Version 6.4.2017

 

Litera G

 

Gaffney, John C.:

US-Lt; Co. F&G, 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry; er trat als Corporal on das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 15).

 

 

Gage, Charles P.:

CS-Captain; 1862 im Battle if Shiloh Batteriechef Alabama Battery; die Battery gehörte 1862 zur 2nd Brigade BrigGen James T. Chalmers 2nd Division BrigGen Jones M. Withers II. Army Corps MajGen Braxton Bragg in A. S. Johnston's Army of the Mississip­pi; die Battery war am 6.4.1862 in Shiloh beim Angriff östlich der Eastern Corinth Road auf die US-Truppen bestehend 2nd Brigade Col Madison Miller 6th Division BrigGen Benjamin M. *Prentiss beteiligt (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 154 mit Karte S. 146).

 

 

Gaines, James J.:

CS-Captain; Batteriechef von Gaines's Arkansas Battery. Gaines‘s Battery umfaßte im Frühjahr 1862 zwei 12-pounder Guns und zwei 12-pounder Howitzers (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335). Im Frühjahr 1862 während der Pea Ridge Campaign gehör­te das Gaines‘s Arkansas Battery zu BrigGen James M. *McIntosh's Cavalry Brigade in Benjamin *McCulloch's Division, Van Dorn's Army of the West (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335).

 

 

Galbraight, Robert:

US-Col; 1st Tennessee Cavalry (US) (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 141).

 

 

Galbreath, F. W.:

US-Lt; Mitglied im Stab des XI Army Corps Oliver O. *Howard (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 51).

 

 

Gale, Dudley:

US-Pvt; Salisbury Point, Massachusetts; 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gale, Dudley: Letter, 1862, n.d. Union soldier in the 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry during the Civil War. Two letters, one written on December 5, 1862, from Gale in New Orleans, Louisiana, and the other on July 23, year unknown, from an unknown place. Both are to his mother in Salisbury Point, Massachusetts. Writes about a recent illness he suffered and a friend with whom he enlisted, who is now going home, and his happiness that a furlough home is pending. (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms 92-014).

 

 

Gale, William:

CS-Lt; Schwiegersohn von General Polk und Mitglied von dessen Stab (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 148).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gale / Polk: Papers (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

 

 

Gallagher, William B.:

CS-Lt; 1st Virginia Cavalry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gallagher, William B.: Papers, 1861. Private in Company E, First Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Papers consist of a document confir­ming Gallagher's promotion from private to lieutenant (August 1861), and letters written by Gallagher to his parents (May and July, 1861). One of the letters was written from Manassas, Virginia, two days before the Battle of First Bull Run, July 1861. Transcripts available. (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms 91-062).

 

 

Galligan, John:

US-LtCol, 4th Iowa Infantry

 

Während der Pea Ridge Campaign von Frühjahr 1862 war Regimentskommandeur LtCol John Galligan (verwundet in der Schlacht v. Pea Ridge); das Regiment gehörte zur 1st Brigade Col Grenville M. *Dodge in Col Eugene A. *Carr‘s 4th Division in Samuel R. *Curtis Army of the Southwest (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 333). Teilnahme am Battle of Pea Ridge.

 

 

Galligher, James A.:

US-Col; Co. A, 13th Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry; er trat als Captain in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M54 Roll 41).

 

Während der vom Col Schall befehligten US-Aufklärung vom 12.6.1863 südlich von Winchester/VA mit 5 Kompanien des 87th Re­giment Pennsylvania Infantry, a battalion of the 13rd Pennsylvania Cavalry und 2 guns of Battery L, Fifth US Artillery, mit einer Ge­samtstärke von 700 Mann (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 74), stieß die US-Aufklärung auf Captain Raisin's Co. E die zusammen mit einer Infantry Company on outpost duty bei Middleton/Shenandoah stand (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 75). Beide CS-Kompanien wurden in einen Hinterhalt gelockt; dabei wurde Raisin verwundet und geriet in Kriegsgefangenschaft (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 77; vgl. Valuska/Keller: Damn Dutch, a.a.O., S. 48; vgl. OR ser. I, vol. 27, pt. 2, S. 42, 53, 163).

 

 

Galwey, Thomas Francis:

US-1st Lt; Co. B, 8th Regiment Ohio Infantry; Galwey trat als Sergeant in das Regiment ein, nachdem er bereits Sergeant in Co. B, 8th Regiment Ohio Infantry (3 months) gewesen war (vgl. National Park Soldiers M552 Roll 17; Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 27).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Galwey, Francis Thomas: The Valiant Hours: The Narrative of „Captain Brevet“, An Irish-American in the Army of the Potomac (Harrisburg 1961)

 

 

Gamble, Hamilton R.:

US-Politiker aus Missouri; Vertreter der moderaten Unionskräfte in Missouri. Gamble stellte sich gegen die Ernennung von Natha­niel *Lyon zum Befehlshaber in Missouri, da er dessen Vorgehen gegen *Camp Jackson und den hierdurch ausgelösten Aufruhr in Missour­i mißbilligte (vgl. Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 72, 77). Gamble unterstützte Gen. Harney in Washington, wo es ihm ge­lang, General Attorney Edward Bates für eine Belassung von General Harney als Befehlshaber der US-Truppen in Missouri zu gewinnen (vgl. Brooksher, a.a.O., S. 71); Gable blieb auch immer Sommer 1861 zusammen mit Bates und Gen Scott hartnäckig bei seiner ab­lehnenden Haltung gegenüber Lyon und dessen Beförderung zum Kommandierenden General im Westen (vgl. Brooksher, a.a.O., S. 127; Kemp, Col. Hardy A.: About Nathaniel Lyon, Brigadier General, United States Army Volunteers, and Wilson's Creek [published by the Author, 1978], S. 100).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 70-71, 77, 127, 158

 

 

Gambee, Charles B.:

US-Col, Co. A, 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry [Anm.: bei National Park Soldiers nicht genannt; Gambee war zunächst Captain Co. A des Regiments, dann Col 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry; † 15.5.1864 gef. Im Battle of Resaca (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 21).

 

Photo:

Col Charles B. Gambee (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 20)

 

 

Gamble, William L.:

US-BrigGen; 1.1.1818 Farmanagh/Ireland - † 20.12.1866 bei Virgin's Hill/ Nicaragua; °° Sophia Friederica Steingrandt (31.1.1821 Hanover/Germany - † 1867; Tochter von Georg H. Steingrandt; mit ihren Eltern 1838 emigriert in die USA).

 

William L. Gamble was born January 1, 1818, in county Farmanagh, Ireland, and was the oldest of four brothers, the others being Ja­mes, David and Osborne, who all died in Chicago, where they made their home. The paternal grandfather of our subject, who also bore the name of William, was a native of Ireland, and at an early day came with his family to the United States. In his native land General Gamble was educated as a civil engineer, and was in the queen's service before his emigration to the new world. Gamble had been employed in the Queen's Surveying Service of the Royal Engineers, and done a short hitch as a dragoon in the British Army. In 1839, when twenty-one years of age, he crossed the Atlantic, and for five years after his arrival served in the regular army as a mem­ber of the First New York Dragoons, stationed at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. On leaving the army he located in Chicago, being in the go­vernment service at old Fort Dearborn until his removal to Evanston in 1859. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the Union service and was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Eighth Illinois Cavalry, under Colonel Farnsworth. The regiment came into existence in this way: In August, 1861,General Farnsworth proceeded to Washington, District of Columbia, visited Presi­dent Lincoln and Secretary Cameron, and from the latter obtained an order to organize the Eighth Illinois Cavalry (vgl. http://www.g­oogle.de/ imgres?imgurl=http://genealogytrails.com; vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 17)

 

The service at that time was greatly in need of more cavalry, and General Farnsworth was, by his extensive acquaintance, great abili­ty and popularity well qualified for this work. He returned to St. Charles, Illinois, which he made his temporary headquarters, issued a call for twelve hundred men, and in two weeks the regiment was ready for duty. On the 18th of September, 1861, it was mustered into service and on October 14 started for Washington, arriving there two days later. With its twelve hundred stalwart men stepping to the tap of the drum and marching through the streets of Washington it created a great sensation. When Colonel Farnsworth was pro­moted, Mr. Gamble became its colonel. With the Army of the Potomac he participated in many important engagements, and at the battle of Malvern Hill was wounded in the side by a minie ball. After two months spent at home he was able to rejoin his command though the wound was a very serious one, breaking two ribs and the ball lodging in his shoulder blade. He was commissioned briga­dier-general September 25, 1865, his command being composed of the Eighth and Twelfth Illinois, the Twelfth New York, and also a part of an Indiana regiment and a part of a Pennsylvania regiment. With his command he took part in all of the important campaigns of the army of the Potomac until the surrender at Appomattox, serving with distinguished honor and bravery. He was one of the gene­rals on duty at President Lincoln's funeral. After the Eighth Illinois Cavalry was mustered out, he was on duty at Jefferson Barracks for about a year, being mustered out March 13, 1866, and July 28, 1866, he was mustered into the regular army as colonel of the Eighth United States Cavalry, which was ordered to California by way of the Isthmus. While waiting for transportation on the Isth­mus the cholera broke out, and Colonel Gamble, with many of his troops, died from that dread disease December 20, 1866, being bu­ried at Virgin's Hill, Nicaragua. He was a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and was a warm friend of President Lincoln. With the First Methodist Episcopal church of Evanston he held membership, and was a true Christian gentleman, as well as a loyal, patrio­tic and devoted citizen of his adopted country (vgl. http://www.google.de/ imgres?imgurl=http:// genealogytrails.com).

Während der Gettysburg Campaign war Gamble Brigadekommandeur 1st Cavalry Brigade in Buford's 1st Cavalry Division (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 39; Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 454; vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 17).

 

Gamble’s Brigade bestand aus folgenden Regimentern (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 454):

- 8th Illinois Cavalry Maj John L. Beveridge

- 12th Illinois Cavalry (4 Co’s) Col George H. Chapman

- 3rd Indiana Cavalry (6 Co’s) Col George H. Chapman

- 8th New York Cavalry LtCol William L. Markell

mit einer Stärke von 1600 Mann (vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 17).

 

Am 1.8.1863 gegen 8.00 hatten Gamble's Männer eine Verteidigungslinie am westlichen Ausläufer von McPherson's Ridge bezogen, die Vorposten standen westlich der Hauptlinie. Gamble's Vorposten führten das verzögernde Vorpostengefecht mit Archer's Brigade für die Dauer von zwei Stunden. Die Skirmishers von Gamble's Brigade wurden zunächst nach Herbst Wood und dann zu einer Baumlinie auf dem Westufer des Willoughby Run zurückgedrängt. Gegen 10.00 wurden die Vorposten auf die Hauptverteidigungsli­nie zurück gedrückt und Gamble war gezwungen, seine rechts Hauptverteidigungslinie teilweise zurückzuverlegen, seine linke Flan­ke mit der 8th New York Cavalry geriet zudem unter schweres Feuer von Archer's Truppen. Gegen 10.00 wurde Gamble's Brigade durch die Iron Brigade abgelöst (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 153-154 mit Karte S. 150). Am 1.7.1863 hatte Gamble 900 Mann auf Herr Ridge zusammengezogen, who fired into Archer's skirmish line as their own videttes (Feldwachen) retreated (vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 28). Nach einer Stunde gab Gamble, der von der Höhe aus das Vorgehen der CS-Brigade Ar­cher überblicken konnte, reluctantly the order to quit Herr Ridge, withdrawing toward Buford's main position along McPherson's Ridge. He left a screen of his own scirmishers in the tangeld foliage on the banks of Willoughby Run. Insgesamt hatte Gamble's Bri­gade eine Stärke von 1200 Mann with Lt. John H. Calef (Battery A, 2nd US Artillery) mit 6 guns (vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 29).

 

Photo:

Col William L. Gamble (aus http://genealogytrails.com/ill/kane/biopix/gengamble.jpg)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gamble, W. L.: Gamble Collection, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago / Ill.

- Gamble, William L.: Correspondence, Chicago Historical Society, Chicago / Ill.

 

 

Gammage, Washington L.:

CS-Surgeon, 4th Arkansas Infantry (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 85 mit Anm. 61).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gammage, Washington L.: The Camp, the Bivouac, and the Battle Field. Beeing a History of the Fourth Arkansas Regiment, From its First Organizations Down to the Present Day. Selma, Ala., 1864

 

 

Gantz, Jacob:

US-+++; 4th Iowa Cavalry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gantz, Jacob (4th Iowa Cavalry): Such are the Trials: The Civil War Diaries of Jacob Gantz (Iowa State Univ, 1991); 122 pp, Index, Biblio, Photos, Maps. This unit fought at Vicksburg and throughout Mississippi, as well as in Arkansas at Pea Ridge and other battles of the West

 

 

Garbar, Alexander M.:

CS-Captain; Assistent von Major John *Harman, dem Quartermaster im Stab Stonewall Jackson's während Jackson's Vorstoß gegen Bath und Romney vom Januar 1862 als Quartermaster der Army of the Valley (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 67).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Garbar, Alexander M.: Sketch of the Life and Services of Major John A. Harman (privately printed: Staunton, Va., 1876)

 

 

Garber, Asher W.:

CS-Captain, Garber's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Staunton Artillery); er trat als Lieutenant in die Company ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 21). Im Battle of Antietam am 17.9.1862 Garber, commanding one of Stuart's Batteries on Nicodemus Hill, would lay claim to firing the opening shot of the Battle (vgl. Sears: Landscape turned Red, a.a.O., S. 182 mit Karte S. 183).

 

 

Gardiner, Andrew J.:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 11th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8).

 

 

Gardiner, George W.:

US-Pvt; Co. A, 15th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner Harrison W.:

US-Pvt; Co. (?), 3rd Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. Frassanito: Antietam: Photographic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 78-79; Anm.: bei National Parl Soldiers nicht genannt).

 

Gardiner stammte aus Augusta/Maine; Gardiner wurde zum Signal Corps transferiert und war zusammen mit Lt. Edward C. *Pierce im Battle of Antietam am 17.9.1862 auf einer Signal Station close to the Front lines bei den North Woods eingesetzt. Im Battle of Gettysburg 1.-3.7.1863 diente Gardiner erneut zusammen mit Lt Edward C. *Pierce with distinction on Little Round Top (vgl. Frassanito: Antietam Photographic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 78-79).

 

Photo:

- Frassanito: Antietam Photographic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 76-78

 

 

Gardiner, Henry:

US-Pvt; Co. A, 15th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, Henry C.:

US-Pvt (Drummer); Co. C, 11th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8).

 

 

Gardiner, Isaac:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 6th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, Jacob W.:

US-Corporal; Co. C, 11th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8).

 

 

Gardiner, John H.:

US-Pvt (?); Co. F, 26th Regiment Maine Infantry (9 months, 1862-63) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); originally filed under John S. Gardner

 

 

Gardiner, Joseph H.:

US-Pvt; Co. D, 21st Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); auch als 'Joseph C. Gardiner' bezeichnet

 

 

Gardiner, Loring:

US-Pvt; Co. A, 15th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, Lovell L.:

US-Sergeant; Co. C, 11th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8).

 

 

Gardiner, Nathaniel:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 6th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, Willard D.:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 6th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, Willard E.:

US-Pvt; Co. F, 6th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardiner, William E.:

US-Pvt; Co. K, 15th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); original filed under 'Gardner'

 

 

Gardner, Alexander:

US-Photographer; Gardner was a student of Matthew Brady and broke away to start his own studio during the war. His photos were the basis for engravings in "Harper's Weekly" and are among the most memorable of the war (vgl. Frassanito: Antietam: Photographic Legacy, a.a.O., S. 54).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, a.a.O., vol. 1, S. 447, 454-55

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Cobb, Josephine: „Alexander Gardner,“ in: Image: Journal of Photography VII (June 1958), p. 124-136

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, a.a.O., vol. 1, S. 106, 264, 347, 411-12, 427, 435, 447, 448, 454-55, 536, 570, 603, 667, 684, 909, 910, 911, 913, 914, 918, 922, 928, 930, 931, 939, 945, 947, 949, 952, 953, 1280, 1282, 1321, 1334

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 47, 113, 117, 1154, 1167, 1182, 1270, 1279-81, 1290

- **Gardner, Alexander: Catalogue of Photographic Incidents of the War (Washington, D.C.: Polkinhorn, 1863)

- **Katz, D. Mark: Witness to an Era: The Life and Photographs of Alexander Gardner (Rutledge Hill); 320 pp

 

 

Gardner, Franklin:

CS-MajGen; als Nachfolger von W. N. R. Beall übernahm Gardner die Verteidigung von *Port Hudson / Mississippi am am 28.12.1862. Gardner legte ausgefeilte Artilleriestellungen und ausgedehnte Grabensysteme an und verwandelte Port Hudson zur Fes­tung. Es gelang ihm Stadt, Hafen und Festung bis nach dem Fall von Vicksburg erfolgreich gegen MajGen Nathaniel *Banks zu ver­teidigen (vgl. Davis [ed.], Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 16).

