robert E. Lee; West Point 1856 (45/49); Lee entging knapp der Entlassung aus West Point wegen seines Verhaltens, während Robert E. Lee Superintendent von West Point war. US-Berufsoffizier; eingesetzt an der Frontier und in den Indianerkämpfen, hierbei schwer verwundet. Anschließend Taktiklehrer in West Point. Lee schied als 1st Lieutenant am 12.5.1861 aus der US Army aus und trat im selben Rang in die CSA ein. LtCol 1st Virginia Cavalry im August 1861. Col im Mai 1862; Teilnahme an Stuart's Raid um McClellan während der Peninsular Campaign 1862 (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 475). Briga­dekommandeur der 2nd Cavalry Brigade (1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th und 9th Virginia Cavalry) in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia am 28.7.1862 (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Dispatches, a.a.O., S. 42 Anm. 2).

 

Beurteilung: directly below Wade Hampton in seniority (though seventeen years his junior) was Fitzhugh Lee, Stuart’s warm friend and Old Army colleague. A West Pointer like Stuart, Fitz Lee had made a less distinguished academic record; at the Academy, where he developed a compact, muscular physique and a hail-fellow manner, he seemed chiefly interested in gaining a reputation for convi­viality, good horsemanship, and athletic prowess. A close acquaintance recalled „the strain of jollity pervading him.... he had hosts of friends, and no end of enjoyment.“ Another companion remarked: „he had a prevailing habit of irrepressible good humor which made any occasion of seriousness in him seem like affectation.“ Fitz was described as having „a square head and short neck upon broad shoulders, a merry eye, and a joyous voice of great power; ruddy, full bearded, and overflowing with animal spirits.“ As a tactician, he had performed successfully both in semi-independent operations and under Stuart’s direct supervision. Although no strategic geni­us, he was a strong shoulder upon whom Stuart leaned in times of peril and doubt (vgl. Longacre, The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 28). Eine schwere Rheumatismus-Erkrankung führte zu einer längeren Unterbrechung seiner Karriere; die Brigade Lee mit fünf Regimentern wurde während Lee's Abwesenheit vom dienstältesten Offizier Col Thomas T. *Munford geführt (vgl. Longacre, The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 28).

 

Die Brigade bestand aus folgenden fünf Regimentern und dem 1st Maryland Battalion (vgl. Longacre, The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 28): 1st Maryland Battalion (Maj Harry Gilmor, Maj Ridgely Brown), 1st Virginia Cavalry (Col James H. Drake), 2nd Vir­ginia Cavalry (Col Thomas T. Munford, LtCol James W. Watts, Maj Cary Breckinridge), 3rd Virginia Cavalry (Col Thomas H. Owen), 4th Virginia Cavalry (Col Williams C. Wickham; Capt. William B. Newton), 5th Virginia Cavalry (Col Thomas L. Rosser).

 

Cavalry units were sometimes used to screen infantry movements and to help achieve tactical surprise. The most famous example of this use of cavalry was the successful screening of Stonewall Jackson's flank march at Chancellorsville by General Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Brigade (vgl. McWhiney/Jamieson: Attack and Die, a.a.O., S. 133).

 

Photo:

MajGen Fitzhugh Lee (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3e/Fitzhugh_Lee)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lee, Fitzhugh: General Lee. A. Biography of Robert E. Lee (DaCapo Press: Reprint of 1894 original); Introduction by Gary Gal­lagher; 478 pp; 2 illustrations; 3 maps

- Longacre, The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 28

- Nichols, James L.: General Fitzhugh Lee. A. Biography (H. E. Howard; 2nd Edition ).

 

 

Lee, George Washington Custis:

CS-MajGen; ältester Sohn von Robert E. Lee und Mary Lee; Bruder von CS-MajGen William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) *Lee.

 

1832- † 1913; aus Virginia; USMA 1854 (1/46); Engrs. He was engaged in river and harbor improvements and served in the office of the Chief of Engrs. in Washington until he resigned 2.5.1861 to join the Confederacy. Commissioned Captain of CSA Engrs. am 1.7. 1861, he superintended the fortifications of Richmond. 31.8.1861 Col of Cavalry and ADC to President Jefferson Davis. His war ser­vice was almost entirely in this post and he was appointed CS-BrigGen am 25.6.1864 und MajGen am 21.10.1864. He trained the lo­cal defense brigade in the Dept. Of Richmond and commanded it during the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren Raid. Under Ewell, he retreated from Richmond toward Appomattox, only to be captured at Sailor's Creek. After the war he was professor of engineering at Virginia military Institute, when he succeeded his father as president of Washington & Lee University, serving until 1897 (vgl. Boatner: Civil War Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 475-76).

 

Als Col Adjutant von Präsident Jefferson Davis (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 144); er begleitete Jefferson Davis auf seiner Inspektionsreise nach Tennessee und Mississippi im Dezember 1862 (vgl. Catton: Never Call Retreat, a.a.O., S. 471 n. 1).

 

 

Lee, John C.:

US-Sergeant; Co. F, 96th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 12; vgl. Partridge: History of the Ninety-sixth Regiment Ill. Vol. Inf., a.a.O., S. 60).

 

 

Lee, John Calvin:

US-BrigGen; Col 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry; am 11.9.1861 wurde Lee bei der Aufstellung der 55th Ohio Infantry commissioned as Major (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 18) und am 21.11.1861 zum Col des Regiments befördert (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 19).

 

Im Battle of Chancellorsville gehörte das 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry zur 2nd Brigade BrigGen Nathaniel C. McLean, First Divisi­on BrigGen Charles C. Devens, 11th Army Corps MajGen O. O. Howard (vgl. B&L, vol. III, a.a.O., S. 236; vgl. Hamlin: Battle of Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 40).

 

John Calvin Lee (January 7, 1828 – March 24, 1891) was an American Republican politician who served as the ninth Lieutenant Go­vernor of Ohio from 1868 to 1872. Lee was born January 7, 1828 at Brown Township, Delaware County, Ohio. He received a public education and attended Central College Franklin County for one year, went to Western Reserve College in 1845 and graduated in 1848. He taught school for two years, then began study of law at Atwater, Ohio, where he was admitted to the bar July 6, 1852. He ran for Common Pleas Judge in 1857, but lost (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Lee).

 

John C. Lee was residing at Tiffin, at the beginning of the rebellion, engaged in successful practice of the law. On the 25th of Novem­ber, 1861, he was commissioned Colonel of the 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry, and soon after was ordered to West Virginia. He served for a short time as president of a court-martial convened by order of General Rosecrans at Charleston, and then joined his regiment at Romney. Being the senior officer he was placed in command of the district of South Potomac by General Schenck. He marched under Schenck to the relief of Milroy at McDowell in May, 1862. He also participated in the Shenandoah Campaign which culmina­ted in the Battle of Cross Keys. He was in the battles of Freeman's Ford, White Sulphur Springs, Warrenton, Bristow's Station, New Baltimore, New Market, Thoroughfare Gap, Gainesville, Chantilly, and the Second Bull Run, in all of which he received the special commendation of his superior officers. At Chancellorsville, in 1863, he was on the right when the enemy made such a furious assault on the eleventh corps, and by his determined efforts, aided by Orland Smith of the Seventy-Third Ohio and McGroarty of the Sixty-First, did much to stay the tide of Rebel success. On the account of severe illness in his family General Lee unwillingly tendered his resignation, which was received May 18, 1863. When the National Guard was called out he was commissioned Colonel of the One Hundred and Sixty-Fourth Ohio, which did service around the fortifications of Washington. He was mustered out August 27, 1864, and was brevetted Brigadier-General March 1865 (vgl. Reid, Whitelaw. "John C. Lee". Ohio in the War Her Statesmen Generals and Soldiers, a.a.O., S. 972).

 

Col. Lee trat am 8.5.1863 zurück, „smarting under the storm of unjust criticism [Anm.:nach dem Battle of Chancellorsville] which now broke upon the Eleventh Corps“ and left the army (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volun­teer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 83).

 

In 1867, General Lee was nominated for Lieutenant Governor after Samuel Galloway declined the nomination. He won that year, and again in 1869. In 1868, Lee was Delegate-at-large to the Republican National Convention, and in 1872 Presidential Elector-at-large. In 1877 he was appointed United States District Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio, for the term ending 1881. He died at To­ledo on March 24, 1891, and is buried at Greenlawn Cemetery in Tiffin (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Lee).

 

Photo:

- John C. Lee, 9th Lieutenant Governor of Ohio

- Col John C. Lee (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 6)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Reid, Whitelaw. "John C. Lee". Ohio in the War Her Statesmen Generals and Soldiers (Cincinnati: The Robert Clarke Company, 1895)

 

 

Lee, John C.:

US-Corporal, Co. F, 96th Illinois Infantry; † 22.4.1886 im Alter von 46 J.; beerd. Longhollow Cemetery, Jo Daviess County / Illinois (vgl. www.findagrave.com)

 

 

Lee John C.:

US-Pvt, Chicago Mercantile Battery, Illinois Light Battery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 22); die Einheit wird auch als Col­ley's Independant Battery Light Artillery bezeichnet (vgl. Inschrift auf dem Grabstein von Lee auf dem Leavenworth National Ceme­tery, Leavenworth / Kansas); † 14.2.1903, beerd. Leavenworth National Cemetery, Leavenworth / Kansas (vgl. www. findagrave.­com).

 

 

Lee, Mary Curtis:

Ehefrau von Robert E. Lee; Enkelin von Martha Washington, der Ehefrau von George Washington. Sie lebte nach Kriegsausbruch und ihrer Flucht aus "Arlington House" bei Washington in ihrer 2. Villa bei White House, VA, wo Martha und George Washington geheiratet hatten. Während McClellan's Vorrücken nach Süden im Frühjahr 1862 und Joseph E. Johnston's Rückzug nach Süden, konnte sie nicht rechtzeitig fliehen und blieb deshalb zunächst hinter den US-Linien zurück. Dr. Macon arrangierte daraufhin eine si­chere Rückkehr nach Süden unter US-Kavallerie Begleitung durch die Kampflinien (vgl. Rhodes, Elisha Hunt:: All for the Union, a.a.O., S. 62, 245 Anm. 17).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Kane, Harriett T.: The Lady of Arlington (New York: Doubleday, 1954)

 

 

Lee, Philip Lightfoot:

CS-Captain; aus Shepherdsville / Kentucky; er brachte im Juli 1861 106 Soldaten aus Shepherdsville nach *Camp Boone (vgl. Davis: Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 14). Captain Co. C in der 2nd Kentucky Infantry (vgl. Davis: Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 16).

 

Photo:

- Davis: The Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., nach S. 222

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- National Archives Washington: Compiled Service Record von Philip L. Lee, Record Group 109

 

 

Lee, Robert Edward:

(1807-1891), General der Südstaaten; zur Haltung Col. Lee's bei Ausbruch der Sezession in Texas vgl.: Darrow, Caroline Baldwin: Recollection of the Twiggs Surrender; in Johnson / Buel, Battles and Leaders, Vol I From Sumter to Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 36. 1862 Mili­tärberater von Südstaaten-Präsident Jefferson Davis; Lee war ein politischer General, beteiligt an nahezu allen wichtigen politischen Entscheidungen seit 1862 nach seiner Ernennung zum kommandierenden General der Army of Northern Virginia (vgl. Rollins: Pickett's Charge, a.a.O., S. xix; Freeman: Lee. A Biography, vol. III,

 

Eine gute Beschreibung der Person Lee's befindet sich bei Fremantle, Three Month in the Southern States, a.a.O., S. 248-49.

 

In der Vorkriegszeit dient Lee erfolgreich in Mexico und war Superintendent in West Point von 1852-1855 (Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 13: "he was the personification of dignity, justice, and kindness, and was respected and admired as the ideal of a commanding officer"); im Herbst 1861 war er für *Cheat Mountain, WVa. verantwortlich; im Winter 1861/62 war Lee für die Küs­tenverteidigung von South Carolina und Georgia verantwortlich; Lee befehligte von 1862 bis 1865 die Truppen in Virginia; von Fe­bruar 1862 bis April 1865 Oberbefehlshaber der Armee der Südstaaten; er hatte den Ruf eines Meisters der Strategie und Taktik. Sei­ne Spezialität war eine Offensiv-Defensiv-Strategie, die er erstmals während der Shenandoah-Kampagne anwandte. Seine Offensiv­truppen wurden hierbei immer von „Stonewall“ Jackson befehligt, bis zu dessen Tod 1863.

 

Lee, der 1861 54 Jahre zählte, war der Sohn eines Helden aus dem Unabhängigkeitskrieg, Sproß einer der angesehensten Familien Virginias, ein Gentleman, wie er im Buche steht, und offenbar ohne Fehl und Tadel, falls man seine besondere :Zurückhaltung, die nur höchst selten eine Gefühlsregung den Mantel der Würde durchbrechen ließ, nicht als Fehler werten will. Seit er 1829 als zweiter seiner Klasse die West-Point-Akademie absolviert hatte, gehörte er der US-Armee an. Bis Februar 1861 in Fort Mason, Texas statio­niert, von wo er nach der Sezessionserklärung von Texas am 1.2.1861 auf Befehl von Gen Scott nach Washington zurückkehrte. Lee traf am 15.2.1861 in San Antonio, Texas auf seiner Reise nach Washington ein, wo er von *Twiggs' Surrender erfuhr. Lee muß von der Entwicklung sehr bewegt gewesen sein. Wie Caroline Darrow (vgl. Darrow, Caroline Baldwin: Recollection of the Twiggs Sur­render; in Johnson / Buel, Battles and Leaders, Vol I From Sumter to Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 36) berichtet, war Lee die ganze Nacht wach und ging betend in seinem Zimmer im US-Hauptquartier auf und ab. Lee erklärte seine Position in verschiedenen Gesprächen wäh­rend seines Aufenthalts von einer Woche Dauer in San Antonio als 'neutral' und reiste dann befehlsgemäß nach Washington weiter (vgl. Darrow, a.a.O., S. 36). Lees hervorragende Leistungen im Mexikanischen Krieg, seine Erfahrung als Pionier- und Kavallerieof­fizier sowie als Superintendent von West Point wurde am 16. März 1861 mit der Beförderung zum Colonel honoriert. Der komman­dierende General Winfield Scott hielt Lee gar für den besten Offizier der ganzen Armee Im April 1861 drängte Scott Präsident Lin­coln, Lee den Oberbefehl über die frisch ausgehobenen Unionstruppen zu übertragen. Scott, der wie Lee aus Virginia stammte, hegte die Hoffnung, daß Lee gleich ihm den Streitkräften, denen er sein Leben gewidmet hatte, die Treue halten würde. Lee hatte aus seiner Abneigung gegen die Sklaverei nie einen Hehl gemacht, ja sie 1856 als »moralisches und politisches Übel“ bezeichnet. Bis zu dem Tage, an dem Virginia aus der Union ausschied (17.4.1861 Parlamentsabstimmung 88:55 Stimmen für die Sezession) hatte er sich zu­dem gegen die Sezession ausgesprochen. Lee lehnte die Ernennung zum US-Oberbefehlshaber aus Loyalität zu Virginia ab.

 

Lee wird am 22.4.1861 zum Kommandierenden General der Truppen Virginias ernannt und kurz darauf zum BrigGen befördert.