 

 

Gardner, J. A.:

CS-Pvt; 5th Alabama Infantry; am 17.7.1861 war die 5th Alabama unter Col Robert E. *Rodes eingesetzt bei Sangster's Station / VA und hatte den Befehl den US-Angriff Richtung Bull Run zu verzögern (vgl. Davis: Battle of Bull Run, a.a.O., S. 109).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gardner, Amanda: Papers, Duke University Library, Durham, North Carolina

 

 

Gardner, R. D.:

CS-LtCol, 1862 Col. 4th Virginia Infantry, Battle of Cedar Mountain (vgl. Battles and Leaders, Vol. II., a.a.O., S. 496)

 

 

Garey, Joseph:

CS-+++; Hudson's Battery, Mississippi Artillery

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Garey, Joseph: A Keystone Rebel: The Civil War Diary of Joseph Garey, Hudson's Battery, Mississippi Volunteers (Thomas Publi­cations); Edited by David A. Welker, 128 pp. Garey was raised in Pennsylvania but fought for the Confederacy as a members of Hud­son's Battery of Mississippi Artillery. A rare daily account of life in this unit in

the Western theater.

 

 

Garfield. James A.:

US-GenMaj; 19.11.1831-19.11.1881; James A. Garfield was twentieth president of the United States (von 4.1.1881-19.9.1881, ge­storben nach Attentatsversuch, bei dem er nicht schwer verletzt wurde, im Amt; s. Internet Datei Garfield Nr. 2: "How Alexander Graham Bell helped kill the President"). During the Civil War he served as colonel of the 42nd Ohio Infantry; Am 10.1.1862 atta­ckiert US-Oberst James A. Garfield attackiert den Kentuckier Humphrey Marshall am Middle Creek bei Prestonburg/KY (vgl. Guer­rant, Edward O.: Marshall and Garfield in Eastern Kentucky; in: B&L I, S. 393). (Der zukünftige US-Präs.) Garfield verliert 28, Mar­shall 42 Mann, wer Sieger ist, bleibt Auslegungssache. Weitere 4 000 Blauröcke setzen über den Ohio.

 

Kurz darauf erfolgte seine Promotion to brigadier general in January 1862. The following year he obtained the rank of major general; ab Frühling 1863 war BrigGen Garfield Chief of Staff of the Army of the Cumberland (MajGen. William S. Rosecrans) in Murfrees­boro / TN (vgl. Willet, The Lightning Mule Brigade - Abel Streight's 1863 Raid to Alabama, S. 11, 15), but resigned on December 5, 1863 when he was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. During his military career, Garfield participated in the battles of Shi­loh, Tennessee, and Middle Creek and Round Gap, Kentucky.

 

Photo:

Willett, a.a.O., S. 25

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Arkansas University, Fayetteville: Garfield Papers, 1839-1884; 177 rolls. Unterlagen, Papiere Papers, 1839-1884; 177 rolls; This extensive collection consists of diaries, correspondence, legal papers, financial re­cords, shorthand notebooks, speeches, articles, scrapbooks, and memorabilia covering Garfield's life and career. A printed index of correspondence is included. Microfilm copy of original documents held by the Library of Congress) (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

- Garfield, James A.: The Wild Life in the Army. East Lansing, Mich.: Michigan State University Press, 1964

- Guerrant, Edward O.: Marshall and Garfield in Eastern Kentucky; in: B&L vol. I, S. 393

- Smith, Theodore Clark: The Life and Letters of James A. Garfield (2 vols. New Haven, 1925)

 

 

Garibaldi, John:

CS-Pvt; 27th Virginia Infantry (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 89; Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 182) in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 90).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Garibaldi, John: Garibaldi Letters: Stonewall Jackson Memorial Association, Lexington Va.

- Garibaldi, John: Garibaldi Letters. Unpublished wartime letters of John Garibaldi, written in most part 1861 and 1863 (Virginia Mi­litary Institute Manuscript Collection; Lexington, Va.)

 

 

Garland, Robert R.:

CS-Col; Co. F&S, 6th Regiment Texas Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 13). unterschiedlich angegeben: als Robert R. Garland (vgl. National Park Soldiers M227 Roll 13) bzw. Robert S. Garland (vgl. National Park Soldiers Confederate Texas Troops)

 

 

Garland, Rufus K.:

CS-Captain, 4th Arkansas Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Pea Ridge am 7.3.1862, eingesetzt in Morgan's Woods (vgl. Shea / Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 117 mit Karte S. 108).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Garland, Rufus K.: Letter, Washington (Arkansas) Telegraph vom 2.4.1862

 

 

Garland, Samuel jr.:

CS-BrigGen; 1830-62; Virginia Military Institut, graduiert 1849; anschließend Studium der Rechte an der Virginia University; Rechtsanwalt in Lynchburg, dort graduiert 1851; nach dem Überfall John Brown's auf Harper's Ferry 1859, organisierte Garland die Lynchburg Home Guards; CS-Capt. 11th Virginia Infantry seit 24. April 1861; wenige Tage später zum Col. 11th Virginia gewählt. Blackburn's Ford (18.7.1861; vgl. Blackford, Letters of Lee's Army, a.a.O., S. 25), 1st Manassas und Drainesville. Verwundet bei Williamsburg. BrigGen CSA am 23.5.1862; Brigadekommandeur während der Peninsular Campaign. Während der 2nd Manassas Campaign stand Garland US-Gen McDowell bei Fredericksburg gegenüber. Gefallen im Battle von South Mountain oder Battle of Boonsboro am 14.9.1862 bei Fox's Gap (vgl. Karte bei Cannan, Antietam, a.a.O., S. 102).

 

Über die South Mountain führen zwei Hauptstraßen ins Pleasant Valley nach Sharpsburg bzw. Boonsboro, die nördlich gelegene Na­tional Road über Turner's Gap und im Süden die Straße über Crampton's Gap (vgl. Karte bei Sears, Landscape Turned Red, a.a.O., S. 127). Der Paß Turner's Gap, über den die National Road von Frederick City nach Sharpsburg führt, wies mehrere Seitenwege auf, über welche die CS-Verteidigungsstellungen auf der Paßhöhe bei Turner's Gap flankiert werden konnten. Eine Meile südlich von Tur­ner's Gap führte eine Nebenweg, die sog. 'Old National Road' über das Gebirge.

 

Die Division Daniel H. *Hill von Stonewall Jackson's Corps bildete beim Rückzug über die South Mountains während der Maryland Campaign vom September 1862 die CS-Nachhut. Vor Hill's Division befand sich im Osten nur noch Stuart's Cavalry, an dem Paß über die östlich gelegenen Catoctin Mountain bei Middletown (Karte bei Sears, a.a.O., S. 127), die von zwei US-Brigaden bedrängt wurde. Auf Bitten Stuart's um Unterstützung entsandte Hill am 13.9.1862 Brigade Garland und Colquitt. Am frühen Morgen des 14. September 1862 hatte Stuart zum südlichen der beiden Pässe durch die South Mountain, dem Paß von Crampton's Gap zurückgezo­gen, während die Brigade Garland auf der Paßhöhe des nördlichen Passes, Turner's Gap stand. Lediglich die Brigade Colquitt stand noch am Fuß der Berge östlich von South Mountain (vgl. Hill, a.a.O., S. 561). Gen Hill setzte um eine Umgehung von Turner's Gap über die eine Meile südlich vorbei führende 'Old National Road' zu verhindern, Garland's Brigade bei Fox's Gap ein (vgl. Sears, a.a.O., S. 129; Cox: "Forcing Fox's Gap", B & L II S. 586-587 und Abb. a.a.O., S. 572). Die US-Brigade *Scammon bestand aus 12th Ohio Infantry, 23rd Ohio Infantry und 30th Ohio Infantry (vgl. Cox: Forcing Fox's Gap, B & L II S. 585). Am 14.9.1862 griff Scam­mon im Battle of South Mountain bei Fox's Gap Garland's CS-Brigade an (vgl. Cox, a.a.O., S. 586-87). CS-Gen Hill setzte um eine Umgehung von Turner's Gap (South Mountain) über die eine Meile südlich vorbei führende 'Old National Road' zu verhindern, Gar­land's Brigade bei Fox's Gap ein (vgl. Sears, a.a.O., S. 129; Cox: "Forcing Fox's Gap", B & L II S. 586-587 und Abb. a.a.O., S. 572). em Vorpostengefecht mit Skirmishers der 23rd Ohio Infantry unter LtCol R. B. *Hayes gegen 9.oo (vgl. Hill, a.a.O., S. 563), dem sich ein Bajonett-Angriff auf die 12th North Carolina Infantry anschloß, die Stellung hinter einer Steinmauer (Abb. bei B & L II S. 572) genommen hatte. Garland's unerfahrene Brigade wurde geworfen. Samuel Garland, der neben Thomas Ruffin an der Linie der 13th North Carolina stand, wurde tödlich getroffen, Ruffin wurde verwundet (vgl. Brief Ruffin's an D. H. Hill, abgedruckt in Hill, Battle of South Mountain, B & L II, S. 563-64).

 

Photo:

- Warner: Generals in Gray, a.a.O., S. 98

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Hill, Daniel H.: "The Battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro" in: B & L vol. II, S. 559 ff

- Warner: Generals in Gray, a.a.O., S. 98-99

 

 

Garner, W. W.:

CS-2ndLt; Co E 8th Regiment Arkansas Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M376 Roll 8).

 

Garner participated in and wrote about the following actions: Marmaduke's raid into Missouri, April 21- May 2, 1863; battle of Hele­na (Phillips County), July 4, 1863; and battle of Fitzhugh's Woods, April 1, 1864

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- May Hope Moose. Papers, 1863-1980; contains typed transcripts of twenty-two letters written by Lieutenant W. W. Garner, Compa­ny E, Newton's Regiment of Arkansas Cavalry. The letters were all written from various points in Arkansas and southeast Missouri between April 15, 1863, and April 2, 1864, to Garner's wife, Henrietta, living in Quitman (Van Buren County). Garner participated in and wrote about the following actions: Marmaduke's raid into Missouri, April 21- May 2, 1863; battle of Helena (Phillips County), July 4, 1863; and battle of Fitzhugh's Woods, April 1, 1864 (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Garnett, John J.:

CS-LtCol; 1863 Kommandeur der Artillerie 2nd Division MajGen Henry Heth III Army Korps LtGen Ambrose A. Hill Lee's Army of Northern Virginia (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 463; Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 60); Garnett's Artillery umfaßte folgende Bat­terien (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 463).

- Donaldsonville (Louisiana) Artillery Captain V. Maurin

- Huger (Virginia) Artillery Captain Joseph D. Moore

- Lewis (Virginia) Artillery Captain John W. Lewis

- Norfolk Light Artillery Blues Captain C. R. Grandy

 

 

Garnett, Lieutenant:

CS-Lt; er kommandierte 1861 eine Section der Washington Artillery aus New Orleans im Skirmish von Blackburn's Ford am 18.7.1861; diese Teileinheit war der Brigade Longstreet unterstellt (vgl. Early: War Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 8).

 

 

Garnett, Richard Brooke:

CS-BrigGen; geboren ca 1817 (Angabe nach Boatner; nach Robertson: Stonewall Brigade, a.a.O., S. 54 dagegen 1819) in Essex County, Va. auf der Plantage seines Vaters; gefallen 1863; stammte aus bester Tidewater Aristocracy; Cousin von Robert S. *Garnett; West Point 1841 (29/52); Berufsoffizier; Seminole War; dann an der Frontier; Gen. Brooke's ADC in New Orleans im Mexikokrieg; Utah-Expedition; am 17. Mai 1861 als Captain der US-Army ausgeschieden, schloß sich Garnett der CSA als Major der Artillerie an; BrigGen 14. Nov. 1861 und Brigadekommandeur der *Stonewall Brigade als Nachfolger von Stonewall Jackson. Im Frühjahr 1862 gehörte Garnett's Brigade als 1st Brigade zu Stonewall Jackson's Army of the Shenandoah, bestehend aus

- 1st Brigade (BrigGen *Garnett):

- 2nd Virginia Infantry Col John Allen

- 4th Virginia Infantry LtCol Charles A. Ronald

- 5th Virginia Infantry Col William Harman

- 27th Virginia Infantry Col John Echols

- 33rd Virginia Infantry Col Arthur C. Cummings

 

Teilnahme am Battle of Kernstown am 23.3.1862. Garnett's gelang es bei Beginn der Schlacht zunächst nicht, seine Brigade zu­sammenzuhalten. Erst während des massierten US-Gegenangriff mit überlegenenen Kräften bei Sandy Ridge bildete die Brigade eine zu­sammenhängende Verteidigungslinie (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 130 ff). Stonewall Jackson stellte Garnett we­gen seines Rückzugs im Battle von Kernstown 1862 unter Arrest und ließ am 6./7. August 1862 ein Kriegsgerichtsverfahren gegen Gar­nett in Gen Ewell's Hauptquartier in Liberty Mills, westlich von Orange Court House direkt am Rapidan gelegen, durchführen (Karte bei Symonds, a.a.O., S. 38; Davis, a.a.O., Nr. 22.5; Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., 2;7-8; Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 18; Hotchkiss, Make Me a Map, a.a.O., S. 65), durchführen, das 7 Anklagepunkte betreffend das Battle of Kernstown enthielt; Kern der Vorwürfe war: obwohl Garnett's Brigade alle Munition verschossen hatte und ihre Gefangennahme bevorstand, hätte er nach Jackson Ansicht mit einem Bajonett-Angriff den US-Angriff abwehren sollen. Garnett warf Jackson dagegen im Trial vor, die­ser habe fehler­haft die Stärke der US-Truppen unterschätzt und hierdurch die Truppen in erhebliche Gefahr gebracht (vgl. Krick: Ce­dar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 14; Krick, Robert K.: "Army of Northern Virginia's Most Notorious Court Martial," Blue & Gray 3 (June-Ju­ly 1986), S. 27-32). Das Verfahren wurde wegen Jackson's Angriff gegen Pope am Abend des 7.8.1862 unterbrochen und nicht mehr aufgenommen (vgl. Krick, a.a.O., S. 15). Nach Jackson's Tod ließ Gen. Lee das Verfahren einstellen und rehabilierte Garnett (vgl. Confederate Ve­teran Vol. I Jan. 1893 S. 19; Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 14). In Gettysburg kommandierte Garnett eine Brigade; am 3.7.1863 ist er bei Gettysburg während Pickett's Charge gefallen.

 

Photo:

- Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., nach S. 236

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Confederate Veteran Vol. I Jan. 1893 S. 19

- Davis, Stephens: "The Death and Burials of General Richard Brooke Garnett"; Gettysburg Magazin Nr. 5

- Freeman, Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 7-11

- Garnett Papers, Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, Va.

- Garnett Court Martial Papers. Typed transcript of testimony and various supporting documents collected for court-martial of Briga­dier General Richard B. Garnett during August 1862 (Museum of the Confederacy, Richmond, Va.)

- Krick, Robert K.: "Army of Northern Virginia's Most Notorious Court Martial," Blue & Gray 3 (June-July 1986), S. 27-32

- Krick, Robert K.: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 14

 

 

Garnett, Robert Seldon:

CS-BrigGen; * 1819 Essex County/VA - 1861; stammte aus bedeutender Virginia Familie, sein Vater 12 Jahre lang Mitglied des Vir­ginia Congresses; Cousin von Richard Brooke *Garnett; West Point 1841 (27/52); Artillerie-Offizier in der US-Army; er diente an der Frontier, dann als Taktik-Lehrer in West Point; war aide-de-camp von Gen's Wool und Zachary *Taylor im Mexikokrieg, wobei er wegen Tapferkeit zwei Brevets erhielt, Beförderung zum Brevet Major nach Schlacht von Buena Vista / Mexikanischer Krieg; nach dem frühen Tode von Frau und Kind 1857 widmete er sein Leben der Army. Nach Ende des Krieges mit Mexiko war er Kommandant in West Point, nahm an den Indianerkriegen teil. 1861 trat er als Major aus der US-Army aus und schloß sich der CSA an. Bei Kriegsbeginn war Garnett Colonel und Adjutant-general der Active State Troops von Virginia (vgl. Taylor, For Years with General Lee, a.a.O., S. 11; Chestnut, Diary, a.a.O., S. 69: zu einer Begegnung am 27.6.1861) sowie Adjutant General Lee's; CS-BrigGen. Vor­kriegszeit: Seminolen, Mexiko. Bürgerkrieg: Rich Mountain und Laurel Hill, Corrick’s Ford (Rich Mountain); Garnett fällt in Cor­rick’s Ford / Rich Mountain als erster General des Krieges.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Boatner, a.a.O., S. 324-25

- Confederate Brigadier General Robert Seldon Garnett (1819-1861)

- Freeman, Douglas Southall: LEE’S LIEUTENANTS - Scribner’s, NY 1942-44 - im Original 3 Volumes, abgekürzte Ausgabe (zu­sammengestellt von Stephen W. Sears), New York 1998, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik41, S. 61

- Garnett, Robert S.: Papers, Myrtle Cooper-Schwarz Collection

 

 

Garnett, Thomas Stuart:

CS-Col; Co. F&S, 48th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 21).