 

Lee und Präsident Davis:

Obwohl Davis nicht immer auf den ersten Blick die Absichten und Ziele Lee's verstand, hatten die beiden CS-Führer einen offen Austausch ihrer Ansichten. Lee hat sicherlich seine Informationen und Ansichten so bereitwillig mitgeteilt wie er sollte, aber es gibt keinen Zweifel daran, daß er alle Fragen von Davis sofort offen beantwortete (vgl. Coddington: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 599n4).

 

Lee und Meade:

von der Kommandoübernahme durch Meade soll Lee durch den Scout *Harrison erfahren haben (vgl. Marshall: Lee's Aide-De-Camp, a.a.O., S. 219). Demgegenüber berichtet Fremantle (vgl. Fremantle: Diary, a.a.O., S. 199), daß Lee erst am 30.6.1863 vom Kommandowechsel erfahren hat (Zitat nach Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 596 Anm. 37).

 

 

Lee und Pope:

Lee hatte für MajGen John Pope nur Verachtung übrig. Er kannte Pope aus der Vorkriegs-Armee. Als er hörte, daß einer seiner Nef­fen, Louis Marshall (vgl. Krick, Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 43) auf Seiten der Nordstaaten im Stab Pope's tätig war, bemerkte er, er könne diesem zwar vergeben, auf Seiten der Nordstaaten zu kämpfen, nicht aber daß er Pope diene (vgl. Eisenschiml: The Celebrated Case, a.a.O., S. 43: Krick: Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 7).

 

 

zur Kritik an Lee's Strategie:

- Connelly, Thomas L.: The Marble Man: Robert E. Lee and his Image in American Society (1977)

- Thomas L. Connelly and Archer Jones - THE POLITICS OF COMMAND: FACTIONS AND IDEAS IN CONFEDERATE STRAT­EGY - LSU Press - Connelly and Jones illustrate how Davis' decisions were affected by officers in the field, politicians, the considerable clout of the western bloc and its network of informal associations, the input of Robert E. Lee, the pressure brought to bear by P. G. T. Beauregard, and Davis' own changing concept of the departmental command system.

 

 

Familie:

°° mit Mary Curtis Lee (Enkelin von Martha Washington, der Ehefrau von George Washington); Vater von CS-MajGen George Wa­shington Custis *Lee, von CS-MajGen William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) *Lee; der jüngste Sohn war Captain Robert E. *Lee jun. (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 45).

 

Literatur zu Lee, allgemein:

- Adams, Charles Francis: Lee at Appomattox, and other Papers (1902)

- Alexander, Bevin: Robert E. Lee's Civil War (Adams Media, 1998); 338 pp, Index, Biblio, Notes, Photos, Maps. Alexander’s se­cond Civil War book (his first was Lost Victories, about Stonewall Jackson). This latest title looks behind the scenes at the strategies and decisions of the West Point-trained officers who were forced to chose sides during the conflict. Bevin's recreates each battle in detail, paying special attention to strategies and tactics from Seven Days to Appomattox Court House. He gives full credit to Lee for his outstanding defensive strategies and his ability to hold together a disorganized and poorly equipped force for three grueling years, but also takes on Lee’s decisions to stage the large-scale attacks that led to Lee’s defeat.

- Allen, William: "Memoranda of Conversation with General Robert E. Lee", reprinted in: - Gallagher, Gary W. (ed.): Lee, the Sol­dier (Lincoln: University of Nebrasca Press, 1996), S. 14

- Bradford, Gamaliel: Lee the American (Boston, 1912)

- Dowdey, Clifford and Louis H. Manarin (eds.): The Wartime Papers of R. E. Lee (Boston: Little, Brown and Comp., 1961)

- Freeman, Douglass Southall: R. E. Lee (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1935)

- Freeman, Douglas Southall (ed.): Lee's Dispatches: Unpublished Letters of General Robert E. Lee, CSA, to Jefferson Davis and the War Department of the Confederate States of Amerika, 1862-65 (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1957 edition)

- Gallagher, Gary W.: Lee and his Generals in War and Memory (LSU Press); Examines Robert E. Lee, his principal subordinates, the treatment they received in Confederate military history, and the continuing influence of Lost Cause arguments in the late 20th centu­ry. Historical images of Lee and his lieutenants were shaped to a remarkable degree by reminiscences and writings of ex-Confedera­tes who formulated what became known as the Lost Cause interpretation of the conflict. Lost Cause advocates usually portrayed Lee as a perfect Christian warrior and Stonewall Jackson as his peerless; and often explained Lee's failings as the result of inept perfor­mances by other generals. Many historians throughout the 20th century have approached Lee and other Confederate military figures within an analytical framework heavily influenced by the Lost Cause school.

- Gallagher, Gary W. (ed.): Lee, the Soldier (Lincoln: University of Nebrasca Press, 1996); 648 pp. Combining unpublished manus­cripts, six new essays by leading historians, more than a dozen important essays and an annotated bibliography of 200 key titles, this book lays out the major debates and enables a full understanding of Lee's contribution to the Confederate Cause; Illustrated; Maps

- Heth, Henry: Letter to J. William Jones, June 1877, "Causes of Lee's Defeat at Gettysburg;" Southern Historical Papers, William Jo­nes et al. (eds.), 1876-1930, Richmond 4 (1877): 153-54

- Krick, Robert K.: "Lee at Chancellorsville", in: Lee the Soldier, ed. Gary W. Gallagher (Lincoln: University of Nebrasca Press, 1996)

- Lee, Captain Robert E.: Recollections and Letters of General Robert E. Lee (Garden City, N. J.: Garden City Publishing, 1924)

- Lee, Robert E.: The Wartime Papers of Robert E. Lee Clifford Dowdey (New York: Da Capo Press, 1961)

- Long, Armistead L.: Memoirs of Robert E. Lee (New York, 1886)

- Longstreet, James: "Lee in Pennsylvania," in: Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 417

- Longstreet, James: Lee's Invasion in Pennsylvania"; in: B & L III: 245-247

- Woodworth, Steven E.: Davis and Lee At War (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995)

 

 

Lee, Robert E. jun.:

CS-Captain; jüngster Sohn von Gen. Robert E. Lee und Mary Curtis Lee (Enkelin von Martha Washington, der Ehefrau von George Washington); Bruder von CS-MajGen George Washington Custis *Lee und von CS-MajGen William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) *Lee (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 45).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Captain Robert E. Lee, Recollections and Letters of General Robert E. Lee (Garden City, NY, 1924)

 

 

Lee, Stephen Dill:

CS-MajGen; 1833-1908; aus South Carolina; nicht verwandt mit den Lees aus Virginia; West Point 1854 (17/46); Artillerieoffizier; Einsatz an der Frontier und im Seminole War; trat aus der US-Army als 1st Lieutenant im Februar 1861 aus. Captain der South Caro­lina Troops, dann Beauregard's ADC während der Beschießung von Fort Sumter. Befördert zum Major CSA im November 1861. Ar­tillery. Teilnahme an den Schlachten von Seven Pines, Savage's Station, Malvern Hill, 2nd Bull Run und Antietam. Inzwischen zum Col befördert; kommandierte unter Stuart die 4th Virginia Cavalry (vgl. Stuart's Report OR 12 [2] S. 120), die an Skirmishes vom 21.7.-16.8.1862 im Raum zwischen Hanover Court House und Fredericksburg beteiligt war und der u.a. die 4th Virginia Cavalry an­gehörte (vgl. Stuart's Report OR 12 [2] S. 119).

 

Col Stephen D. Lee kommandierte ein unabhängiges Artillery Battalion in Antietam (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 477; vgl. Priest: Antietam, a.a.O., S. 2). Lee setzte die vier Batteries seines Artillery Battalions auf dem Plateau near the Dunker Church with a clear line of fire to the north and east (vgl. Sears: Landscape turned Red, a.a.O., S. 182).

 

6.11.1862 BrigGen; abkommandiert nach Vicksburg. Der für die Verteidigung der Stadt verantwortli­che Smith übertrug Lee am 25.12.1862 die Verteidigung der Walnut Hills Area am Südufer des Yazoo (Karte bei: Bearss: Hardluck Ironclad, a.a.O., S. 113) ge­gen das Army Corps Sherman's (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 152 ff). Lee kommandierte die CS-Cavalry in Mississippi und Alabama 1863 und 1864 (vgl. Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 333).

 

Photo:

- vgl. Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, vol. 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 44, 333

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 152

- Hattaway, Herman: General Stephen D. Lee (Jackson, 1976)

- Lee, Stephen D.: “Details Important Work by Two Confederate Telegraph Operators, Christmas Eve, which Prevented the Complete Surprise of the Confederate Army at Vicksburg,” Publications of the Mississippi Historical Society, Vol. VIII, 53-4

 

 

Lee, William:

CS-Captain, Co E 4th Alabama Infantry; gefallen in der Schlacht von Malvern Hill 1.7.1862

 

 

Lee, William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney):

CS-MajGen; 1837-91; Sohn von Robert E. Lee und Mary Ann Randolph Custis; Lee führte JEB Stuart's dritte Kavallerie-Brigade, bestehend aus vier Regimentern aus Virginia und ein North Carolina Regiment; Cousin von Fitzhugh *Lee; typischer Südstaaten-Gentleman; Lee studierte in Harvard und wurde anschließend Offizier; 1859 schied er auf eigenen Wunsch aus der Armee aus und bewirtschaftete anschließend seine Län­dereien "White House" am Pamunkey River / VA bis Kriegsbeginn. Lee wurde Colonel der 9th Virginia Cavalry. Unter Stuart nahm die 9th Virginia Cavalry (vgl. Stuart's Report OR 12 [2] S. 120) an Skirmishes vom 21.7.-16.8.1862 im Raum zwischen Hanover Court House und Fredericksburg teil (vgl. Stuart's Report OR 12 [2] S. 119-121).

 

Im September 1862 war Lee Brigadekommandeur von Lee's Cavalry Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia , bestehend aus 5th, 4th, 3rd and 9th Virginia Cavalry (vgl. Priest: Before Antietam. Battle of South Mountain, a.a.O., S. 1).

 

Rooney Lee was not a brilliant strategist. Still, as a colonel of the 9th Virginia Cavalry he had won Stuart's praise for tactical aptitude. Late in 1862, after participating the Chickahominy Raid and taking a wound at Antietam, he had been named a brigadier, an honor ju­stified by later service at Fredericksburg and during Hampton's and Stuart's expedition at the close of the year (vgl. Longacre: The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 29).

 

Lee heiratete die schöne Tabb Bolling, die Tochter von Robert Bolling aus Bollingbrook im Fauquier County, Va. nahe Piedmont Sta­tion an der Manassas Gap Railroad (vgl. Swank: Courier, a.a.O., S. 17).

 

Photo:

William Henry Fitzhugh (Rooney) Lee (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Fitzhugh_Lee)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Longacre: The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O.

- Morrison, James L. jr. (ed.): The Memory of Henry Heth (Westport, Conn., 1974)

- Warner, Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 184

 

 

Lee, William O.:

US-Sgt; 7th Michigan Cavalry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lee, William O. (Sgt, 7th Michigan Cavalry): Personal and Historical Sketches and Facial History of and by Members of the Se­venth Regiment Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, 1862-1865 (Detroit Book Press; Reprint of 1902); 313pp, Illustrations, Index, Photos, Rosters. Personal descriptions of battle and service with the 7th Michigan by 60 of the surviving members of Custer's Cavalry Briga­de

 

 

Lee, William Raymond:

US-BrigGen; c. 1804-1891 (vgl. Boatner: Civil War Dictionary, a.a..O., S. 478); Civil Engineer und Railway Superintendent; West Point Kadett in der Klasse von 1829, hatte jedoch nicht graduiert, auf­grund des Todes seines Vaters 14 Tage vor Abschluß der Ausbil­dung; Col 20th Massachusetts Infantry (Farwell, Bull's Bluff, a.a.O., S. 43, 49).

 

Captured at Ball's Bluff 21.10.1861. Selected with Paul Joseph Reverr as hostage for the CSA privateers (Enchantress Affair). Sever­ly wounded at Nelson's Farm when his horse fell on him (vgl. Boatner: Civil War Dictionary, a.a..O., S. 478).

 

Lee erlitt schwere psychiatrische Verletzungen im Battle of Antietam und war schwer traumatisiert. „... rode away from his regiment the morning after Antietam without telling anyone and was later found, according to one of his subordinates, „without a cent in his pocket, without anything to eat or drink, without having changed his clothes for 4 weeks, during all which time he had this horrible diarrhea … He was just like a child wandering away from home“ (vgl. Henry L. Abbott to his father, letter from 20.11.1862; in Fallen Leaves: The Civil War Letters of Major Henry Livermore Abbott, ed. Robert Garth Scott [Kent, Ohio, 1992], S. 143; zitiert bei Mc­Pherson: Crossroads to Freedom. Antietam, a.a.O., S. 6).

 

BrigGen USA (Antietam, war service, am 13.3.1865); commanded 3. 2 II (Potomac); resigned 17.12.1862 (vgl. Boatner: Civil War Dictionary, a.a..O., S. 478)

 

 

Leech, William Albert:

US-BrigGen; aus Pennsylvania, *? - 1870; Ex-cadet West Point 1854, 25.4.1861 Maj 17th Pennsylvania Infantry, ausgeschieden nach Ablauf der 3monatigen Verpflichtungszeit; 10.3.1862 LtCol 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. Bvt. BrigGen (Boatner, S. 478); Leech kom­mandierte im Frühling 1862 als LtCol Pennsylvania-Truppen bei Belle Plaine / nahe Aquia Creek (Zeugenaussage Maj. Tillson wäh­rend des McDowell Court of Inquiry [vgl. OR Ser. I Vol 12/1 S. 80]).

 

 

Lefferts, Marshall C.:

US-Col; 1821-76; Col der 7th New York Infantry (vgl. Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 276 Anm. 40).

 

 

Leftwich, William W.:

CS-Captain; Co F, 4th Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 26); gefallen in Battle of Gettysburg klären

 

 

Le Gendre, C. W.:

US-Col, während Grant's Vicksburg Campaign 1863 war Le Gendre Col 51st New York Infantry (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. III, S. 1145).

 

 

Leggett, Mortimer D.:

US-BrigGen; Col 78th Ohio Infantry seit 18.12.1861; sein Regiment gehörte im Herbst 1862 zu McPherson's Left Wing, Grant's XIII. Corps (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 37). Leggett unternahm während Grant's Vorstoß nach Mississippi (vgl. Karte bei Davis, Nr. 154), auf Befehl von MajGen James B. McPherson, am 5. November 1862 eine Aufklärung von Grand Junction in nordwestlicher Richtung nach *Somerville, Tennessee mit der 30th Illinois Infantry und der 78th Ohio Infantry, Co. L 2nd Illinois Light Artillery und Teilen der 2nd Illinois Cavalry und der 7th Illinois Cavalry (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 37). Briga­dekommandeur in McPherson's Army Corps, Grant's Army of the Tennessee; am 10.12.1862 während des Grant's Overland Cam­paign bildete Legget's Brigade einen Brückenkopf über des *Yocona südlich von Oxford (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., I 275).