 

Attended Virginia Military Institute 1843-1844 before resigning; attended and graduated from University of Virginia as physician 1850. Enlisted in the U.S. Army, 1st Virginia Regiment, to serve in the Mexican War. Practiced medicine in Bowling Green, Va. throughout the 1850s. Enlisted on 5/25/1861 at Westmoreland County, VA, he was commissioned into "C" Co. VA 9th Cavalry as a Captain. He was discharged for promotion on 6/27/1861; commissioned into Field & Staff VA 48th Infantry as Lt. Colonel (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 21.7.2016).

 

Anfang August 1862 war Garnett LtCol und Brigadekommandeur 2nd Brigade 1st Division bei Jackson's Vormarsch gegen Pope's Army of Virginia und beim Battle von Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 33; vgl. Battles and Lea­ders, Vol. II., a.a.O., S. 496; LtCol Thomas Seldon Garnett's Report OR 12.2 S. 199). Die Brigade Garnett umfaßte im August 1862 folgende Truppenteile: 1st Virginia Battalion (Irish Battalion), 21st Virginia, 42nd Virginia, 48th Virginia Infantry (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 364). In der Nacht vom 8.8.1862 auf den 9.8.1862 lag die Brigade zwischen dem Rapidan River und dem Ro­bertson's River (Karte bei Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 18), und vermied hierdurch, im Gegen­satz zu William B. Taliaferro's Brigade, Kämpfe mit der US-Cavalry (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 41; *Davidson, Charles Andrew: Letters, a.a.O., S. 28). Bei Beginn der Schlacht von Cedar Mountain war Garnett's Brigade auf der linken, verwundbaren Flanke der CS-Truppen, am Wheatfield bis zur Culpeper Road eingesetzt (vgl. Krick, Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 108 mit Karte S. 109). Jackson wies Garnett an, auf der Hut zu sein und bei Gefahr eines Flankenangriff sofort Verstärkungen anzufordern (vgl. Stack­pole: From Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 64).

 

Im Battle of Chancellorsville war Garnett Brigadekommandeur von Jones's Brigade (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 649n2; vgl. Sears: Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 329).

 

19.4.1828 Virginia - † 3.5.1863 gef., verstorben auf dem Weg ins Hospital nach Richmond nach tödlicher Verwundung im Battle of Chancellorsville (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., vo. II, S. 649n25, 702; vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 21.7.2016); beerd. Spy Hill Cemetery, King George County/VA (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 21.7.2016). Garnett stammte aus Bowling Green, Caroline County/VA; S. v. Henry Thomas and Elizabeth Garnett; °° Emma Lavinia Baber Garnett (1825-1906); Schwager von Sergeant Henry Baber (30th Regiment Virginia Infantry; † gef. 17.9.1862 Antietam) und Lt Dangerfield Lewis Baber (30th Regiment Virginia Infantry; † gef. 17.9.1862 Antietam) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 21.7.2016).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Freeman, Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 23, 26, m30-32, 34, 36-17, 40, 43, 587n, 589n, 590-91, 595, 649n, 659, 702

- Garnett, Thomas S.: Letter. Typescript of unpublished letter (2 July 1862) of Thomas S. Garnett of the 48th Virginia Infantry; Park Headquarters, Fredericksburg-Spotsylvania National Military Park, Fredericksburg, Va.

- Sears: Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 329-31, 366

 

 

Garrard, Kenner Dudley:

US-BrigGen; *13.9.1827 (nach a.A. September 1828; vgl. Evans, a.a.O., S. 485 Anm. 13) in Fairfield/Kentucky; aufgewachsen auf der Plantage seines Großvaters, der zweimal Gouverneur von Kentucky war; Garrard’s Vater, Jeptha Dudley Garrard war Anwalt in Cincinnati, sein Stiefvater Judge John McLean war Richter am US-Supreme Court. Garrard hatte vier Jahre lang das Virginia Betha­ny College besucht und anschließend zwei Jahre lang Rechtswissenschaften in Harvard studiert. Am 1.7.1847 gab Garrard das Stu­diagoons; nach der Beförderung zum 1st Lieutenant trat er im Frühjahr 1855 in die 2nd US-Cavalry ein. Die nächsten fünf Jahre ver­brachte er mit dieser Einheit in den Indianerkämpfen, machte jedoch meist Schreibtischarbeit als Regimentsadjutant. Garrard war von zu Hause aus wohlhabend und nicht auf das bescheidene Gehalt angewiesen. Nach der Sezession Texas’ verblieb er befehlsgemäß in San Antonio, wo er mit anderen Offizieren am 12.4.1861 arrestiert wurde. Auf Ehrenwort entlassen, begab sich Garrard nach Wa­shington, wo er zum Captain befördert wurde; sein Ehrenwort ließ jedoch zunächst keine Kampfeinsätze zu. Er war deshalb bis Sep­tember im der Commissary General’s Office tätig, wurde dann nach West Point als Hilfsausbilder f. Kavallerie versetzt und wurde bald Ausbilder für Artillerie und Kavallerie mit dem inoffiziellen Rang eines LtCol. Während seiner Zeit in West Point war er für eine ergänzte und von ihm herausgegebene Neuauflage des „Nolan’s System for Training Cavalry Horses“ verantwortlich. Nachdem sich Cassius Clay, der entschiedene Abolitionist, brieflich am 19.8.1862 bei Präsident Lincoln für Garrard einsetzte, arrangierte Kriegsminister Halleck auf Bitten des Präsidenten Garrard’s Versetzung als Col zur 146th New York Infantry. Als Regiments­kommandeur war er bei der Schlacht von Gettysburg mit der 146th New York (5th Army Corps, 2nd Division, 3rd Brigade) am ent­scheidenden Little Round Top eingesetzt, wurde wegen seiner Verdienste bei der Verteidigung im Juli 1863 zum BrigGen befördert wurde und übernahm eine Brigade. Nach Washington zurückberufen, diente er kurz im Cavalry Office, dessen Leitung er am 2.1.1864 über­nahm. Wegen der dortigen Zustände bat er bereits am 26.1.1864 um seine Versetzung; auf Grund seiner intensiven politischen Ver­bindungen wurde er binnen Wochenfrist Kommandeur der 2nd Cavalry Division Army of the Cumberland (Evans, a.a.O., S. 5-7)

 

Garrard kommandierte die 2. Kavallerie-Division, Kavallerie-Korps, Army of the Cumberland (vgl. Evans, Sherman’s Horsemen, S. 4 ff) während Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign, bestehend aus:

- 1st Brigade Col Robert H. G. Minty

- 4th Michigan Cavalry

- 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry

- 4th US-Cavalry

 

- 2nd Brigade Col Eli Long / Col Beroth B. Eggleston

- 1st Ohio Cavalry

- 3rd Ohio Cavalry

- 4th Ohio Cavalry

 

3rd Brigade (Lightning Brigade) Col Abram O. Miller

- 17th Indiana Mounted Infantry

- 72nd Indiana Mounted Infantry

- 98th Illinois Mounted Infantry

- 123rd Illinois Mounted Infantry

 

- Artillery:

- Chicago Board of Trade Battery, Lt George I. Robinson

 

Sherman kritisierte Garrard hart und warf ihm vor, als Kavallerie-Offizier ungeeignet zu sein (Evans; a.a.O., S. 4 ff.)

 

Nach dem Krieg war Garrard Gouverneur von Kentucky (Evans, a.a.O., S. 485 Anm. 14 +++prüfen+++)

 

zu den Angriffen von Garrard’s 2nd Division während der Atlanta Campaign:

 

- Rottenwood Creek 3.4.7.1864 vgl.:

Evans, Sherman’s Horsemen, a.a.O., S. 10;

The Macon Daily Telegraph, 6 July 1864, p. 1, and 9 July 1864, p. 2, put Garrard’s losses on July 3 at „about thirty killed and fifty wounded, together with fifty Spencer rifles and about thirty horses.“ Garrard’s casualties actually numbered one killed, two wounded, and two missing (one of whom returned the next morning) on July 3, and three wounded, one of them mortally, on July 4. (vgl. dazu Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 38, pt. 2, pp. 804, 813, 837-38, 842; pt. 5, p. 48; Crofts, comp., History of the Service of the *Third Ohio Veteran Volunteer Cavalry, p. 152; Daily Toledo [Ohio] Blade [ DTB], 18 July 1864, p. 2; Sandusky [Ohio] Daily Commercial Register [SCR], 20 July 1864, p. 2, Magee, *72nd Indiana, pp. 328-31; Records Diary, 3-4 July 1864; Am­brose Remley to „Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers,“ 2 July 1864, Ambrose Remley Papers: Morning Reports, 3-4 July 1864, Company A, *72nd Indiana Mounted Infantry, RG 94; „List of Casualties in the 2nd Brigade 2nd Division Cavalry U.S.A.,“ pp. 64 - 65, vol. 57 / 140, Cavalry Corps Military Division of the Mississippi (hereafter cited as CCMDM), Records of U.S. Army Continen­tal Commands, 1821-1920, RG 393; Compiled Service Records, RG 94. (Zitate aus Evans, Sherman’s Horsemen, a.a.O., S. 4, 485 Anm. 17)

 

zu dem weiteren Vorgehen von Garrard’s 2nd Division vgl (aus Evans, a.a.O., S. 485/86 Anm. 18):

The movements of Garrard’s division on July 5 are based on the following sources: Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 38, pt. 2, p. 813; pt. 5, p. 60; Stanley Lathrop to „Dear Father and Folks at home,“ 9 July 1864 (description of camp routine), Stanley Lathrop Papers; Vale, Minty and the Cavalry (State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, pp. 265, 321; John G. Lem­mon Diary, 4 July 1864; John C. McLain Diary, 5 July I 64; Henry Albert Potter Diary, 5 July 1864; Henry Albert Potter to „Dear Fa­ther,“ 10 July 1 Henry Albert Potter Papers; Detroit Free Press, 19 July 1864, p. 1, Regimental Return, July 1864, 4th Michi­gan Ca­valry, reel 83, M - 594, Compiled Records Showing Service of Military Units in Volunteer Union Organizations, RG 94; MJP­GA, 20 August 1864, p. 1; Sipes, The Seventh ++weiter Evans S. 484

 

Photo:

- Evans: Sherman's Horsemen, a.a.O., S. 6

 

 

Garret, Hosea:

CS-Pvt (?); Fahnenträger 10th Texas Infantry (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 410, 450).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Garret, Hosea: Letter (Atlanta Historical Society, Atlanta / Georgia)

 

 

Garrett, John A.:

US-Col, 40th Iowa Infantry (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, III 1148).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Campbell, Angus K.: "Col. John A. Garrett." Annals of Iowa. Vols. VIII-IX (1870-71

 

 

Garrett, John Work:

Baltimore Banker und seit 1858 Präsident der Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Garrett benachrichtigte US-Finanzminister Chase am 5.1.1862 vom Angriff Stonewall Jackson's auf Hancock / MD und vom Rückzug der US-Truppen.

 

 

Garrison, William Lloyd:

als Sklave geboren und in den Norden geflüchtet; führender Abolitionist, "der radikale Genius" des Kampfes gegen die Sklaverei; 1805-1879; aus Boston, Massachusetts; Journalist und Zeitungsverleger; er gab in Boston seit 1831, für die Dauer von 35 Jahren, die Zeitung der American Anti-Slavery Society. He did not believe in using force to gain his ends but rather relied on moral persuasion. Garrison war auch ein ausgesprochener Gegner der Kir­chen. Sein Programm war reine Agitation (vgl. Randall, a.a.O., S. 101). Garri­son opposed the war until Lincoln issued the Emancipa­tion Proclamation. Although he engaged in numerous other reforms, Garrison is most famous for his stand on slavery (vgl. Boatner, S. 326; Davis: Brother against Brother, a.a.O., S. 65).

 

Photos:

- Davis: Brother against Brother, a.a.O., S. 65

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Thomas, John L.: The Libertator, William Lloyd Garrison (Boston, 1963)

 

 

Garrot, Isham W.:

CS-BrigGen; stammt aus Alabama; er fiel bei der Verteidigung von Vicksburg am 17.6.1863, noch bevor ihn die bereits erfolgte Be­förderung zum BrigGen erreichte

 

Photo:

Davis/Wiley, Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 47

 

 

Gartrell, Lucius Jeremiah:

CS-BrigGen, 1821-91; Georgia; Sohn eines prominenten Planters, besuchte die University of Georgia und Randolph-Macon. Er stu­dierte Law in Robert Toombs Anwaltskanzlei; wurde 1850 in die Georgia State Legislature und den US-Congress gewählt (Anm.: er wandte sich im Wahlkampf gegen die von Toombs unterstützen Compromise measures of 1850 [Fugitive Slave Law: von US-Senator James Murray Mason 1850, dem späteren CS-Botschafter in Frankreich, formuliert. Toombs kandidierte 1850 als Kandidat für die Georgia State Convention gegen Lucius Jeremiah Gartrell, wobei Toombs den Compromise von 1850 unterstützte, während Gartrell diesen ablehnte; vgl. Porter: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 3 und Anm. S. 556).

 

Als Angehöriger des extremen States-Rights-Flügels der Whig-Partei, schloß er sich in der Folge der Demokratischen Partei an, und verzichtete auf seinen Sitz im US-Senat während der Sezession Georgias. Col. 7th Georgia Infantry; führte sein Regiment bei 1st Ma­nassas, wobei sein 16jähriger Sohn gefallen ist. Im Oktober 1861 in den CSA-Congress gewählt und zum BrigGen ernannt am 22.8.1864. Er führte seine Brigade der GA-Reserves in South Carolina und wurde gegen Kriegsende verwundet. In der Nachkriegs­zeit erfolgreicher Strafverteidiger (aus Boatner, a.a.O., S. 326).

 

 

Gascell, Peter Penn:

US-Captain; er gehörte im April/May 1863 zum Stab von BrigGen John Buford's Cavalry Brigade (vgl. Battles and Leaders III: Sto­neman's Raid in the Chancellorsville Campaign, S. 152)

 

Während Stoneman's Raid in the Chancellorsville Campaign, April-Mai 1863 (Central Virginia Raid) sollte der linke Flügel von Sto­neman's Cavalry bestehend aus der Cavalry Division von BrigGen David M. *Gregg, plus eine reserve brigade under BrigGen John Buford, and a horse-drawn battery, die Virginia Central RR bei Louisa Court House (12 mi südöstlich von Gordonsville) unterbre­chen, und dann weiter vorstoßen nach Hanover Junction und zur Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac RR (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids, a.a.O., S. 158; vgl. Johnston: Virginia Railroads, a.a.O., S. 144).

 

 

Gaston, H.:

CS-Captain; Co B 42nd Mississippi Infantry (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 116).

 

 

Gates, Elijah:

CS-Col; Regimentskommandewur 1st Missouri Cavalry; Einsatz gegen den US-Vorstoß von Curtis Army of the Southwest gegen *Springfield / Missouri am 10.2.1862 (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 27).

 

 

Gates, Theodore B.:

US-Col, 20th New York Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gates, Theodore B. (Colonel 20th NYSM): The Civil War Diaries of Colonel Theodore B. Gates Twentieth New York State Militia (Longstreet House, 1992); Edited by Seward Osborne; 197pp, Illustrated, 11 Maps, Index

 

 

Gathright, R. D.:

CS-Captain; Co. H, 4th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5); Captain Scott war bereits an der Aufstellung des Regiments im September 1862 beteiligt (vgl. Mosgrove: Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie, a.a.O., S. 16).

 

 

Gault, B. H.:

US-Pvt; Co. H 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History. Vol: 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 324

 

 

Gearhart, Edwin R.:

US-Pvt; Signal Corps US Volunteers (vgl. National Park Soldiers M1290 Roll 3).

 

 

Gearhart, Edwin R.:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 142nd Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 42).

 

8:6:1832 - † 29.12.1930; beerd. Fairview Cemetery, Allentown, Lehigh County/PA; der Eintrag auf seinem Grabstein lautet „Compa­ny G, 142nt PA. Volunteers (vgl. www.findagrave.com; dort wird allerdings aufgrund eines Lesefehlers angegeben: „Co.C“).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gearhart, Edwin R.: Reminiscenses of the Civil War (Stroudsburg/PA, 1901)

 

 

Geary, John W.:

US-BrigGen; Geary war in der Vorkriegszeit 1856 von Präsident Pierce als Governor im Kansas Territory eingesetzt worden um das politisch zerrissene Land zu einen. Er führte seine Regierung entschlossen und durchsetzungskräftig. Die Gegenregierung von Free State Men in Topeca stand unter der Führung von Charles *Robinson. Er verhandelte mit Robinson um eine einheitliche Regierung unter Geary auf Basis der Topeca Constitution zu erreichen, sah sich jedoch der Opposition der Proslavery Extremists ausgesetzt, die die Absetzung von Geary und den Eintritt des Kansas Territory als Sklavenstaat in die USA zu erreichen suchten (vgl. Nevins: The Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 133). Nach der der gegen seinen Willen verabschiedeten *Lecompton Constitution, nach viel­fachen persönlichen Beleidigungen, Denunziationen und Bedrohungen trat Geary am 4.3.1857 zurück (vgl. Nevins: The Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 139, 141).

 

Im September 1861 war Geary Befehlshaber der US-Truppen in Harper's Ferry (vgl. McDonald: Laurel Brigade, a.a.O., S. 25).

 

Im Frühjahr 1862 war Geary Brigadekommandeur in McDowell's Department of the Rappahannock. Seine Brigade war eingesetzt bei der Reparatur der Manassas Gap Railroad (vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 159).

 

Im Battle of Gettysburg Divisionskommandeur 2nd Division XII Army Corps Slocum (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg: The Second Day, a.a.O., S. 453). Die 2nd Division war zunächst auf dem linken Flügel von Cemetery Ridge bis zu Little Round Top eingesetzt und wurde gegen 17.00 auf Befehl Meade's abzogen und zum XII Army Corps an Culp's Hill verlegt. Die Position sollte das III. Army Corps unter Sickles übernehmen (vgl. Sauers: Meade-Sickles Controversy, a.a.O., S. 31). Geary's Führung in Gettysburg wird als völlig ungenügend beurteilt (vgl. Coddington: The Gettysburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 433-34).

 

Während Sherman's Atlanta Campaign führte Geary die 2nd Division in MajGen Joseph P. Hooker XX Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland: Die Division umfaßte folgende Einheiten:

- 1st Brigade Col Charles Candy

- 5th Ohio Infantry Col John H. Patrick

- 7th Ohio Infantry LtCol Samuel McClelland

- 29th Ohio Infantry Col William T. Fitch

- 66th Ohio Infantry LtCol Eugene Powell

- 28th Pennsylvania Infantry LtCol John Flynn

- 147th Pennsylvania Infantry Col Ario Pardee

- 2nd Brigade Col Adolphus Buschbeck

- 33rd New York Infantry Col George W. Mindil

- 119th New York Infantry Col J. T. Lockman

- 134th New York Infantry LtColAllen H. Jackson

- 154th New York Infantry Col P. H. Jones

- 27th Pennsylvania Infantry LtCol August Riedt

- 109th Penn. Infantry Captain Frederick L. Gimber

- 3rd Brigade Col David Ireland

- 60th New York Infantry Col Abel Godard

- 78th New York Infantry LtCol Harvey S. Chatfield

- 102nd New York Infantry Col James C. Lane

- 137th New York Inf. LtCol Koert S. Van Voorhis

- 149th New York Infantry LtCol Charles S. Randall

- 29th Pennsylvania Infantry Col William Rickards

- 111th Col George A. Cobham

- Artillery

- 13rd New York Artilery Captain William Wheeler

 

Geary führte am 8.5.1864 den Angriff auf Dun Gap an den westlichen Ausläufern von Rocky Face Ridge westlich Dalton (vgl. Cas­tel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 131-33).

 

 

Geddes, Andrew:

US-Sgt; 105th Ohio Infantry

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History of the Civil War, vol II, a.a.O., S. 122

 

 

Geddes, James M.:

US-Col; 8th Iowa Infantry; das Regiment gehörte im Battle of Shiloh unter Col Geddes zur 3rd Brigade Col Thomas W. Sweeny 2nd Division W.H.L. Wallace in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 319; Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shi­loh, B & L, a.a.O., I, S. 537).

 

 

Geer, Allan Morgan:

US-1stLt; Co. C, 20th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 32).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Anderson, Mary Ann (ed.): The Civil War Diary of Allen Morgan Geer, Twentieth Regiment, Illinois Infantry (New York, 1977)

 

 

Geer, John James:

US-Captain; 48th Ohio Infantry

 

Im Frühjahr 1862 und im Battle of Shiloh gehörte das Regiment zur 4th Brigade Col Ralph P. *Buckland 5th Division BrigGen Wil­liam T. Sherman in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 320, 131; Grant, U. S.: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh; in: B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 538). Mitte März 1862 war die 48th Ohio Infantry bei Savannah / Süd-Tennessee eingesetzt (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 77 mit Anm. 60 S. 337)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Geer, John James (Captain, 48th Ohio Infantry): Beyond the Lines, or: A Yankee Prisoner Loose in Dixie (Philadephia 1863; Re­printed); 285 pp, Illustrated

 

 

George, Henry:

CS-Pvt; Co. A, 7th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll5).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **George, Henry: "The 7th Kentucky at Shiloh" (Shiloh National Military Park, Shiloh / Tennessee: 7th Kentucky File)

- **George, Henry: History of the 3d, 7th, 8th and 12th Kentucky Infantry, C.S.A. (Louisville, Kentucky, 1911)

- **(vgl. National George, Henry (Pvt, 7th Kentucky Mounted Infantry): Diary (Shiloh National Military Park, Shiloh / Tennessee: 7th Kentucky File)

 

 

George, Henry:

CS-Col; 1st Regiment Tennessee Infantry; zunächst war Henry Second Lieutenant Co. H 1st Regiment Tennessee Infantry, dann Lieutenant (vgl. National Park Soldiers M231 Roll 16). Im Battle of Chancellorsville 2.-6.5.1863 war Col Henry George Regiments­kommandeur 1st Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Archer's Brigade (vgl. Newton: McPherson's Ridge, a.a.O., S. 26).

 

 

George, Samuel W.:

US-Corporal; 1826- Dezember 1862; 12th New Hampshire Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Fredericksburg 1862. Er war derart krank, daß er an der Schlacht nicht teilnehmen konnte und starb einige Tage später Ende 1862 (vgl. Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 54; Bartlett, Asa W.: History of the Twelfth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion [Concord, N.H.: Ira C. Evans, 1897], S. 704)

 

 

Georgetown, D. C.:

US-Pvt; 109th New York Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Georgetown, D. C.: Letter, for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms91-042).

 

 

Gerrish, George A.:

US-Captain (vgl. OR 12 [2] S. 623); Batteriechef von Gerrish's New Hampshire Battery (=1st New Hampshire Artillery). Vom 5.-8.8.1862 führte die Division Rufus *King mehrere Expeditions von Fredericksburg aus nach Frederick's Hall Station, Va. und Spot­sylvania Court House, Va, durch die Brigade Gibbon durch mit dem Ziel, die für den Süden lebenswichtige Central Virginia RR zu zerstören (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 121-22). Die Expedition nach *Frederick's Hall Station wurde von BrigGen Gibbon ge­führt (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 122; Gibbon's Report OR 12 [2] S. 122-23), diejenige nach *Spotsylvania Court House stand unter der Führung von Col Lysander Cutler; die Unterstützung erfolgte durch Truppen unter Gen. John P. *Hatch (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 122). Ziel von Gibbon's Expedition war die Zerstörung der Virginia Central RR. Bei diesem mit zwei Zangen durchge­führten Vorstoß eingesetzt wurden: an der Spotsylvania Court House Road: die 6th Wisconsin Infantry (Col. Lysander *Cutler), Har­ris Cavalry (2nd New York Cavalry), und eine Abteilung von Gerrish's New Hampshire Battery. Die Abteilung unter der persönlichen Führung Gibbon's, die auf der Telegraph Road vorstieß umfaßte 2nd Wisconsin, 7th Wisconsin, 19th Indiana, 3rd Indiana Cavalry und Monroe's Rhode Island Battery (vgl. Gibbons's Report OR 12 [2] S. 122). Hierbei kam es zu wiederholten Feuergefechten bei Thornburg, Va. (sog. Affair of Thornburg 5.-6.8.1862), (vgl. Gibbon's Report, a.a.O.; Gibbons: Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 41; Gaff: On Many a Bloody Field, a.a.O., S. 146; Cutler's Report OR 12 [2] S. 123-24). Durch Soldaten der 19th Indiana wurde dabei das Gebäude der Thornburg's Mill ausgeraubt und zerstört (vgl. Gaff: On Many a Bloody Field, a.a.O., S. 146; Stevenson, David: In­dianas Role of Honor, vol. 1 [Indianapolis: A. D. Streight, 1864], S. 352; Marsh, Henry C: Papers [Indiana Division, Indiana State Li­brary, Indianapolis]; Nolan: Iron Brigade, a.a.O., S. 65-66).

 

 

Gerrish, Theodore:

19.6.1846 Oakfield, Aroostook County/Maine - † 9.2.1923 Summertown, Lawrence County/Tennessee (vgl. http://www.findagrave. com); US-Pvt; Co. H, 20th Maine Infantry (vgl. Penny / Laine: Struggle for the Round Tops, a.a.O., S. 87, 97).

 

Theodore enlisted Company H of the 20th Maine Regiment when he was just 16 years old. He was with the regiment from its foun­ding in 1862 through its mustering out in 1865 except for the summer of 1863 when he was sick in a hospital in Philadelphia and in 1864 when he was recovering from a wound suffered in The Wilderness. After the war he wrote several books including "Army Life: A Private's Reminiscences of the Civil War" which is the only history of his famous regiment written by a member of it. After the Ci­vil War, he became a minister before moving to the Dakota's where he became wealthy through land speculating. He died in Tennes­see in 1923 (vgl. http://www.findagrave. Com).

 

Photo:

Theodore Gerrish (vgl. http://www.findagrave. Com).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- An Old Private [Theodore **Gerrish]: „The Twentieth Maine at Gettysburg,“ Portland Advertiser, Mar. 13, 188

- **Gerrish, Theodore (20th Maine Infantry): Army Life: Reminiscenses of the Civil War (Portland, Maine 1882; reprint Stan Clark Books); 400 pages; new introduction by John Pullen); Photo of Gerrish pasted to front endpaper. A memoir of the 20th Maine Infan­try. This is the only full-length book by a member of the 20th Maine

- **Gerrish, Theodore: "Battle of Gettysburg." National Tribune, 23 November 1882

- **Gerrish, Theodore and John S. Hutchinson: The blue and the gray : a graphic history of the Army of the Potomac and that of Nor­thern Virginia, including the brilliant engagements of these forces from 1861 to 1865, Bangor, Me. : Brady, Mace, 1884

- Nichols, James H.: „Letter of Theodore Gerrish,“ Lincoln County News, April 1882

 

 

Getty, George Washington:

US-MajGen; aus Washington D.C.; kommandierte als BrigGen die 3rd Division des IX. Corps im Battle of Fredericksburg (vgl. Alexander: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 179); verwundet im Battle of the Wilderness als Brigadekommandeur in Han­cock's 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac (vgl. Porter: Campaining with Grant, a.a.O., S. 52)

 

 

Getty, Robert:

US-Lt. zur See; Kommandant des Tinclad USS Marmora; Teilnahme an der Yazoo River Expedition Nov. / Dez. 1862 (vgl. Bearss: Hardluck Ironclad, a.a.O., S. 90; ORN XXIII S. 515-17, 688-89).

 

 

Gibbon, John:

US BrigGen.; geb. 1827 in Pennsylvania; aufgewachsen in North Carolina; West Point 1847 (20/38); Artillerieoffizier; Teilnahme am Seminolenkrieg und Mexikokrieg; anschließend in Camp Floyd/Utah Territorium eingesetzt (Gibbon, Personal Recollections, S. 3, 6). Gibbon war ein begeisterter Artillerist und war zeitweise Artillerie Instructor in West Point. Gibbon hat ein ausführliches Artille­rie-Handbuch herausgegeben, welches die offizielle Empfehlung des US-War Departments erhielt (vgl. Gaff: Brave Men's Tears, a.a.O., S. 35).

 

Gibbon beteiligte sich als Artillery-Instructor an der neuen Strategie-Debatte und der Rolle der Artillery, die sich an die Einführung des leistungstarken Enfield-Gewehrs anschloß (vgl. Nosworthy: Bloody Crucible, a.a.O., S. 51).

 

Captain seit 1857; 1861 war Gibbon Captain der Battery B, 4th US Artillery; die Sezession traf seine Familie hart; seine Frau stamm­te aus Baltimore, drei seiner Brüder folgten der Sezession; er war als Chef der Artillerie in McDowells Division bis 2.5.1862 einge­setzt, dann des 1st Army Corps Army of the Potomac; zum BrigGen befördert am 21.4.1862 (Gibbon: Personal Recollections, S. 26); seit 9.5.1862 Kommandeur 4th Brigade First Division Third Corps Army of Virginia, der Iron Brigade (Venner: 19th In­diana Infantry S. 18, 120), umfassend 19th Indiana Infantry, 2nd, 6th und 7th Wisconsin Infantry. Bei Übernahme des Kommandos über die *Iron Brigade am 9.5.1862 war Gibbon 35 Jahre alt (Venner, a.a.O., S. 120 Anm. 71; Gaff, a.a.O., S. 35). Gibbon unter­nimmt auf Befehl von Rufus B. King (dessen Division im Juli 1862 in Fredericksburg lag) eine bewaffnete Aufklärung nach *Orange Court House, Va., bestehend u.a. aus 3rd Indiana Cavalry unter Captain Lemon ab 25.7.1862 wegen der Gefahr einer Flankierung durch CS-Truppen unter Gen. Stonewall Jackson u.a. mit der 2nd Wisconsin (vgl. Gibbon: Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 41; King's Report OR 12 [2] S. 104-105; Gibbon's Report OR 12 [2] S. 105-106).

 

Vom 5.-8.8.1862 führte die Division Rufus *King mehrere Expeditions von Fredericksburg aus nach Frederick's Hall Station, Va. und Spotsylvania Court House, Va, durch die Brigade Gibbon durch mit dem Ziel, die für den Süden lebenswichtige Central Virginia RR zu zerstören (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 121-22). Die Expedition nach *Frederick's Hall Station wurde von BrigGen Gibbon geführt (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 122; Gibbon's Report OR 12 [2] S. 122-23), diejenige nach *Spotsylvania Court House stand unter der Führung von Col Lysander Cutler; die Unterstützung erfolgte durch Truppen unter Gen. John P. *Hatch (vgl. King's Report, OR 12 [2] S. 122). Ziel von Gibbon's Expedition war die Zerstörung der Virginia Central RR. Bei diesem mit zwei Zangen durchgeführten Vorstoß eingesetzt wurden: an der Spotsylvania Court House Road: die 6th Wisconsin Infantry (Col. Lysander *Cut­ler), Harris Cavalry (2nd New York Cavalry), und eine Abteilung von Gerrish's New Hampshire Battery. Die Abteilung unter der per­sönlichen Führung Gibbon's, die auf der Telegraph Road vorstieß umfaßte 2nd Wisconsin, 7th Wisconsin, 19th Indiana, 3rd Indiana Cavalry und Monroe's Rhode Island Battery (vgl. Gibbons's Report OR 12 [2] S. 122). Hierbei kam es zu wiederholten Feuergefech­ten bei Thornburg, Va. (sog. Affair of Thornburg 5.-6.8.1862), (vgl. Gibbon's Report, a.a.O.; Gibbons: Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 41; Gaff: On Many a Bloody Field, a.a.O., S. 146; Cutler's Report OR 12 [2] S. 123-24). Durch Soldaten der 19th Indiana wurde dabei das Gebäude der Thornburg's Mill ausgeraubt und zerstört (vgl. Gaff: On Many a Bloody Field, a.a.O., S. 146; Stevenson, Da­vid: Indianas Role of Honor, vol. 1 [Indianapolis: A. D. Streight, 1864], S. 352; Marsh, Henry C: Papers [Indiana Division, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis]; Nolan: Iron Brigade, a.a.O., S. 65-66).

 

Gibbon stammte aus North Carolina; Gibbon blieb nach der Sezession der US-Armee treu (vgl. Nolan MilAmerik5 S. IX; vgl. auch Felton, Silas: The Iron Brigade Battery; in: Nolan/Vipond, Giants in their Black Hats, a.a.O., S. 143 ff.); seine drei Brüder dagegen traten in die CS-Army ein (vgl. Gibbon, Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 9); Gibbon wurde wegen seiner Herkunft als unloyal ver­dächtigt (vgl. Gibbon: Personal Recollections, a.a.O., S. 32, 40), sein Spitzname war "the Southern Renegate" (Gaff, a.a.O., S. 37). Im Juni 1862 behauptete BrigGen Doubleday's Adjutant gegenüber dem 'Congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War', Gib­bon sei äußerst mitfühlend gegenüber konföderierten Familien in Fredericksburg gewesen (vgl. Gaff, a.a.O., S. 37 m.w.N.).

 

Gibbon war in seiner Brigade nicht hoch angesehen, wie Schilderungen zeigen:

"As an officer he is arbitrary, severe, and exacting, requiring a complete subservience to his caprices as the condition of his favor. As a man he is distant, formal and reserved, standing very much on dignity of position, pursuing with a narrow vindictiveness those whom he supposes to be crossing his path." (C. A. Woodruff, "In Memory of Major General John Gibbon," Personal Recollections of the War of the Rebellion [New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1897], Vol. II, 294; E. B. Quiner, Correspondence of Wisconsin Military Organizations, IV, 25, State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin. Quiner clipped various articles from Wisconsin newspapers and arranged them in ten volumes according to military unit; weitere negative Meinungen bei Gaff, a.a.O., S. 36, m.w.N.).