 

Legget besichtigt das 124th Illinois Infantry Regiment am 19.12.1863 (vgl. Snedeker Diary v. 19.12.1863);

 

 

Lehmann, Adolph:

US-Pvt; Co. I, 68th Regiment New York infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 82).

 

 

Lehmann, Albert:

US-Pvt; Co. K&E, 28th Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 23).

 

 

Lehmann, August:

CS-Pvt; Co. K, 3rd Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, Charles:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 19th Regiment Mississippi Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M232 Roll 23).

 

 

Lehmann, E.:

CS-Pvt; Co. E, 22nd Consolidated Regiment, Louisiana Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17); zuvor Co. E, 22nd Regiment Louisiana Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, Ernst:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21), s. auch Timmon's Texas Infantry

 

 

Lehmann, Frederick:

US-Commissary Sergeant; Co. F&S, 4th Regiment Illinois Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52); s. also 12th Illinois Cavalry

 

 

Lehmann, G.:

s. Julius Lehmann

 

 

Lehmann, G.:

CS-Pvt; Co. E, 4th Regiment, European Brigade, Louisiana Militia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, Gustav:

CS-Musician; Co. B, 4th Battalion, Texas Artillery (Shea's) Vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, H:

CS-Pvt (?); Co. A, 4th Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers 227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, H.:

CS-Pvt; 5th Field Battery Texas Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, Hermann August (D):

CS-Pvt (?); Co. A (Nathusius), Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n4), bzw. Co. C, Waul's Legion (vgl. Grabstein-Inschrift bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016).

 

Lehmann wurde im August 1862 discharged wegen Krankheit, but was conscripted again toward the end of the war (vgl. Kamphoef­ner/ Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 468 n32).

 

14.9.1834 Havelberg/Brandenburg/Germany (Geburtsort err. aus den Angaben zu Louis *Lehmann bei Kamphoefner/Helbich: Ger­man in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 448) - † 27.7.1866; beerd. Ludwig Lehmann Family Cemetery, Brenham, Washington County/Texas; S. v. Ludwig Lehmann (23.11.1794 Wien - † 28.2.1855 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Bren­ham, Washington County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) und Caroline Zeye Lehmann (1801 See­hausen/A. - † 27.4.1853 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Brenham, Washington County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016).

 

Hermann Lehmann wanderte 1849 mit seinen Eltern und drei Brüdern (Louis Carl *Lehmann, Julius Albert *Lehmann und Gustav Adolph Lehmann) 1849 nach Brenham/Texas aus: Der ältere Bruder Louis Lehmann übernahm die elterliche Farm und zahlte 1860 seine Brüder aus und führte die gutgehende Farm mit Baumwollanbau fort (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 449).

 

 

Lehmann, Hermd:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 4th Regiment, European Brigade, Louisiana Militia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, J.:

CS-Pvt; 5th Field Battery Texas Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, Jacob:

CS-Pvt; Co. B, 22nd Regiment Louisiana Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, James:

s. Joseph Lehmann

 

 

Lehmann, Johann:

CS-Pvt; Co. K, 3rd Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, John R.:

CS-(?); Co. I, 12th Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M3825 Roll 33).

 

 

Lehmann, Joseph:

CS-Pvt; Co. E, 4th Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21) auch als James Lehmann bezeichnet

 

 

Lehmann, Julius Albert (D):

CS-Pvt; Co. B, Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21), bzw. Co. A (Nathusius), Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n4); Bruder von Hermann Lehmann (Co. A (Nathusius), Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n4) und von Louis *Lehmann (Co. D, 37th Regiment Texas Cavalry [Terrell's]) (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n4).

 

26.9.1831 Havelberg/Brandenburg/Germany (Geburtsort err. aus den Angaben zu Louis *Lehmann bei Kamphoefner/Helbich: Ger­man in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 448 und Angaben auf dem Grabkreuz seines Bruders Gustav Adolph Lehmann, geb. 7.9.1827 Havel­berg [vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) - † 29.9.1895; beerd. Ludwig Lehmann Family Cemetery, Brenham, Wa­shington County/Texas; S. v. Ludwig Lehmann (23.11.1794 Wien - † 28.2.1855 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Bren­ham, Washing­ton County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) und Caroline Zeye Lehmann (1801 See­hausen/A. - † 27.4.1853 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Brenham, Washington County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016).

 

°° I mit Wilhelmine Rosenberg Lehmann (1834-1861); °° II Charlotte Klatt Lehmann (1834-1918) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016).

 

Julius Lehmann wanderte mit seinen Eltern und drei Brüdern (Louis *Lehmann, Hermann August *Lehmann und Louis Carl *Lehmann) 1849 nach Brenham/Texas aus: Der ältere Bruder Louis Lehmann übernahm die elterliche Farm und zahlte 1860 seine Brüder aus und führte die gutgehende Farm mit Baumwollanbau fort (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 449).

 

 

Lehmann, L.:

CS-Pvt (?); Co. C, 1st Regiment, French Brigade, Louisiana Militia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, L.:

CS-Pvt(?); Co. No. 5, 3rd Regiment, European Brigade, Louisiana Militia (Garde Francaise) (vgl. National Park soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, Lewis:

CS-Pvt; Co. (?), 35th Regiment Texas Cavalry (Brown's) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21)

 

 

Lehmann, Lewis:

US-Pvt; Co. B, 2nd Regiment Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 69).

 

 

Lehmann, Louis (Karl Ludwig) (D):

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 37th Regiment Texas Cavalry (Terrell's); Co. D wurde später transferred in 35th Texas Cavalry (Liken's) (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 452 n8). Zu seiner Verpflichtung in der CS-Army schreibt Lehm an in seinem zusammenfassenden Bericht vom Januar 1866 an seinen Schwager Friedrich Clausmeier, Gefängnisaufseher in Gefängnis Lüneburg: „Dearest brother-in-law, […) much as I hated to, I had to join the army and fight for a cause I never approved of […] (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 473).

 

Zunächst First Sergeant in einer militia brigade; vereidigt am 1.1.1863 für eine Dienstzeit von 3 months (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n5; vgl. Texas Confederate Records, Reel 3, Texas State A).

 

Im Battle of Masura/Louisiana (Red River Campaign) am 15.5.1864 geriet Pvt Lehmann von der „35th Regt Tex Cav.“ bei Marksville in Kriegsgefangenschaft und wurde in einem Gefange­nenlager in New Orleans inhaftiert (vgl. Brief Lehmann an „Beloved Friederieke'“ vom 15.6.1864, abgedruckt bei Kamphoefner/Hel­bich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 469-470). Ludwig Lehmann's entry in the Roll of Prisoners of War of the Union Army gives the wrong date of Capture (18.4.1864) but the correct date of his exchange (22.7.1864) (vgl. Lehmann's Roll of Prisoner, National Archives, Washington/DC, abgedruckt bei Kamphoefner/ Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 470 mit Hinweis auf das feh­lerhafte Datum).

 

25.12.1824 Havelberg/Brandenburg (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 449) - † 23.4.1904; beerd. Ludwig Lehmann Family Cemetery, Brenham, Washington County/Texas (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016); S. v. Ludwig Lehmann (23.11.1794 Wien - † 28.2.1855 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Bren­ham, Washing­ton County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) und Caroline Zeye Lehmann (1801 See­hausen/A. - † 27.4.1853 Brenham/Texas [Angaben lt. Grabkreuz auf dem Lehmann Cemetery, Brenham, Washington County/Texas, s. Photo bei www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016]) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 9.6.2016).

 

Karl Ludwig Lehmann geb. 25.12.1824 Havelberg/Brandenburg; wanderte mit seinen Eltern und seinen 3 jüngeren Brüdern 1849 nach Brenham/Texas aus; Farmer; °° 1854 mit Friederike Clausmeier aus Westfalen/German, übernahm die elterliche Farm und zahlte 1860 seine Brüder aus und führte die gutgehende Farm mit Baumwollanbau fort (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 449); Bruder von Julius *Lehmann und Bruder von Hermann Lehmann (Co. A (Nathusius), Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 n4).

 

Photo:

- Kamphoefner/Helbich: German in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 450 (Louis Lehmann),. S. 451 (Friederike Lehmann geb. Clausmeier)

- www.findagrave.com: Louis Lehmann

 

 

Lehmann, M.:

CS-Pvt (?); Co. F, 4th Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, Moritz:

CS-Drummer; Co. D, Waul's Texas Legion (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21).

 

 

Lehmann, O. H.:

CS-Pvt; ; Co. A, 4th Regiment, European Brigade, Louisiana Militia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, R. E.:

CS-Junior First Lieutenant; Co. A, 22nd Regiment Louisiana Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M378 Roll 17).

 

 

Lehmann, Robert:

CS-Pvt; Co. F, 2nd Battalion Maryland Cavalry; auch als Robert Laman genannt (vgl. National Park Soldiers M379 Roll 2);

 

 

Leib, Col.:

+++-Col 1st Miss. Heavy Artillery (vgl. Snedeker, Diary, a.a.O., v. 28.12.1863)

 

 

Leib, Ambrose D.:

US-+++; 7th Regiment Illinois Infantry

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

Leib, Ambrose D.: History of the Seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry, from Its First Muster into the U.S. Service, April 25,1861,to Its Final Muster Out, July 9,1865.Springfield,Ill.: Illinois Journal Co., 1868.

 

 

Leigh, Benjamin Watkins, Jr.:

CS-Major; zunächst Captain, Co. A, 1st Battalion Virginia Infantry (Regulars) (Irish Battalion) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 33); 1863 Captain, 42ndVirginia Infantry (vgl. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill /NC, Southern Historical Collection at Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, Nr. 05515-z), zuletzt Major und AAG im Stab von Gen Ed. Johnston's (vgl.

 

Benjamin Watkins Leigh was born in 1831 in Richmond, Va. Leigh practiced law until he enlisted as a captain in the Confederate army on 21 May 1861, receiving a commission in the 1st Batallion, Virginia Infantry Regiment. By June 1863, he had been transfer­red to the 42nd Virginia Infantry Regiment and promoted to full major. Leigh died in the Battle of Gettysburg on 3 July 1863 (vgl. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill /NC, Southern Historical Collection at Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, Nr. 05515-z).

 

18.1.1831 - † gef. 3.7.1863 Gettysburg, Culp's Hill; S. of Senator Benjamin W. Leigh aus Virginia (vgl. findagrave.com., Stichwort Benjamin Watkins Leigh Jr., Abruf v. 2.4.2017).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Leigh, Benjamin Watkins Jr.: Travel Diary, April 1861; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill /NC, Southern Historical Collection at Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library, Nr. 05515-z (The collection consists of a highly detailed travel diary kept by Benjamin Watkins Leigh in April 1861 during a trip through the South, ta­ken with his brother a month before Leigh enlisted in the Confederate Army. The brothers began their trip in Virginia and proceeded through North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama, before returning to Virginia through Mississippi and Tennessee. The diary contains lengthy, often block-by-block descriptions of the buildings and landmarks in the cities and towns Leigh visited, inclu­ding Wilmington, N.C., Charleston, S.C., Savannah, Ga., Mobile, Ala., and New Orleans, La., among others. The diary details Leigh's travel route, opinions on traveling by steamboat and rail, and observations on landscape and climate, as well as descriptions of meetings with family, friends, and other associates, including Abraham Minis and James Louis Petigru, as well as several encoun­ters with slaves. Several entries mention local reaction to events in the Civil War, including the ratification of the Constitution of the Confederate States, the Battle of Fort Sumter, and the secession of Virginia from the Union

 

 

 

Leitch, James:

CS-Capt; 1861 Capt. Co. Buckingham Leitches der 21st Virginia Infantry (vgl. Worsham, John H.: "One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry, a.a.O., S. 22).

 

 

Leland, Charles E.:

US-Pvt; Co. B, 13th Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 24).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Leland, Charles E.: Letter, 3 March 1862, from Charles E. Leland (1844-1863), 13th Massachusetts Infantry, in Martinsburg, (West) Virginia, to his father Charles Messinger Leland (b. 1821). He writes about the march from Williamsport, Pennsylvania to Martinsburg, entering town, the firing by another Union regiment, and the resulting confusion. Leland also gives a description of Martinsburg (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 43099)

 

 

Lemon, Charles:

US-Captain, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Gibbon unternimmt auf Befehl von Rufus B. King (dessen Division im Juli 1861 in Fredericks­burg lag) eine bewaffnete Aufklärung nach *Orange Court House, Va., bestehend u.a. aus 3rd Indiana Cavalry unter Captain Lemon ab 25.7.1862 wegen der Gefahr einer Flankierung durch CS-Truppen unter Gen. Stonewall Jackson u.a. mit der 2nd Wisconsin (vgl. Gibbon: Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 41; King's Report OR 12 [2] S. 104-105; Gibbon's Report OR 12 [2] S. 105-106).

 

 

Lenker, Christian:

US-Sergeant; Co. K, 19th Regiment Ohio Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 13).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

Barton, Michael (ed.): „The Civil War Memoir of Sgt. Christian Lenker, 19th Ohio Volunteers.“ The Civil War Memoir of Sgt. Chris­tian Lenker, 19th Ohio Volunteers, was originally published as a series of 174 articles appearing from 1912 to 1915 in the Pottsville (PA) Evening Chronicle. The author—at that time a physician practicing in nearby Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania—had been invi­ted by the editor to describe his service fifty years earlier in an Ohio regiment fighting in the western theater. Composing his articles from field notes and letters, Dr. Lenker tells in great detail his regiment’s fighting at Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, Chattanoo­ga, Pickett’s Mill, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, and Nashville.

 

 

Lenthall, John:

US-Chef des Navy Bureaus of Construction; Chief Engineer Joseph G. *Totten wurde 1861 von Scott beauftragt, die Möglichkeiten der industriellen Schaffung einer Flußflotte auf dem Mississippi und seinen Nebenflüssen zu eruieren (vgl. Bearss: Hardluck Iron­clad, a.a.O., S. 13-14; OR VII, pt. I, S. 165). Auf Anordnung Totten's erstellte John Lenthall, Chef des Navy Bureaus of Construction, eine Studie über ein geeignetes Gunboat (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 14; Brief Lenthall's an Totten vom 1.6.1861 National Archives, Re­cord of the Office of Quartermaster General, Record Group Nr. 92). Lenthall schlug ergänzend vor, einen Entwurf durch Consult Na­val Constructor *Pook erstellen zu lassen (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 14).

 

 

Lentz, John:

US-Captain; 91st Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. Beardon: Humphreys Pennsylvania Division; in: Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 101).

 

 

Leon, Pierre:

US-Captain of the Forecastle, U.S. Navy; born: 1837, New Orleans, La. Accredited to: Pennsylvania. Medal of Honor; G.O. No.: 11, 3 April 1863. Citation: Serving on board the U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, Yazoo River Expedition, 23 to 27 December 1862. Proceeding under orders up the Yazoo River, the U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, with the object of capturing or destroying the enemy's transports, came upon the steamers John Walsh, R. J. Locklan, Golden Age and the Scotland sunk on a bar where they were ordered fired. Continuing up the river, she was fired on, but upon returning the fire, caused the enemy's retreat. Returning down the Yazoo, she destroyed and captured larger quantities of enemy equipment and several prisoners. Serving bravely throughout this action, Leon, as captain of the forecastle, "distinguished himself in the various actions."