 

Es mag sich hierbei um persönliche Abneigung handeln, da Gibbon andererseits sehr geschätzt wurde. Dawes (Service with the Sixth Wisconsin, a.a.O., S. 43) beurteilt Gibbon folgendermaßen: "He soon manifested superior qualities as a brigade commander. Tho­roughly educated in the military profession, he had also high personal qualifications to exercise command. He was anxious that his brigade should excel in every way, and while he was an exacting disciplinarian he had the good sense to recognize merit where it exist­ed. His administration of the command left a lasting impression for good upon the character and military tone of the brigade, and his splendid personal bravery upon the field of battle was an inspiration."

 

Gibbon’s „Black Hats“ (das aus Iren und Skandinaviern rekrutierte 2., 6., 7. Wisconsin und 19th Indiana Infantry), später als *Iron Brigade (of the West) bekannt, und die im Shenandoahtal aus Einwanderern rekrutierte Stonewall-Brigade bezahlten ihre Einsätze im Bürgerkrieg mit dem höchsten Blutzoll auf beiden Seiten der Front); Einsätze: 28.8.1862 *Brawner’s Farm (auch Battle of Gaines­ville; Verluste: ca. 750 Mann; Venner S. 25); South Mountain 5.9.1862 (Venner S. 29, 127 Anm. 69); Sharpsburg / Antietam 6.9.1862 (Venner S. 29); Divisionskommandeur seit Nov 1862 (sein Nachfolger als Kommandeur der Iron Brigade war Solomon *Meredith)

 

Kommandeur Second Division in John Reynold's First Corps vor Fredericksburg; dort verwundet und dienstunfähig bis 23.5.1863; nach Genesung Kommandeur der 2nd Division in General Wilfield Scott Hancock's Second Corps, Teilnahme an der Schlacht von Chancellorsville im Mai 1863; Kommandeur II. Corps (1.-2.7.1863) bei Gettysburg, nachdem der bisherige Corps-Kommandeur *Hancock nach dem Tod Reynold's den Left Wing der Potomac Armee bei Gettysburg übernehmen mußte (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 37; Gibbon: Recollections, a.a.O., S. 132 ff). Am 3. Tag der Schlacht von Gettysburg schwer verwundet; in Gettysburg kommandierte Gibbon am 3. Tag einer der zur Verteidigung der Cemetery Ridge gegen den Angriff von Pettigrew, mit dem Gibbon seit seiner Stationierung in Charleston im Frühjahr 1861 eng befreundet war. Nach seiner Genesung 1864 Teilnahme an der Overland Campaign; Juni 1864 MajGen USV; Kommandeur des 24th Army Corps Army of the James; 1865 mit seinem Corps Teilnahme an den letzten Schlachten des Krieges; er war einer der Offiziere die ausgewählt wurden um Gen. Lee's Kapitulation entgegenzuneh­men.

 

In der Nachkriegszeit Col der regulären US-Army; zugleich Col. 36th US-Infantry, den 7th Infantry; er befreite die Überlebenden von Custer's Truppen nach dessen Niederlage bei Little Big Horn 1876; eingesetzt an der Western Frontier, 1876 befördert zum Brig­Gen der regulären Army'; Ruhestand 1891, gestorben in Baltimore 1896, beigesetzt auf dem Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Photo:

BrigGen John Gibbon (Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0915)

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Dawes, Rufus R.: Service with the Sixth Wisconsin (Marietta, Ohio: E. R. Alderman & Sons, 1890. Reprinted by Morningside Hou­se)

- Gaff, Alan D. u. Gaff, Maureen: The dread reality of war - Gibbon’s Brigade, August 28 - September 17, 1862; in Nolan, Alan T. and Vipond, Sharon Eggleston (Hrsg.): Giants in their tall Black Hats - Essays on the Iron Brigade, Bloomington/Indiana 1998, Bi­bliothek Ref MilAmerik5, S. 67 ff.

- Gibbon, John: „Sketches from the Battle-Fields of the War: Gettysburg – The Second Day; in: Gibbon Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania

- Gibbon, John: Papers. Historical Society of Pennsylvania

- Gibbon, John: Personal Recollections of the Civil War (Dayton, Ohio: Press of Morningside Bookshop 1988, Reprinted from the 1928 edition published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik66

- Gibbon, John (Brig-Gen., U. S. Vols): Artillerist's Manual (Morningside reprint of 1863 Original); 463 pp; 281 Illustrations; 20 fol­ding plates, Index

- Gibbon, John: Adventures on the Western Frontier (Indiana University Press); 288 p.; Photos; Details Gibbon's experiences in the West from 1860 through 1870 when he was campaigned and scouted the area.

“+++klären++. The Ascent of South Mountain; in: Nolan/Vipond: Giants in their Black Hats. Essays on the Iron Brigade, a.a.O, MilAmerik5, S. 13 ff.

- Nolan, Alan T. and Vipond, Sharon Eggleston (Hrsg.): Giants in their tall Black Hats - Essays on the Iron Brigade, Bloomington/In­diana 1998

- Venner, William Thomas: The 19th Indiana Infantry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 18-19, 22, 27-28, 35

- US National Archives, Record Group 393, Records of US Army Continental Command, Gibbons Brigade, General Orders

 

 

Gibbon, Nicholas:

CS-Captain Comp. I 28th North Carolina Infantry. Nicholas Gibbon war der Bruder von US-BrigGen John Gibbon

 

Photo:

- Speer, Voices from Cemetary Hill, a.a.O., S. 49

 

 

Gibbons, Col.:

CS-Col; aus Frankfort / KY (erwähnt bei Ruffin Diary II 96)

 

 

Gibbons, John R.:

CS-Pvt; Co I, 1st (Rockbridge) Virginia Cavalry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- John R. Gibbons: Diary and letter, 1862-1863; 2 items: The diary consists of brief entries kept by Private John R. Gibbons, Compa­ny I, First (Rockbridge) Virginia Cavalry, while on duty from January 1 to October 16, 1862, in northern Virginia. The entries pertain to places such as Culpepper Court House and Brandy Station, Virginia, and are very terse. For example, Gibbons describes the battle of Antietam, Maryland, as "a very hard fight" with no further elaboration. A copy of a letter, dated Mount Solon, Augusta County, Virginia, October 3, 1863, is also included. Written by a cousin identified only as "Sue," the letter describes local gossip, Sue's tea­ching activities, and a reaction to Gibbons's assertion of trading with Union soldiers while on picket duty. Typed transcript (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Gibbons, S. B.:

CS-Col;

 

 

Gibbs, George A.:

CS-Pvt; 18th Mississippi Infantry (vgl. Davis: Battle of Bull run, a.a.O., S. 24)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gibbs, George A.: "With a Mississippi Private in ... the Battle of First Bull Run," Civil War Times Illustrated IV (April 1965), S. 42-43

 

 

Gibson, Augustus Abel:

US-Col (brevet); Berufsoffizier im Rang eines Major der US-Regular Army; Gibson kommandierte ab 3.8.1862 das 122th Pennsylva­nia Infantry (redesignated 2nd Regiment Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery) in Fort *Gibson im Verteidigungsring im die Hauptstadt Wa­shington (vgl. Ledoux: „Quite ready to be sent somewhere“. The Civil War Letters of Aldace Freeman Walker, a.a.O., S. 14 Anm. 13, S. 24; vgl.  Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II: Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Wa­shington, a.a.O., S. 176-77). Col Gibson war 1862 auch Kommandant von Fort Lincoln im Verteidigungsring von Washington (vgl. Ledoux: „Quite ready to be sent somewhere“. The Civil War Letters of Aldace Freeman Walker, a.a.O., S. 24).

 

Mitte 1864 wurde Gibson Kommandant des Kriegsgefangenenlagers Fort Warren und blieb bis Mitte Januar 1865 auf diesem Posten (vgl. Speer: Portals to Hell, a.a.O.). Vorausgegangen war eine bittere Auseinandersetzung zwischen Gibson und Pennsylvania Gover­nor Andrew G. Curtin over the issuance of commissions to newly-promoted officers and other matters, worauf Gibson am 22.7.1864 seines Kommandos enthoben wurde (vgl. Hunt: Colonels in Blue, a.a.O., S. 72).

 

 

Gibson, Claude:

CS-Captain (?); Gibson's Battery; eingesetzt an 1.3.1862 bei Pittsburg Landing am Tennessee River, wo es zu einem Artillerieduell mit den US-Gunboats Tyler und Lexington kam (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 70).

 

 

Gibson, James:

US-Photographer; little is known of him; possibly he had a business association with Mathew Brady (vgl. Frassanito: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 234; vgl. Cobb: Mathew Brady's Photographic Gallery, a.a.O., p. 29, 33-36).

 

 

Gibson, J. Thompson:

US-Sergeant; Co. A, 78th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. Gibson, J. T.: History of the Seventy-Eights Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 196; Anm.: bei National Park Soldiers nicht genannt); enlisted Oct. 12, 1861; wounded at New Hope Church, Ga., May 27, 1864; discharged Dec. 28, to date Nov. 4. 1864, expiration of term (vgl. Gibson, J. T.: History of the Seventy-Eights Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 196).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Gibson, J. T.: History of the Seventy-Eights Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (Pittsburgh Printing 1905; 1st Edition); Maps, Photos; Complete Rosters

 

 

Gibson, Randall Lee:

CS-BrigGen; 1832-1892; aus Kentucky; graduating in Yale, dann Studium der Rechtswissenschaft an der LA-University und ausge­dehnte Reisen in Europa. Amerikanischer Attaché in Madrid. Nach einem Jahr Rückkehr in die USA, Rechtsanwalt und Sugar Plan­ter in Louisiana. 1861 zunächst ADC bei T. O. Moore; März 1861 Captain 1st Louisiana Artillery. Col 13th Louisiana Infantry (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 341). 1862 während der Shiloh-Campaign war Col Gibson Brigadekommandeur der 1st Brigade Gibson 1st Divi­sion BrigGen Daniel Ruggles II. Army Corps MajGen Braxton Bragg. Die Brigade umfaßte folgende Regimenter (vgl. Daniel: Shi­loh, a.a.O., S. 321):

- 1st Arkansas Infantry

- 4th Louisiana Infantry

- 13th Louisiana Infantry

- 19th Louisiana Infantry

- Vaiden Mississippi Battery

 

Ab 31.3.1862 bildete Gibson's Brigade bei *Monterey / Tennessee die CS-Vorposten (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 116).

 

1865 war Gibson Senator (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 120)

 

 

 

Gibson, William H.:

US-Col; Regimentskommandeur 49th Ohio Infantry

 

 

Gifford, H. J.:

US-Pvt; 2nd Division 6th New York Corps.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gifford, H. J. Letter, 1864. Soldier in the 2nd Division 6th New York Corps. Letter written February 20, 1864, from division head­quarters at Brandy Station, Virginia, to Sarah L. (Lyra) Stillson of Corning, New York. Admits that he is an "infidel," and that there is no truth to the different religions of the world. (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms89-067).

 

 

Gilbert, Charles Champion:

US-BrigGen; 1822-1903; West Point 1846 (21/59); US-Berufsoffizier; Teilnahme am Mexikokrieg, an der Frontier; Assistant Profes­sor in West Point; Einsatz in den Indianerkriegen; seit 1855 US-Captain 1st US-Infantry; bei Kriegsbeginn Teilnahme an der Kämp­fen von Dug Springs / Missouri und am 2.8.1861 an der Schlacht von Wilson's Creek, dabei schwer verwundet; dann Acting I.G. Dept. of the Cumberland und der Army of the Ohio bis 11.3.1862; Teilnahme and er Schlacht von Shiloh am 7.4.1862; BrigGen 9.9.1862; er War Acting MajGen der Army of Kentucky vom 1.-27.9.1862, Kommandeur 10th Division I Corps Army of the Ohio vom 8.10.1862-5.11.1862 in Perryville und zeitweise III Corps Army of the Ohio (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 342). Im März 1863 war Gilbert Kommandeur der US-Truppen in Franklin / Tennessee (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 50). Sein Brevet zum BrigGen war zeitlich befristet bis 4.3.1863 und wurde vom US-Senat nicht verlängert (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 342). Hintergrund war massive Kritik an seinen Führungsqualitäten während der Schlacht von Perryville durch die Buell Commission. Gilbert unterlies als direkter Vorgesetzter Coburn's vor dem Battle von Thompson's Station am 5.3.1863 auf dessen Anfrage die erforderlichen Befehle zu erteilen und unterließ jede Unterstützung während des Battle von Thompson's Station (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 79). Ab 12.9.1863 wurde er Major der 19th US-Infantry; Gilbert blieb in der Army zuletzt als Col bis zu seiner Versetzung in den Ruhestand 1886 (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 342; Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 80; Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 174).

 

 

Gilbert, Henry C.:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 19th Regiment Michigan Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M545 Roll 15).

 

14.7.1818 Onongage County / New York State; 1841 zog er nach Michigan; Rechtsanwalt; 1850 Attorney der Michigan Southern Railroad; dann wurde er von Präsident Franklin Pierce zum Indian Agent der Northwest Territories ernannt; er war auch er­folgreicher Geschäftsmann; u.a. Eigentümer der Zeitung Sentinel in Coldwater, Eigner einer Sägemühle und einer Mahlmühle (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn’s Brigade, a.a.O., S. 9). 1862 Regimentskommandeur 19th Michigan Infantry, Coburn's Brigade. Gilbert kritisierte Coburn's Führung im Battle von Thompson's Station hart (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn’s Brigade, a.a.O., S. 78).

 

Photo:

- Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 16

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Anderson, William: They Died to Make Men Free: A History of the 19th Michigan Infantry in the Civil War (Morningside, Dayton); Revised Edition, 397 pp, maps, photos. The author used, located and examined 1,641 letters and 14 diaries and journals written by members of the regiment to produce this work.

- Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 9, 10, 39, 52, 62, 63, 65, 72, 75, 76, 78, 90, 108, 123, 129, 147, 148, 167, 172, 174

 

 

Gilger, John A.:

US-Pvt; Co. K, 46th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 43; vgl. auch Coco: Civil War Infantry­man, a.a.O., S. vi; Anm.: bei Bates: Pennsylvania Volunteers, a.a.O., vol. I im Rahmen der 46th Pennsylvania Infantry nicht genannt).

 

Gilger entlistes22.2.1862 in Harrisburg and was present during the engagements at Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Resaca, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain, Kolb's Farm, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and the siege of Atlanta. Sometimes after his second enlistment in 2.2.1864, Gilger stamped his name, company, and regiment into the metal barrel of his Springfield rifle musket (vgl. Coco: Civil War Infantryman, a.a.O., S. vi). Upon discharge from the army on 146.7.1865, Gilger bought the rifle for $ 6.00 and took it home. Diese Waffe blieb in Gilger's Familie erhalten (vgl. Coco: Civil War Infantry­man, a.a.O., S. vi).

 

 

Gilham, William:

CS-Col; West Point 1840 (5/42; vgl. Tanner, Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 65: ein Platz vor Sherman); Teilnahme am Mexiko­krieg; später Professor am l in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 65). Regimentskommandeur der 21st Virginia Infantry ab Sommer 1861 (vgl. Worsham, John H.: "One of Jackson's Foot Cavalry; a.a.O., S. 22); eingesetzt während der West Virginia Campaign 1861 unter Lo­ring bei Valley Mountain an der Huttonsville-Huntersville Road (Karte bei Freeman: R. E. Lee, vol. 1, S. 549; vgl. Freeman, a.a.O., S. 550-51). Brigadekommandeur der Brigade Gilham (21st, 42nd, 48th Virginia) in Loring's Army of the Northwest im Spätjahr 1861 (Worsham, a.a.O., S. 42; Tanner, Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 65).

 

Teilnahme an Stonewall Jackson Expedition nach Bath and Romney im Januar 1862 im Rahmen von Loring's Army of the Northwest (vgl. Tanner, Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 64, 65).

 

Stonewall Jackson beantragte bei Gen Joseph E. *Johnston die Durchführung eines Court Martial gegen Gilham im Februar 1862, wegen mangelndem Vorgehen bei Sir John's Run am 4.1.1862 und gegen den Kommandeur der Army of the Northwest, BrigGen *Loring (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 84). Hintergrund waren die Vorgänge, die zur Räumung von Romney führten (vgl. Anm. zu *Loring und *Army of the Northwest). Präsident Davis lehnte die Durchführung eines Kriegsgerichtsverfahrens ab, veranlaßte aber die Auflö­sung der Army of the Northwest, deren Einheiten teils nach Zentral-Virginia, teils nach Tennessee verlegt wurden. Gilham kehrte ans Virginia Military Institute zurück (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 85). Sein Nachfolger wurde Col Jesse *Burks (vgl. Tanner, a.a.O., S. 101).

 

 

Gilkyson, Stephen R.:

US-LtCol; 6th New Jersey Infantry; im Sommer 1863 führte die 6th New Jersey Infantry während der Abwesenheit des Regiments­kommandeurs Col George C. *Burling, der die Führung der Brigade Burling zeitweise anstelle des Brigadekommandeurs übernom­men hatte. Das Regiment gehörte im Sommer 1863 zur 3rd Brigade Col George C. Burling 2nd Division BrigGen Andrew A. Hum­phreys III Army Corps David E. Birney; Teilnahme am Battle von Gettysburg; die Regimenter von Burling's Brigade wurden an ver­schiedenen Stellen der Front, außerhalb des Brigadeverbandes als Verstärkung eingesetzt (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 192, 242).