 

 

Leppien, George F.:

US-LtCol; 5th Battery Maine Light Artillery („E“) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 12); † deadly wounded at Chancellorsville, died 24.5. 1863 in Washington (vgl. Gettysburg Commission: Maine at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 83).

 

 

Lester, Austin W.:

US-Corporal; Chicago Board of Trade Battery, Illinois Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M 539 Roll 52).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lester, A. W.: Diaries, March 18, 1862 – August 1, 1865; 4 vols; Illinois State Historical Library, , Springfield / Illinois

 

 

Lester, Christian:

US-Corporal; Co. A, 124th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52); auch als Champlin Lester genannt

 

 

Lester, Daniel W.:

US-Corporal; Co.E, 117th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52).

 

 

Lester, Isaac I.:

US-Pvt; Co. D, 1st Regiment Illinois Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52).

 

 

Lester, John:

US-Pvt; Co. C, 23rd Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52).

 

 

Lester, John D.:

US-Pvt; Co. K, 96th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52).

 

 

Lester, Robert:

US-Pvt; Co. K, 2nd Regiment Illinois Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 52).

 

 

Letcher, John:

Gouverneur Virginias; April 27, 1861-+++; Gov. John Letcher ordered Col. Jackson to take command at Harper’s Ferry; bereits am 16.4.1861 hatte Wise ohne Wissen des amtierenden Gouverneurs Letcher auf einem Geheimtreffen mit Milizoffizieren den Angriff auf Harpers Ferry und Norfolk vereinbart. Virginia-Gouverneur John *Letcher war der erste, der Truppen für die irreguläre Kriegs­führung aufstellte. Durch einen Beschluß der Virginia General Assembly wurde er autorisiert, 10 Kompanien von Partisan Rangers aufzustellen (vgl. Haggman, Bertil: Confederate Irregular Warfare 1861-1865. Partizan Rangers Units and Guerilla Commands)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Boney, F. N.: John Letcher of Virginia (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1966)

- Confederate Veteran Vol. I April 1893, S. 103: "Harpers Ferry in 1861. First Events of the War in Virginia and Maryland"

 

 

Letterman, Jonathan Dr.:

US-Arzt; Medical Director der Army of the Potomac

 

Born at Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, December 11, 1824, he graduated from Jefferson College in 1845 and from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 1849. In June of that year, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon in the Army Medical Department. He served in Florida in campaigns against the Seminole Indians until 1853, and after a year at Fort Riley, Minnesota, he was ordered to Fort De­fiance, New Mexico Territory, where he saw action against the Apaches. In 1859 he was transferred to Fort Monroe, Virginia, and in 1860-61 was engaged in the Ute Campaign in California.

 

Late in 1861, he returned East and was assigned to duty with the Army of the Potomac. Named Medical Director of the Department of West Virginia in May 1862, was the next month appointed Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac with the rank of Major (Surgeon). In that post he completely reorganized the Medical Service, devising a system of forward first aid stations at the regimen­tal level, mobile field hospitals behind divisions and base hospitals, all linked by a proficient ambulance corps under the control of medical staff rather than the Quartermaster Department, and arranging an efficient system of medical supply.

At the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, in which the Army of the Potomac suffered 12,000 casualties, he proved the ef­ficiency of his methods. His system was subsequently adoped by other Union Armies in the field and was established officially by an Act of Congress in March 1864.

After a period as Inspector of Hospitals in the Department of the Susquehannah, he resigned from the Army in December 1864 and moved to San Francisco. His "Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac" appeared in 1866.

He died in San Francisco on March 15, 1872. On November 13, 1911 the Army Hospital at the Presidio was named Letterman Gene­ral Hospital in honor of the man who had revolutionized the care of battle casualties.

His private memorial in Section 3 of Arlington National Cemetery reads:

"Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac, June 23, 1862 to December 30, 1863, who brought order and efficiency into the Medical Service and who was the originator of modern methods of medical organization in armies." (vgl. http://www.arlington-ceme­tery. net/lettermn.htm).

 

Photo:

- Dr. Jonathan Letterman (vgl. US Army Medical Museum; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Letterman)

- Milhollen / Kaplan: Divided We Fought, a.a.O., S. 134

 

 

Leuschner, Charles A.:

CS-Sergeant; Co. B, 6th Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 21). Leuschner was a German Immigrant who fought with the 6th Texas. His diary details some of the fiercest military action of the Civil War.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Leuschner, Charles A. (6th Texas): The Civil War Diary of Charles A. Leuschner, Sixth Texas Infantry (Eakin Press), 128 pp, Notes, Maps, Roster. Edited by Charles Spurlin

 

 

Levan, Charles D.:

US-First Sergeant; Co. G, 178th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (v gl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 70).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Levan, Charles D.: Letter, 11 May 1863, from Charles D. Levan at Camp Columbia to Charles Wagner in Washingtonville, Penn­sylvania. Levan writes of the lack of sickness in his company, the reward issued for the capture of bushwhackers and of General Hooker crossing the Rappahannock River (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 43819)

 

 

Leventhorpe, Collett:

CS-BrigGen; 1.5.1815 Exmouth, Devon/England - † 1.12.1889 Wilkes County/NC (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collett_ Leventhor­pe); formerly a captain in the 18th Regiment of Foot. Born in Devon, Leventhorpe served ten years in the British military, seeing ser­vice in Ireland, Canada, and the West Indies, before selling his captaincy and taking a job in South Carolina for an English business firm. While on holiday in Asheville in 1843, he met his future wife, a native of Rutherford County. Settling in Rutherford County, Le­venthorpe volunteered for the Confederacy at war's start and achieved an appointment as colonel of the 34th North Carolina Infantry in October 1861 (http://www.nccivilwar150.com/features/foreigners/foreigners.htm). 

 

Col 11th North Carolina Infantry (der ehemaligen 1st North Caroli­na, dem "Bethel Regiment"); Leventhorpe war zunächst briti­scher Offizier seit 1832, verließ um 1850 auf eigenen Wunsch die briti­sche Armee, ließ sich in North Carolina nieder, wo er heiratete (vgl. Wilson: James Johnston Pettigrew, a.a.O., S. 41). Aus finanziel­len Gründen vor der Heirat Besuch des Medical College in Charle­ston, dann Arzt in Rutherfordton; Oktober 1861 Col. 34th North Carolina Infantry, im April 1862 zum Col. 11th North Caroli­na In­fantry gewählt; mit Pettigrew's Brigade Teilnahme am Battle of New Bern im Dezember 1862; Battles of Washington und Blount's Creek im Frühjahr 1863. Im Sommer 1863 gehörte Leventhorpe's 11th North Carolina Infantry zu Pettigrew’s Brigade Divi­sion Heth, Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Am 1.7.1863 im Battle of Get­tysburg am Willoughby Run Gefecht mit der 19th Indiana Infantry / Iron Brigade (vgl. Venner: 19th Indiana, a.a.O., S. 72 ff mit Kar­te S. 73). Im Battle of Gettysburg schwer verwundet und auf dem Rückzug am 11.7.1863 gefangen genommen (vgl. Wilson: Petti­grew, a.a.O., S. 74); ausgetauscht nach 9monatiger Gefan­genschaft im März 1864; trat er von seiner Confederate Commission zu­rück; zum BrigGen der North Carolina State Troops ernannt und einge­setzt bei der Verteidigung von Wilmington und Weldon Railroad Line; im Februar 1865 zum CS-BrigGen ernannt und vom CS-Senat be­stätigt, verzichtet er auf die Beförderung und blieb bei seinen State Troops bis zur Übergabe von General Joseph Johnston im Mai 1865; in der Nachkriegszeit lebte er zunächst in New York City und England, und kehrte erst 1879 nach North Carolina zurück; dort gestorben 1889 (vgl. Wilson: Pettigrew, a.a.O., S. 42-43).

 

Photo:

Collett Leventhorpe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collett_Leventhorpe)

 

 

Levy, Cheme M.:

US-Captain, aus New York; Assistant Quartermaster; Levy wurde angeklagt, eine gefälschte Urkunde unterzeichnet zu haben, betref­fend die Auszahlung von Sold an Soldaten seines Kommandos; Levy wurde deshalb am 9.10.1863 festgenommen (vgl. Basler: Col­lected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 1-2: Brief Lincoln's an US-Senator Samuel C. *Pomeroy vom 8.11.1863).

 

 

Levy, William M.:

CS-Col; 1862 Regimentskommandeur 2nd Louisiana Infantry; eingesetzt während McClellan's Peninsular Campaign im April 1862 am *Warwick River bei Dam Nr. 1 nahe Lee's Mill (vgl. Confederate Military History, a.a.O., vol. X, S. 211). Hier erfolgte am 16.4.1862 ein Angriff durch ein Vermont Regiment, der von Col Levy's 2nd Louisiana Infantry zurückgeschlagen wurde (vgl. Report of Col Levy, OR 11.1 S. 420-421).

 

 

Lewis, Abner McC.:

CS-Major; Co. F&S, 2nd Regiment Georgia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M226 Roll 36). Im Battle of Antietam am 17.9.1862 beteiligt an der Bergung der Leiche von LtCol William R. *Holmes; hierbei wurde der damalige Captain Lewis (Co. B) verwundet durch den 2. Volley (Salve) der 51st New York Infantry an der Lower Bridge (Burnside Bridge) verwundet (vgl. Priest: Antietam, a.a.O., S. 239; vgl. „The Burk SS“, in: Confe­derate Veteran XXXII, 1924, p. 464 ).

 

 

Lewis, Barbour:

US-Captain; 1st Missouri Cavalry; am 7.3.1862 war Lewis eingesetzt als Teil der Truppen von Provost Marshall Major Eli Weston zum Schutz des rückwärtigen Raums der Army of the Southwest. Lewis erkannte die CS-Umgehung nördlich von Big Mountain in den Rücken der US-Army bei Elkhorn Tavern (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 89).

 

 

Lewis, Brackin:

US-Captain, Co B 1st Arkansas Cavalry (US)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lewis, Brackin: Letter, 1884; 1 item. Letter, post-marked Carter's Store (Washington County), from former Captain Brackin Lewis, Company B, First Arkansas Cavalry (Union), to William W. Dudley, U. S. Commissioner of Pensions, regarding Lewis's claim based on his wartime illnesses (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Lewis, John F.:

US-Corporal; Co. D, 17th Regiment Connecticut Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M535 Roll 9).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

Lewis, John F.: Letter, 14 May 1863, from John F. Lewis (ca. 1836-1864), Company D, 17th Connecticut Infantry, to his wife Augusta H. Lewis (b. ca. 1839) of Plymouth Hollow, Connecticut, describing the battle of Chancellorsville, including the rout of the 11th Corps to which his regiment belonged by the Confederate Army. Lewis notes that his regiment was part of the only division which fought and retreated only after faced with overwhelming numbers and he sends a newspaper clipping confirming this. He details the fighting which halted the Confederate advance, mentions the wounded and dead, and relates how his lieutenant killed a Confederate sharpshooter. Lewis notes that many soldiers are missing and that many officers are resigning and comments on the marching the army has done since the battle (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 42193).

 

 

Lewis, John W.:

CS-Captain; 1863 Batteriechef der Lewis (Virginia) Artillery; im July 1863 gehörte die Lewis Artillery unter Captain John W. Lewis zur Divisionsartillerie der 2nd Division MajGen Henry Heth III Army Korps LtGen Ambrose A. Hill Lee's Army of Northern Virgi­nia, unter Col John J. *Garnett (*Garnett’s Artillery) (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 463; Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 60)

 

 

Lewis, Robert Eston:

CS-Pvt; Co. C, 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 34).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lewis, Robert Eston: Letters, 1862, from Robert Eston Lewis (1825-1876) of Company C, 1st Virginia Artillery Regiment at Lee’s Mill, York County, Virginia, to his wife Maryetta (Marietta) Louisiana Martin Lewis consisting of a letter, 15 April 1862, describing the skirmishing taking place along the front lines and containing an optimistic view of his service; and a letter, 1 May 1862, again containing news of the fighting along a line from Yorktown, Virginia, to Lee’s Mill and expressing Lewis’ unhappiness and his hopes of somehow getting out of his service, adding a threat that he might desert. Lewis adds that he believes the Union army will never be able to take Richmond, Virginia. There is a typed transcript of the 15 April 1862 letter (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Manuscript 30717).

 

 

Lewis, Samuel L.:

CS-Major/Quartermaster; General and Staff Officers, Non-Regimental Enlisted Men, CSA (vgl. National Park Soldiers M818 Roll 14).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lewis, Samuel L.: Receipt for troop pay, 27 October 1861, from Captain Samuel L. Lewis, quartermaster, 3th Brigade, CSA, for $90,000 to Samuel P. Mitchell, Chief Quartermaster, 2nd division, 1st Corps, CSA, Centreville, for pay for the troops of his brigade. Also includes a note on the provenance of the receipt (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 20149)

 

 

Lewis, William D., Jr:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 110th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 70).

 

Im Frühjahr 1862 gehörte die 110th Pennsylvania Infantry zur 3rd Brigade Tyler, Division BrigGen James *Shields 5th Army Corps Banks und war im Rahmen des V. Army Korps Banks im Shenandoah Valley eingesetzt; (vgl. OR 12 [I]: 346); Teilnahme am Battle von *Kernstown am 23.3.1862; beim Angriff auf dem rechten US-Flügel gegen *Fulker­son’s Brigade und *Carpenter’s Battery bei Sandy Ridge gegen den Stonewall, brach die 110th Pennsylvania Infantry zusammen und flüchtete (vgl. Copeland’s Report OR 12 (I), 847; Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 131; Henderson: Stonewall Jackson, a.a.O., S. 184; Col Lewis’ Report OR 12 [I] 377).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Lewis, William D.: Papers, March and April 1862, of William D. Lewis, a colonel in the 110th Pennsylvania Infantry who served as post commander during the Union occupation of Winchester, Virginia, from March to mid-April 1862. Consists of documents sub­mitted to Lewis including military correspondence, orders, receipts, reports, a furlough application, and a list of Union men from Winchester, Virginia. Correspondence and reports concern drunkenness and disorder among troops, spies including Joseph R. Jones, Garter Richards, and Hugh McGuire, battles near Winchester, military assistance requests, prisoners, and sick soldiers. Notable correspondents include Ann E. McGuire, General James Shields (1810-1879), Francis Salter, and H. G. Armstrong (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 41048 Miscellaneous reel 209. 1 reel. Microfilm. )

 

 

Leyden, Maurice:

US-Captain; Co. B&C, 3rd Regiment New York Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 83).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Leyden, Maurice: Letter, 27 May 1864, from Lieutenant Maurice Leyden (1836-1906) of Company C, 3rd New York Cavalry, near Petersburg, Virginia, to Margaret "Maggie" L. Garriguz (Garriguez) (1841-1928) of Rochester, New York. Leyden notes that General Benjamin Butler (1818-1893) has ordered his cavalry into the trenches, states that there is fighting with the Confederate army occur­ring nearby, and adds that he loves and misses her (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Archives and Manuscripts Room, Accession 51632)

 

 

Aktuelles

Homepage online

Auf meiner  Internetseite stelle ich mich und meine Hobbys vor.

 

 

Besucher seit 1.1.2014