 

 

Gill, C. R.:

US-Col; Regimentskommandeur 29th Wisconsin Infantry, 1st Brigade George F. McGinnis, 12th Division Alvin P. Hovey, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Campaign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 403). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 403).

 

 

Gill, John:

CS-Sgt; Baltimore, Maryland

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gill, John: Courier for Lee and Jackson: Memoirs of Sergeant John Gill, 1861-1865 (White Mane); 94 pp. Recently rediscovered memoirs of John Gill, of Baltimore, Maryland; Biblio; Index

 

 

Gill, Samuel:

-++++ (vgl. McClellan: Own Story, a.a.O., S. 48)

 

 

Gillet, James:

US-Lieutenant; brigade commisionar officer in Cooper's Brigade (vgl. Stackpole: From Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 33) in Sigel's Corps in Pope's Army of Virginia im Juli 1862. Gillet berichtet seiner Mutter in einem in Warrenton, Va. am 31.7.1862 geschriebenen Brief über die Folgen von Pope's Befehlen, an die Army of Virginia, sich aus dem Land durch Requisitionen selbst zu versorgen, und den hieraus resultierenden Plünderungen (vgl. Stackpole: From Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 25).

 

 

Gillespie, Samuel L.:

US-+++; Co A 1st Ohio Cavalry (vgl. Longacre: The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 301n4)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gillespie, Samuel L.: A History of Company A, First Ohio Cavalry, 1861-1865 (Washington Court House, Ohio, 1898)

 

 

Gillet, Orville:

US-Sgt; Co B, 3rd Michigan Cavalry; enlisted in the Union army in October 1861 at Grand Rapids, Michigan. He left with his re­giment for St. Louis on November 28 and was stationed at Benton Barracks until February 1862, when the Third Michigan was cal­led into duty to assist in the siege of New Madrid, Missouri, and the capture of Island Number 10. Orville next accompanied his re­giment during the advance to Corinth, Mississippi, in early May. Sergeant Gillet stayed with the Third Michigan until October 1864, when he resigned to accept a commission as a second lieutenant of Company G, Third Arkansas Cavalry (Union).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gillet, Orville: Diary, 1861-1865; 1 roll. The collection consists of three diaries: October 11, 1861, to May 9, 1862; January 1 to December 31, 1864; and January 1 to October 25, 1865. Sergeant Orville Gillet's entries are extremely terse, providing little descrip­tion of combat activities. However, the volumes also contain photographs of soldiers from the Third Michigan, steamboats operating in Arkansas, and buildings at DuVall's Bluff (Prairie County) and Little Rock (Pulaski County). Gillet also drew two maps of the New Madrid area and kept notations of some of his expenses in 1862. Typed transcripts of the last two diaries are included. Gillet, Company B, Third Michigan Cavalry, enlisted in the Union army in October 1861 at Grand Rapids, Michigan. He left with his re­giment for St. Louis on November 28 and was stationed at Benton Barracks until February 1862, when the Third Michigan was cal­led into duty to assist in the siege of New Madrid, Missouri, and the capture of Island Number 10. Orville next accompanied his re­giment during the advance to Corinth, Mississippi, in early May. Sergeant Gillet stayed with the Third Michigan until October 1864, when he resigned to accept a commission as a second lieutenant of Company G, Third Arkansas Cavalry (Union). While in Arkansas, Gillet was stationed at Little Rock, Lewisburg, Cadron (Conway County), Brownsville (Prairie County), and DuVall's Bluff. Micro­film copy of originals held by the Arkansas History Commission (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Gilmer, Jeremy Francis:

CS-MajGen; 1818-93; aus North Carolina; West Point 1839 (4/31); Engineers; er war Lehrer für Engineering in West Point; served in the Mexican War, in harbor fortification construction, was Chief Engineer of the Department of the West and participated in river and harbor work in the South before resigning 29.6.1861 as Captain (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 343-344).

 

Commissioned LtCol CSA Engrs in September 1861 und Johnston's Chief Engr. in Department No. 2 (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344), bzw. 1861 war Major Gilmer der Chief Engineer in Johnston's Army of Tennessee (vgl. Connelly: Army of the Heart­land, a.a.O., S. 4). Fighting at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh (wounded) (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344).

 

4.8.1862 Gilmer he was named Chief Engr. of the Department of Northern VA (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344). Lee ließ zur Verstärkung der Verteidigung Richmond's im Sommer 1862 bei *Drewry's Bluff durch LtCol. Jeremy F. Gilmer im Sommer 1862 schwere Befestigungen errichten (vgl. Freeman: Lee, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 259; OR 11 [3] S. 639, 646, 658, 664; OR 12 [2] S. 176; OR 51 [2] S. 589, 592, 600; Lee's Dispatches, a.a.O., S. 40).

 

On 4.10.1862 he was named Chief of the Engr. Bureau of the CSA (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344). Im Frühjahr 1863 war Col Gilmer Chief of the Engineer Bureau. Bei ihm forderte Gen Lee am 11.4.1863 einen „pontoon bridge train of 550-foot-span, complete with rigging“ an, to sent to Orange Court House. „Keep this matter as quiet as possible“, Lee coutioned Gilmer. On 30.5.1863 the War Department in Washington learned of this train through the report of an informant in Winchester/VA (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 8; vgl. OR XXV, Pt. 2, pp. 570, 713-14, 715).

 

Never a BrigGen, he was promoted MajGen from Col on 25.8.1863. At this time he was also named second-in-command of the De­partment of SC, Ga, and Fla and served during the bombardment of Charleston. After fortifying Atlanta he returned to the Dept. Of Northern VA. After the war he was in railroading and engineering (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344).

 

°° mit Louisa Frederika Alexander; Schwager von CS-B­rigGen Edward Porter Alexander (vgl. Alexander: Fighting for the Confe­deracy, a.a.O., S. 4, 15 und Anm. 4 S. 556).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gilmer, Jeremy: Papers; Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina

 

 

Gilmer, John Adams:

US-Congressman; 4.11.1805 Greensboro, Guilford County/NC - † 15.4.1868; S. v. Captain Robert Shaw and Anna Forbes Gilmer; brother to Jeremy Francis Gilmer (vgl. Wakelyn: Biographical Dictionary of the confederacy, a.a.O., S. 203).

 

After attending grammar school and the academy in Greensboro, he taught at the Mount Vernon Grammar School in South Carolina. He was also admitted to the Greensboro bar in 1832 and had a long and active practice. Gilmer served as a county solicitor during the late 1830s and as a state senator from Guilford County 1846-1856. In 1856 he was unsuccessful as the Whig candidate for governor. Gilmer was elected as a member of the American Party to the U.S. House 1857-1861. He opposed the *Lecompton Constitution for Kansas (Anm.: Das Repräsentantenhaus setzte sich aus 109 Republikanern, 101 Demokraten,13 als "Anti-Lecomp­ton" bezeichnete Demokraten, 26 Mitgliedern der *American Party und 1 Whig zusammen. Keine der Parteien hatte die Mehrheit [vgl. Catton: The Coming Fury, a.a.O., S. 10; vgl. Chadwick, French Ensor: Causes of the Civil War, 1859-1861, S. 90]. Bei den "Anti-Le­compton-Democrats" handelte es sich um 13 Abgeordnete aus den Nordstaaten, die Senator Douglas bei seiner Revolte gegen Präsi­dent Buchanan gefolgt waren). Gilmer was offered the post of secretary of the interior in President Lincoln's cabinet, but refused (vgl. Wakelyn: Biographical Dictionary of the confederacy, a.a.O., S. 203).

 

Gilmer was an outstanding Southern unionist, and he sent 100.000 copies of his anti-secession speeches to North Carolina before being elected to the state secession convention as a conservative. After Lincoln called for troops, however, Gilmer supported secession. He served in various local capacities during the early years of the war. In 1864, he was elected to the Second Confederate Congress and became chairman of the Committee on Elections and a member of the Ways and Means Committee. In Congress he protested government impressment practices and supported increasing taxes but generally voted against Davis administration measures. He made peace overtures to Washington late in 1864. After the war, he supported President Johnson and served as a delegate to the Union national convention od conservatives at Philadelphia in 1866. He also returned to his law practice in Guilford County (vgl. Wakelyn: Biographical Dictionary of the confederacy, a.a.O., S. 203).

 

∞ 1832 with Julianna Paisley (vgl. Wakelyn: Biographical Dictionary of the confederacy, a.a.O., S. 203).

 

 

Gilmor, Harry:

CS-Col; auch Gilmore; aus Maryland; schloß sich bei Kriegsausbruch als Private in der Stonewall Brigade, dann in Ashby's CS-Ca­valry im Shenandoah Tal (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 55, 164); zeitweise Captain Co. F, 12th Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 21). An Weihnachten 1861 war Gilmore Sergeant, 3 Monate später war er bereits Captain (vgl. Tanner, Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 63, 164). One of the Confederacy’s most famous cavalry commanders. Gil­more, a Marylander, served as a partisan in the Shenandoah and served under Lee in the Army of Northern Virginia. Kommandeur 1st Mary­land Battalion.

 

1863 gehörte die Einheit zu Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Brigade; Stuart's Cavalry Division. Sein Stellvertreter war Maj Ridgely Brown (vgl. Longacre, The Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 17).

 

Gilmore served with Turner Ashby, participated at Gettysburg and scouted in the Shenandoah; with Pelham when he was mortally wounded.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Ackinclose, Timothy: Sabres and Pistols: The Civil War Career of Colonel Harry Gilmore

- Gilmore, Harry: Four Years in the Saddle (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1866)

- Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 55, 63, 111, 112, 164, 203, 326, 329, 445

 

 

Gilpin, Samuel J. B. V.:

US-Commissary Sergeant; zunächst Pvt, dann Corporal; Co. E, 3rd Regiment Indiana Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 27; vgl. auch Priest: Battle of South Mountain, a.a.O., S. 8 [Pvt, , Co. E, 3rd Ind. Cav.], 8, 12, 32, 41, 52, 58, 78, 100).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gilpin, Samuel J. B. V.: Diary; E. N. Gilpin Collection, Manuscript Division, Library of the Congress

 

 

Gilpin, Thomas C.:

US-Captain; Co. E, 3rd Regiment Iowa Cavalry; Gilpin trat als First Sergeant in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M541 Roll 10).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Gilpin, Thomas C.: History of the 3rd Iowa Volunteer Cavalry, From August 1861, to September, 1865 (Winterset / Iowa, 1908)

 

 

Gilsa, Charles von:

US-+++, Co. M, 3rd Regiment US-Cavalry (Regular Army) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M233 Roll 30).

 

 

Giltner, Benjamin:

CS-Pvt; Co. K, 11th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5).

 

 

Giltner, David:

CS-Pvt; Co. F, 7th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5); s. auch Co. F, 11th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5)

 

 

Giltner, Henry L.:

CS-Col; Co. F, 4th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5); zunächst Captain Co. F (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5); Giltner war an der Aufstellung der 4th Kentucky Cavalry beteiligt (vgl. Mosgrove: Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie, a.a.O., S. 16).

 

1864 Regimentskommandeur der 4th Kentucky Cavalry. Er nahm mit seiner Einheit an Morgan's Angriff gegen die US-Truppen bei Bulls Gap / East-Tennessee Ende August - Anfang September 1864 teil (vgl. Horwitz, Longest Raid, a.a.O., S. 369).

 

 

Gimber, Frederick L.:

US-Captain; während Sherman's Atlanta Campaign 1864 war Captain Gimber Regimentsführer der 109th Pennsylvania Infantry

 

 

Girardey, I. P.:

CS-Captain; 1862 und im Battle of Shiloh Batteriechef von Girardey's Georgia Battery. die Battery gehörte im Battle of Shiloh zur 3rd Brigade BrigGen John K. Jackson 2nd Division BrigGen Jones M. Withers II. Army Corps MajGen Braxton Bragg in A. S. John­ston's Army of the Mississippi (vgl. Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh, B & L, a.a.O., I, S. 539). Am 6.4.1862 gegen 9:40 war Gi­rardey's Battery auf einer Anhöhe bei Shake-a-Rag-Churchen Stuart's US-Brigade (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 198-99 mit Karte S. 194).

 

 

Girichton, Lewis:

US-Pvt (?); Co. I, 1st US-Sharpshooters (Berdan’s Sharpshooters); † kia 1./3.7.1863 Gettysburg (vgl. Stevens: Berdan’s US-Sharpshooters in the Army of the Potomac, a.a.O., S. 344; Anm.: bei National Park Soldiers nicht genannt).

 

 

Gisse, Adam:

US-2ndLt; aus Delaware County / Indiana; in der vorkriegszeit war Gisse Carpenter und lebte in Muncy / Indiana, 60 mi südlich von Indianapolis (vgl. Venner: 19th Indiana Infantry, a.a.O., S. 139n26); Co A 19th Indiana Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Gettysburg am 1.7.1863 im Gefecht am Willoughby Run (vgl. Venner: 19th Indiana Infantry, a.a.O., S. 50). Gisse schied im August 1864 nach Ablauf seiner Dienstzeit aus (vgl. Gaff: On many a Bloody Field, a.a.O., S. 280).

 

 

Gist, States Rights:

CS-+++Gen; 1.9.1861-30.11.1864; gefallen im Battle of Franklin; General Gist was named "States Rights" by his father, studied at South Carolina College and Harvard. He went on to become a leading General and died in a gallant charge at Franklin, Tennessee

 

Photos:

Buck, Irving A. (Captain C.S.A.): "Cleburne and his Command", a.a.O., S. 18

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Cisco, Walter Brian: States Rights Gist - A South Carolina General of the Civil War (White Mane Publishing, 1991); 198 pp

 

 

Gist, William H.:

CS-Governor von South Carolina; Gist war zeitlebens an der vordersten Front der State Rights und der Southern Rights (vgl. Davis, A Government of Our Own, a.a.O., S. 7). Im October 1860 Gist addressed fellow governors to ask what they felt should be the response to a Lincoln victory, and clearly hinted that he did not want to be the first to secede (vgl. Davis, A Government of Our Own, a.a.O., S. 7).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Gist, William H.: Papers. South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia

 

 

Given, John G.:

US-Pvt; Co. C&I, 124th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 33; vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the civil War, a.a.O., S. 6-7).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Given, John G. (Pvt, 124th Illinois Infantry): Papers (Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield / Illinois)

 

 

Given, John S.:

US-State Senator aus +++; Given setzte sich mit anderen Republikanern bei Lincoln für die Wiedereinsetzung von James L. *Ridge­ly ein (vgl. Basler: Collected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 75: Memorandum Lincoln's vom 17.12.1863).

 

 

Givler, David:

US-Musician & Pvt; Co. C, 7th Regiment Illinois Infantry; Given trat als Musician in das Regiment ein; später Pvt (vgl. National Park Soldier M539 Roll 33). Regimentstrompeter 7th Illinois Infantry (vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 16 und Literaturver­zeichnis, a.a.O., S. 371).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Givler, David: "Intimate Glimpses of Army Life During the Civil War." Typed Transcript, Illinois State Historical Library, Spring­field / Illinois

 

 

Gladden, Adley H.:

CS-BrigGen; ? - 1862; er stammte aus South Carolina; im Mexikokrieg war Gladden Col der Palmetto South Carolina Infantry; spä­ter prominenter Kaufmann in New Orleans / Louisiana (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 154); Col 1st Louisiana Infantry; er stellte vor *Pensacola im April 1861 aus Louisiana Truppen die 1st Louisiana Infantry auf (vgl. Confederate Military History, a.a.O., vol. X, S. 30 Anm.). BrigGen 30.9.1861; die Brigade Gladden stand im Herbst 1861 vor Pensacola; im Januar 1862 nach Mobile verlegt. Nach dem Fall von Fort Donelsen wurden die CS-Truppen zwischen Mississippi und Tennessee River von Beauregard neu gegliedert in1st Corps 2nd Grand Division, wobei Gladden zwei Brigaden führte (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 64). Da ein Raid gegen die kriegs­wichtige Mobile & Ohio Railroad im Raum Corinth / Iuka / Nord-Mississippi befürchtet wurde (vgl. Karte bei Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 25), erhielt Gladden am 8./9.3.1862 den Befehl ein Detachment bestehend aus 2 Regimentern Infantrie, einer Artillery-Battery und 3 Companies des 2nd Mississippi Cavalry Batallion (*Gordon's Cavalry Batallion) nach Bethel Station / Süd-Tennessee zu verlegen (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 71).

 

Gladden's Brigade bestand im Frühjahr 1862 und im Battle of Shiloh aus folgenden Regimentern:

- 21st Alabama Infantry

- 22nd Alabama Infantry

- 25th Alabama Infantry

- 26th Alabama Infantry

- 1st Louisiana Infantry

- Robertson's Florida Battery

 

Gladden's Brigade griff am 6.4.1862 in Shiloh gegen 8:00 Miller's Brigade an (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 154 mit Karte S. 146).

 

Gladden wurde im Battle of Shiloh am 6.4.1862 schwer verwundet und starb am selben Tag (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 345; Daniel: Shi­loh, a.a.O., S. 154).

 

 

Glass, E. Jones:

CS-Captain; Co B 4th Alabama Infantry; resigned 10.3. 1863

 

 

Glazier, Nelson Newton:

US-2nd Lieutenant; Co. G, 11th Vermont Infantry Regiment; 12.12.1838 Stratton, Windham county, Vermont - † Herbst 1922 Ne­brasca; Son of John Newton and Phebe Cass (Bourn) Glazier, was born December 12th, 1838 at Stratton, Windham county, Ver­mont. His education was acquired in the common schools, Leland Seminary, Amherst college, 1858-61; and at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, 1864-66. Here in 1866, at the time of his graduation, he received the degree of A. B. and from there in 1869 the degree of A. M. Three years also, 1866-69, were passed in study at the Newton Theological institution, Newton Center, Mass. In 1865, while a senior at Brown University, he was elected representative to the Vermont legislature from his native town and served on the committee on education. This honor was conferred on him in 1867, when a student at Newton Theological institution, and he was made a member of the committee on elections (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).


Mr. Glazier, August 11th, 1862, enlisted in Co. G, 11th regiment, Vermont volunteers, afterwards the First Artillery, Eleventh Ver­mont Volunteers, and served as private, corporal, and for a time acting ordnance sergeant at Fort Slocum, and for months on recrui­ting service in Vermont. He was made Second Lieutenant of Company A, November 2, 1863, and became first lieutenant of the same company January 21, 1864. He lost his left arm at Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864, and was honorably discharged September 3, 1864, on account of wounds received in action (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).


He died at Ashland, Nebraska in the fall of 1922. Auf seinem Grabstein im Willow Creek Cemetery, Prague Saunders County, Ne­braska wird er als „Reverend“ bezeichnet (vgl. Photo bei http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Photo:

Lieutenant N. N. Glazier ( http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Glazier, Nelson Newton: Letters 18621864; in: http://vermontcivilwar.org/units/11/nng7.php

 

 

Glazier, Willard W.:

US-Captain; Co. E, 2nd Regiment New York Cavalry; Glazier trat als Pvt in das Regiment ein, später Lieutenant (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 13).

 

22.8.1841 Fowler, St. Lawrence County / New York - † 26.4.1905, beerd. Albany Rural Cemetery, Menands, Albany County / New York; Sohn von Ward Glazier und Mahitable Bolton Glazier (1815-1890).

 

Born in upstate New York and spent his boyhood on a farm. Was educated principally at the state normal-school at Albany. 
He taught in Schodack, New York, in 1859-1860. In 1861 enlisted in the 2d New York, or 'Harris cavalry' regiment. He had reached the rank of lieutenant, when he was taken prisoner in a cavalry skirmish near Buckland Mills, Virginia, on 18 October, 1863, and sent to Libby prison. He was afterward transferred to Georgia, to Charleston, and then to Columbia, South Carolina, whence he made his escape, but was recaptured near Springfield, Georgia. He escaped again from Sylvania, Georgia, 19 December 1864, and returned home, his term of service having expired. On 25 February, 1864, he entered the army again as 1st lieutenant in the 26th New York ca­valry, and served till the end of the war. In 1867 he was granted the rank of Brevet Captain for 'meritorious service'.
After the war devoted himself to travel and exploration and became a well known author. He married Harriet Ayers of Cincinnati in 1868. In 1876 he went from Boston to San Francisco on horseback, and was captured by hostile Indians near Skull Rocks, Wyoming territory, but made his escape. In 1881 he made a canoe voyage of 3,000 miles, from the head-waters to the mouth of the Mississippi, and claimed to be the discoverer of a small lake (later named Lake Glazier)south of Lake Itasca, which he believed was the true sour­ce of the Mississippi. He organized and was made Colonel of a provisional regiment of Illinois Infantry during the Span-Am War.
In 1902-03 he explored uncharted territory on the Labrador Peninsula and discovered a river which now bears his name.
He died in 1905 at 64 years old.

 

Photo:

Captain Willard W. Glazier (Photo www.findagrave.com)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Glazier, Willard (2nd New York Cavalry): Three Years in the Federal Cavalry (New York 1872)

- Glazier, Willard: The Capture, the Prison Pen, and the Escape. History of Prison Life in the South (Hartford/Conn., H. E. Goodwin Publisher, 1869)

- Glazier, Willard: Battles for the Union: Comprising Descriptions of the Most Stubbornly Contested Battles in the War of the Great Rebellion (Cincinnati/Ohio, Dustin. Gilman & Co., 1875)

- Glazier, Willard: Heroes of Three Wars: Comprising a Series of the Most Distinguished Soldiers of the War of the Revolution, the War with Mexico, and the War for the Union (Hubbard Brothers, 1884)

- Starr, Stephen Z.: Union Cavalry, a.a.O., vol. I, S. 89, 194, 244, 330 n, 340, 394 Brandy Station, 449 n

 

 

Glendening, Abram:

US-Pvt; 5th Company Ohio Sharpshooters. He died in May 1864 from a gunshot wound at Hallowell's Landing, Alabama.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Glendening, Abram: Lettes, 1863-67. Six letters from or about Glendening and his brothers, all soldiers in the Union Army. Glende­ning and his family were from Mill Creek, West Virginia, but he and his brothers emigrated to Ohio when they refused to fight for the Confederacy. Glendening enlisted in the 5th Ohio Sharpshooters in December 1863. He died in May 1864 from a gunshot wound at Hallowell's Landing, Alabama. Letters by Glendening focus on his reasons for not fighting with the Confederacy, and after his death the letters by friends and family focus on his death and the location of his grave. Transcripts available. (Virginia Tech, Univ. Librari­es, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms91-067).

 

 

Glenn, James W.:

CS-Captain und CS-Spion; Onkel von Belle *Boyd (vgl. Markle: Spies, a.a.O., S. 155).

 

 

Glenn, William H.:

CS-Pvt; Co. B, 26th North Carolina Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers 230 Roll 15; vgl. Hess: Lee's Tar Heels, a.a.O., S. 9, 81).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

Glenn Papers, Duke University, Special Collections Library, Durham/NC

 

 

Glover, Benjamin Robert:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 6th Regiment Florida Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M225 Roll 3); Soldat in Finley's Florida Brigade (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 31).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Glover, Benjamin Robert: Letters (Alabama Department of Archives and History, Montgomery / Alabama)

 

 

Glover, John:

US-Pvt; Co. E, 58th Regiment Pennsylvania infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 44).

 

 

Gober, Daniel:

CS-Major; Regimentskommandeur 16th Louisiana Infantry. Das Regiment gehörte im Battle of Shiloh unter Führung von Major Da­niel Gober zur 3rd Brigade Col Preston Pond 1st Division BrigGen Daniel Ruggles II. Army Corps Braxton Bragg in Johnston's Army of the Mississippi (vgl. Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh; in: B&L I 539)

 

 

Godfrey, Thomas C.:

US-Captain; 5th New Jersey Infantry (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 448)

 

 

Golden, George:

US-Pvt; Co. B, 1st Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 16); Res. East Boston; 35; cooper; enl. Aug. 4, 1862; must. Aug. 13, 1862; † July 13, 1863, of wounds reed, at Gettysburg, Penna., July 2, 1863 (vgl. Massachusetts Adju­tant General: Massa­chusetts Sol­diers , a.a.O., vol 1, p. 12).

 

 

Goldsborough, Louis Malesherbes:

US-Commander; seit Sept 1861 Commander der Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Im Februar 1862 führte er eine Flotte zur Unterstüt­zung von Burnside's Expedition gegen North Carolina. Kritik an seiner Inaktivität während der Peninsular Campaign führte zu seiner Entlassung.

 

 

Godwin, D. George:

CS-Assistant Surgeon; keine Einheit, General and Staff Officers, Non-Regimental Enlisted Men, CSA (vgl. National Park Soldiers M818 Roll 9).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Godwin, D. G.: Papers; Atlanta Historical Society, Atlanta/Georgia

- Godwin, D. G.: Letters. TNSLA – Tennessee State Library Archives, Civil War Collection - Confederates

 

 

Goldsbery, Andrew E.:

US-Corporal; Co. E, 127th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 33).

 

Pvt Goldsbery received on 9.8.1894 the Medal of Honor für seinen Einsatz bei Vicksburg for „Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party" (vgl. National Park, Medal of Honor Recipients, George D. Goldsbery).

 

 

Goldsborough, William W.:

CS-Major; zunächst Pvt, dann Captain Co. A, 1st Regiment Maryland Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M379 Roll 1); later Captain Co. G, 2nd Battalion Maryland Infantry, befördert zum Major Co. F&S, 2nd Battalion Maryland Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M379 Roll 1).

 

1st Maryland Battalion Infantry (auch als 2nd Battalion Maryland Infantry bezeichnet) / Brigade George H. Steuart / Division Maj­Gen Edward Johnson / II. Army Corps Ewell / Lee's Army of Northern Virginia (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 460); am 28.6.1863 eingesetzt in Ewell's Army Corps am Vor­abend der Schlacht von Gettysburg (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 21).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Goldsborough, W. W.: The Maryland Line in the Confederate Army, 1861-1865 (Baltimore: Guggenheimer, Weil & Co., 1900. Re­printed 1983 by Butternut Press) (Archiv Ref, ameridownload: Maryland Line [CS])

 

 

Goldsby, Thomas J.:

CS-LtCol; 4th Alabama Infantry; zunächst Captain Co A 4th Alabama Infantry; dann LtCol 4th Alabama Infantry verwundet im Batt­le von 1st Cold Harbor; resigned

 

 

Gollermann, William:

US-Lt; 1863 Lt Co F 6th Wisconsin Infantry (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 133).

 

 

Good, John J.:

CS-Captain; Batteriechef von Good's Texas Battery. Good's Battery umfaßte im Frühjahr 1862 zwei 12-pounder Guns und zwei 12-pounder Howitzers (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335). Im Frühjahr 1862 während der Pea Ridge Campaign gehörte Good's Texas Battery zu BrigGen James M. *McIntosh's Cavalry Brigade in Benjamin *McCulloch's Division, Van Dorn's Army of the West (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335). Teilnahme am Battle of Pea Ridge am 7.3.1862 (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 97; Fitzhugh, a.a.O., S. 162-63).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Fitzhugh, Lester N. (ed.): Cannon Smoke: The Letters of Captain John J. Good, Good-Douglas Texas Battery, CSA (Hillsboro, Te­xas, 1971)

 

 

Goode, Enos J.:

CS-Col; 1861 Regimentskommandeur 7th Mississippi Infantry (vgl. Sifakis, Compendium of the Confederate Armies, Mississippi, a.a.O., Nr. 142).

 

 

Goodrich, Anson:

CS-Pvt (err); Surry Light Artillery of Richmond; Goodrich schloß sich im Frühjahr 1862 der Einheit an; er starb im Hospital in Pe­tersburg im Sommer 1862 (vgl. Jones: Under the Stars and Bars: Surry Light Artillery of Virginia, a.a.O., S. 47-48).

 

 

Goodrich, William:

US-Pvt, Co. E, 50th New York Engineers; 1839 - † 10.7.1862 Harrison Landing/VA; Enlisted age 22 in Aug 1861 at Campbellton, NY; died of disease at Harrisons Landing, VA. (NYS Adj Gen Report) (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Goodrich, William:

US-Captain, Co. C, 1st Vermont Heavy Artillery Regiment (zuvor 11th Vermont Infantry Regiment) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M557 Roll 6). Lt Goodrich wird mehrfach in den Briefen von Aldace Freeman *Walker genannt (vgl. Ledoux: „Quite ready to be sent somewhere“. The Civil War Letters of Aldace Free­man Walker, a.a.O., u.a. S. 26).

 

 

Goodrich, William H.:

US-Pvt, Co. H, 44th New York Infantry Regiment; 1840 - † 1924 (vgl. Angabe auf seinem Grabstein auf dem Highland Cemetery, Jordanville/NY; vgl. www.findagrave.com).

 

 

Goodwin, John M.:

US-2ndLt; Co. I, 6th Regiment Wisconsin Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M559 Roll 11); Goodwin stammte aus Plymouth/ Wisconsin (vgl. Herdegen/Beaudot: Bloody Railroad Cut, a.a.O., S. 45).

 

 

Goodwin, R. D.:

US-Col der New York Volunteers (umstritten): nach der Aussage von Capt. *Ruggles (vom 1.7.1861-28.6.1862 Captain und Asst. Adj. Gen der regulären Armee und in dieser Funktion für die Erfassung aller Volunteer Forces der Armee zuständig) war Goodwin nie Col. der US-Volunteers, sondern bot der Army ein von ihm persönlich aufgestelltes Volunteer Regiment zum Dienst in der Armee an (OR Ser. I vol. 12/1 S. 72); in einem Brief des War Department vom 22.7.1861 wird Goodwin dagegen als "Col. ... Commanding President's Life Guard" bezeichnet (vgl. OR Ser I vol. 12/1 S. 69); Goodwin dürfte m.E. von seinem Regiment zum Col. gewählt worden sein und hatte, da er nicht in den US-Dienst übernommen wurde, wohl den Rang als Col. der New York Militia.

 

Goodwin beschuldigte in einem Leserbrief vom 24.9.1862, erschienen im "Sunday Mercury" vom 28.9.1862 (vgl. OR Ser. I vol 12/1 S. 44, 64), Gen. McDowell des Verrats, der ungenügenden Versorgung der Truppen und der Trunkenheit im Dienst (abgedruckt bei OR Ser. I vol 12/1 S. 44); Goodwin belastete Gen McDowell in seiner Zeugenaussage im McDowell Court of Inquiry am 3.12.1862 erneut der Trunkenheit im Dienst und des Verrats (OR Ser I vol. 12/1 S. 64 ff.).

 

 

Goodyear, Robert:

US-Sergeant, Co. B., 27th Regiment Connecticut Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M535 Roll 6; bei Sears: Chancellorsville, a.a.O., S. 16 dagegen als Pvt genannt).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Goodyear, Robert ( Sergeant, 27th Regiment Connecticut Infantry): Robert Goodyear Letters, U.S. Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks / Pennsylvania

 

 

Gordon, George Henry:

US-MajGen; 1823-86; aus Massachusetts; West Point 1846 (43/59); im Mexikokrieg zweimal verwundet und wegen Tapferkeit im Battle von Cerro Alto befördert; 1853 freiwillig aus der US-Army ausgeschieden; Jurastudium in Harvard; Rechtsanwalt seit 1857; im Bürgerkrieg: 24.5.1861 Col 2nd Massachusetts Infantry; 1862 Brigadekommandeur 3rd Brigade 1st Division 2nd Army Corps Po­pe's Army of Virginia, Battle of Cedar Mountain (vgl. Battles and Leaders, a.a.O., vol. II., S. 496). Pope lobt Gordon posthum wegen seiner Tapferkeit in der Schlacht von Cedar Mountain (vgl. Cozzens / Girardi: The Military Memoirs of Gen. John Pope, a.a.O., S. 143).

 

Gordon's Report an Gen. Pope (OR 12 vol. 2, 807-8) erschien nur wenige Tage später in den Zeitungen des Nordens. Da der Report militärische Geheimnisse über den Pope's Army enthielt, die für den Süden angeblich bedeutsam waren (m.E. ist Gordon's Report eher bedeutungslos und enthält eine belanglose Schilderung des Gefechts), und als Veranlasser der Veröffentlichung Gen. Gordon verantwortlich gemacht wurde, ließ Gen. Pope diesen unter Arrest stellen und veranlaßte eine Untersuchung (vgl. Cozzens / Girardi: The Military Memoirs of Gen. John Pope, a.a.O., S. 144).

 

Gordon veröffentlichte in der Nachkriegszeit zahlreiche Artikel über die Kriegszeit. Sein Bericht über die 2nd Bull Run Campaign, erschienen erstmals 1880 unter dem Titel "History of the Campaign of the Army of Virginia" Boston, 1889), war kritisch gegenüber Gen. Pope's Generalship (vgl. Cozzens / Girardi: The Military Memoirs of Gen. John Pope, a.a.O., S. 272 Anm. 1; ebd. S. 144)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Cozzens / Girardi: The Military Memoirs of Gen. John Pope, a.a.O., S. 143 ff.

- **Gordon, George Henry: "History of the Campaign of the Army of Virginia" (Boston, 1889)

- **Gordon, George Henry: Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain in the War of the Great Rebellion, 1861-61 (Boston, 1883)

- **Gordon, George H: Battle of Cedar Mountain, OR 12 (2), 807-8

- Warner: Generals in Blue, a.a.O., S. 177-178

 

 

Gordon, James:

CS-Col; aus Mississippi; Gordon's Cavalry Batallion; durch dessen Vergrößerung wurde im Sommer 1862 das 2nd Mississippi Ca­valry Regiment gebildet wurde; Col 2nd Mississippi Cavalry (vgl. Sifakis: Compendium of the Confederate Armies, vol. Mississippi, a.a.O., S. 37); eingesetzt im Rahmen von Frank C. *Armstrong's Cavalry / Brigade in William H. 'Red' Jackson's 2nd Cavalry Divisi­on / Earl Van Dorn's First Confederate Cavalry Corps (vgl. Sifakis, a.a.O., S. 37); im Frühjahr 1863 Teilnahme in Tennessee gegen den Vorstoß der US-Truppen von Nashville nach Süden. Gefecht am 5.3.1863 gegen Coburn's Brigade bei Thompson's Station (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 87). Gordon, dessen Regiment die bei Thompson's Station in Kriegsgefangen­schaft ge­raten US-Truppen nach Tullahoma eskortierte, wurde von diesen für sein menschliches Verhalten gegenüber den Gefange­nen sehr ge­lobt (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 90).

 

 

Gordon, James B.:

CS-BrigGen; 1822-64; aus North Carolina. Graduiert vom Emory and Henry College in Virginia; Merchant; State Legislator. Protégé of JEB Stuart and cousin of John B. Gordon, James was a landowner, politician and businessman who joined the war, formed an in­fantry company and joined the Tarheel Cavalry. He led two regiments, two brigades and a division before he died just a week after Stuart. One of the greatest cavalrymen from North Carolina.

 

1861 Captain North Carolina State Troops; Im Mai 1861 schloß er sich der 1st North Carolina Cavalry an. Im Frühling 1862 LtCol in Hampton's Legion. Im Frühjahr 1863 Col; Skirmish in Hagerstown nach dem Rückzug von Gettysburg. BrigGen 28.9.1863; Briga­dekommandeur North Carolina Cavalry Brigade; Schlachten von Bethseda Church, Culpeper Courthouse, Auburn (verwundet), Mine Run, Spotsylvania, Yellow Tavern, Ground Squirrel Church; tödlich verwundet in der Schlacht von Meadow Bridge am 12.5.1864. Er starb 18.5.1864 in Richmond (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 348).

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History. Vol: 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 327

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Hartley, Chris J.: Stuart's Tarheels: James B. Gordon and his North Carolina Cavalry (Butternut & Blue, 1st Edition); 453 pages, 20 photos, 14 maps, index.

 

 

Gordon, John Brown:

CS-MajGen; Graduate der University of Georgia; dann Rechtsanwalt, anschließend Superintendent einer Kohlenmine in Alabama. Bei Kriegsausbruch sammelte er eine Freiwilligenkompanie aus Bergleuten aus Nord-Georgia, den 'Racoon Roughs', die er in die Georgia-Truppen eingliedern wollte. Als das infolge der Überfüllung der Freiwilligenquote in Georgia scheiterte und Georgia keine weiteren Freiwilligen aufnehmen konnte, schloß er sich mit seinen Leuten der Army in Alabama an (vgl. Catton: Terrible Swift Sword, a.a.O., S. 7; Gordon, John B.: Reminiscenses, a.a.O., S. 7-16) und wurde Captain in der 6th Alabama Infantry. Im Juli 1861 war Gordon Major in der 6th Alabama Infantry (vgl. Davis: Battle of Bull Run, a.a.O., S. 109; vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 130, 135). Colo­nel 6th Alabama Infantry seit ++++es 6th Alabama

 

Im Battle of Antietam/Sharpsburg Gordon with the 6th Alabama Infantry lined the infamous 'Sunken Road'. Gordon received five painful wounds, but impressed his superiors and peers with his courage and his charisma. While Gordon recovered, Lee promoted him to BrigGen an 1.11.1862, and assumed command of Lawton's Brigade shortly before the Chancellorsville Campaign (vgl. Mingus: Flames Beyond Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 7).

 

Da diese Beför­derung in Richmond nicht bestätigt wurde, erfolgte die erneute Beförderung zum BrigGen am 11.5.1863 mit dem Rang zum 7.5.1863 (vgl. Black, Linda G.: Gettysburg's Preview of War: Early's June 26, 1863, Raid; aus The Gettys­burg Ma­gazin, Heft Nr. 3); a.A. Mingus (vgl. Mingus: Flames Beyond Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 8n15): „Lee notified President Davis, that he wanted to place Gordon in charge of Rodes' Brigade, leaving Lawton's position vacant. However he finally named Gordon to the Georgians [Anm.: Georgia Brigade of Lawton]. The War Department confirmed Gordon's appointment on June 6, 1863“.

 

Er führte seine Brigade in Chancellorsville. Gordon's Brigade in MajGen Jubal A. Early's Division 2nd Corps LtGen Ri­chard S. Ewell; eingesetzt 1863 beim Vorstoß Lee's nach Pennsylvania; Skirmish am 26. Juni 1863 bei Cashville westlich Gettysburg mit der 26th Pennsylvania Militia (vgl. Black, Linda G.: Gettysburg's Preview of War: Early's June 26, 1863, Raid; aus The Gettys­burg Ma­gazin, Heft Nr. 3; Richard, H. M. M. Citizens of Gettysburg in The Union Army; in: Battles & Leaders Vol. III S. 289; Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 13).

 

Die Brigade bestand 1863 aus folgenden Regimentern (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 460):

- 13th Georgia Infantry Col James M. Smith

- 26th Georgia Infantry Col E. N. Atkinson

- 31st Georgia Infantry Col Clement A. Evans

- 38th Georgia Captain William L. McLeod

- 60th Georgia Infantry Captain W. B. Jones

- 61st Georgia Infantry Col James H. Lamar

 

During the Gettysburg Campaign BrigGen John B. Gordon led a mixed force of infantry, artillery, and cavalry. Troops under his command were the first to occupy Gettysburg, York, and Wrightsville, Pennsylvania (vgl. Mingus: Flames Beyond Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 9).

 

Promoted MajGen on 14.5.1864 (vgl. Wakelyn: Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 205).

 

Teilnahme an den Schlachten von Wilderness und Spotsylvania. MajGen am 14.5.1864 Divisionskommandeur in Petersburg und bei Early's Valley Campaign, anschließend erneut bis Ende 1864 in Petersburg eingesetzt. Gordon plante und führte den Angriff auf Fort Stedman in Petersburg. D.A.B. gibt fehlerhaft eine Beförderung zum LtGen an, ebenfalls B&L in der Rangliste für Appomattox. Gor­don war nie LtGen. In der Nachkriegszeit Demokratischer Politiker und US-Senator.

 

Bei Appomattox ergab sich Gen John B. Gordon as „officer in charge“ of the Army of Northern Virginia der Army of the Potomac. Gen Josua Chamberlain had been given the honor of officially receiving the Confederate surrender on 12.4.1865 (vgl. hierzu und zum Ablauf der Zeremonie: LaFantasie: Josua Chamberlain and the American Dream; in: Boritt: The Gettysburg Nobody Knows, a.a.O., S. 34-35).

 

Verheiratet mit Fanny Haralson Gordon. Seine Frau und seine Kinder begleiteten ihn während des Krieges und allen Feldzügen. Sie war ein erstgradiges Ärgernis für Gen Early, der einmal wünschte, sie möge dem Feind in die Hände fallen.

 

Photo:

General John Brown Gordon (Photo Matthew Brady, National Archives)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Eckert, Ralph: John Brown Gordon: Soldier, Southerner, American (LSU Press)

- **Gordon, John B.: Reminiscenses of the Civil War (Scribner's, New York 1903; reprint Time Life, N.Y. 1983); Anm.: "A superb sol­dier during the war, Gordon wrote a floridly romantic style and tailored his narrative to foster good relations between the North and South (vgl. Gallagher: Introduction zu Porter: "Fighting for the Confederacy", a.a.O., S. 555 Anm. 17). Gallagher (vgl. Gal­lagher: In­troduction zu Porter: "Fighting for the Confederacy", a.a.O., S. xvii) bezeichnet den Stil Gordons als Stil der "Gordon school of post­war writing".

- **Gordon, John B.: Letters. University of Georgia, Hargrett Library, Athens/Ga.

 

 

Gordon, Samuel:

US-+++

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gordon, Samuel: Papers (Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield / Illinois)

 

 

Gordon, William F.:

CS-Captain; Private in der 33rd Virginia Cavalry; 1863 wurde Gordon beauftragt, als Captain eine Company aufzustellen, die aller­dings nie 'commissioned' wurde. Gordon wurde hierbei gefangengenommen und wegen Rekrutierung hinter den US-Linien zum Tode verurteilt. Lincoln setzte sich sich für Gordon ein (vgl. Basler: Collected Works of Lincoln, vol. VII, a.a.O., S. 25: Brief Lincoln's an Ro­bert C. Schenck vom 20.11.1863).

 

 

Goree, Thomas Jewitt:

CS-Col und ADC (aide de camps) Longstreet's (vgl. Gallagher Anm. 11 S. 554 zu: Porter: Fighting for the Confederacy; Longstreet: From Manassas to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 47, 400)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Goree, Thomas J. (Major C.S.A.) - Longstreet's Aide, The Civil War Letters of Major Thomas J. Goree (Edited by Thomas Cutrer), University Press of Virginia, 1995 (Goree relates interesting portraits of Jeff Davis, Beauregard, Hood, Stuart, Longstreet and others)

- Goree, James Langston V. (ed.): The Thomas Jewitt Goree Letters (Bryan, Texas: Family History Foundation, 1981)

 

 

Gorgas, Josiah:

CS-BrigGen; 1818-1883; USMA 1841 (6/52); Ordnance. He served in various arsenals, spent time in Europe studying foreign ar­mies, and fought in the Mexican War before resigning 3.4.1861 as Captain (vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 349).

 

Ab 8.4.1861 ab 1861 war Col Gorgas Leiter des Ordnance Department im CS-Verteidigungsministerium (vgl. Newton: Joseph E. Johnston and the Defense of Richmond, a.a.O., S. 28; Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 49; vgl. Boatner: Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 344). He was faced with the staggering dearth of materiel and manufacturing in the South. However, by 1863 he had the ordnance bureau operating efficiently and was promoted through the grades, becoming BrigGen 10.11.1864. After the war he operated a blast furnace, than taught an was chancellor at Sewanee. He was also president and later librarian of the University of Alabama (vgl. Boatner: Dictiona­ry, a.a.O., S. 344).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Col. Josiah Gorgas, C.S.A.: Confederate Ordnance Manual: For use of the officers of the Confederate States Army. Prepared under direction of Colonel Gorgas with Introduction by Sydney Kerksis; 620 pp; Facsimile Reprint of 1863. Numerous Full-Page Illustrati­ons of Cannon, Swords, Muskets and Small Arms (Morningside Reprint)

- Col. Josiah Gorgas, C.S.A.: The Journals of Josiah Gorgas 1857-1878 (University of Alabama Press, 1947); 360 pp. Edited by Sa­rah Wiggins

- Gorgas, Josiah: „Ordnance of the Confederacy: Notes of Brig. Gen. Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance, C.S.A.“; in: Army Ordnance, XVI (January-February, 1936, S. 213-14

- **Vandiver, Frank E. (ed.): The Civil War Diary of General Josiah Gorgas (University of Alabama, 1947)

- **Vandiver, Frank E.: Ploughshares into Swords: Josiah Gorgas and Confederate Ordnance (Austin, 1952)

 

 

Gorham, James C.:

CS-Captain; Captain von Gorham's Battery, 3rd Field Battery Missouri Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M380 Roll 6).

 

Gorham's Battery was organized from guns captured at Lexington, MO on 20.9.1861. It was part of th Sixth Division, Missouri State Guard. Alexander B. „Buck“ Tilden was the units first lieutenant and Alexander A, Lesueur the second lieutenant. Both Tilden and Lesueur eventually commanded the battery after it entered the Confederate service. William Bull served his civil war days in this unit. James C. Gorham was from Marshall, Missouri (Saline County) and remained with the battery until General Thomas C. Hind­man replaced him with Tilden on 10.11.1862 (vgl. Banasik, Michel E. (ed.): Missouri Brothers in Gray. The Reminiscenses and Let­ters of William J. Bull and John P. Bull, Iowa City 1998, S. 27 Anm. 75).

 

 

Gorman, Willis A.:

US-BrigGen; Col 1st Minnesota Infantry; das Regiment wurde unter Willis A. Gorman in Fort Snelling als erster US-Freiwilligenre­giment aufgestellt; Battle of Balls Bluff (Farwell, Ball's Bluff, a.a.O., S. 69). The First Minnesota fought in almost every battle in the East and lost 215 of 262 men in a charge against the Confederates at Gettysburg, with 47 men still remaining and none missing in ac­tion.

 

BrigGen Gorman's Brigade; im Battle of Seven Pines / Fair Oaks Station, Virginia, May 31-June 1, 1862 traf Gorman's Brigade auf Jomes J. *Pettigrew's Brigade (vgl. Hess: Lee's Tar Heels, a.a.O., S. 59).

 

12.1.1816 Flemingsburg/Kentucky – † 20.5.1876. He was the only child of David and Elizabeth Gorman, both of Irish descent. In 1835, the family moved to Bloomington, Indiana, where Gorman graduated from Indiana University's law school in 1835 and esta­blished a law practice. In January 1836, he married Martha Stone in Bloomington. By 1837 he began his move into politics, beco­ming a clerk in the Indiana State Senate. From 1841 to 1844, he was elected to the Indiana House of Representatives.

 

In 1846 he volunteered for the army, enlisted as a private, and went to fight in the Mexican-American War. He was appointed as a major in the 3rd Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and led an independent rifle battalion at the Battle of Buena Vista, where he was sever­ely wounded. When his term of service expired, he re-enlisted and was appointed colonel of the 4th Indiana. He served in the capture of Huamantla and in several other campaigns and battles. In 1848 he was civil and military governor of Puebla, but soon after he re­turned to Indiana. He served in the United States House of Representatives from March 4, 1849, to March 3, 1853, as a representative of that state. Gorman, politically a Democrat, served as the second Territorial Governor of Minnesota from May 15, 1853, to April 23, 1857, at the appointment ofPresident Franklin Pierce. During his time as Governor of Minnesota, he masterminded an unsuc­cessful plan to move the capital of the territory from St. Paul to St. Peter, where he owned land that would have been eminently suita­ble for use as the new capitol grounds. The plan was sidetracked when legislator Joe Rolette disappeared with the bill until the last seconds of the legislative session. He spent a number of years practicing law in St. Paul, Minnesota, and served in the Minnesota House of Representatives from May 11, 1858, to January 1859.

 

With the secession of several Southern slave states, Gorman offered his services to the army. He was appointed Colonel of the 1st Minnesota Infantry, serving in the First Battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861. On September 7, 1861, he was appointed BrigGen of volunteers and assigned to command a brigade in the II Corps in Army of the Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign. His troops suffered high casualties during the Battle of Antietam in an ill-fated attack on Confederate positions in the West Woods. Later in the year, he was assigned to command the District of Eastern Arkansas.

 

In 1864 he left the service and resumed his law practice in St. Paul. He was elected City attorney in 1869, and continued in that posi­tion until his death. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery in St. Paul (aus https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willis_A._Gorman).

 

°° mit Emily Newington Gorman (1827-1879) (vgl. www.findagrave.com)

 

Photo:

Willis Gorman and wife (hier angegeben als Martha Stone (!) (Photo v. Matthew Brady  Library of Congress, Brady-Handy Photo­graph Collection)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gorman, Willis Arnold: Boundary of Texas. [Washington: Printed at the Congressional Globe Office, 1850].

- Gorman, Willis Arnold: Message of the Governor of the Ter. of Minnesota, to the Legislature, at the commencement of the eighth annual session. Saint Paul: Thomas Foster, 1857.
- Gorman, Willis Arnold: Speech of Hon. W. A. Gorman, of Indiana, against appropriations for internal improvements by the general government. Washington City: Towers, printer, [1851?].
- “Life and Public Services of Hon. Willis A. Gorman.” In Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society, Vol. 3, Part 3. St. Paul: Published by the Minnesota Historical Society, 1880. 

- Imholte, John Q.: The First Volunteers History of the First Minnesota Volunteer Regiment, 1861-1865 (Minneapolis, 1963)

- Holcombe, R. I.: History of the First Regiment Minnesota Volunteers (Stillwater 1916); 508 pages

 

 

Goss, Warren Lee:

US-Sergeant, Co. H; 2nd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 16); twice captured and imprisoned at Libby and Belle Isle, Goss wrote numerous books about the war.

 

19.8.1835 Brewster, Barnstable County / Mass. - † 20.11.1925 Bergen County, New Jersey; beerd. Yantic Cemetery, Norwich, New London County, Connecticut; °° mit Emily Antoinette Torbush Goss (1846 – 1912) (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf 6.10.2016).

 

Photo:

Warren Lee Goss (vgl. www.findagrave.com)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Goss, Warren L. (Sgt, 2nd Mass Heavy Artillery): Recollections of a Private (New York, 1890); Twice caputred and imprisoned at Libby and Belle Isle, Goss wrote numerous books about the war; this is his most famous

- Goss, Warren L. (Sgt, 2nd Mass Heavy Artillery): The Soldier's Story of Captivitiy at Andersonville, Belle Isle and other Rebel Pri­sons (Boston 1868); Illustrations by Thomas Nast; 274 pp with Appendix

 

 

Gossen, John:

US-Captain; 69th Regiment New State Militia; had served with 7th Hussaren-Regiment, Österreich-Ungarn (vgl. Craughwell: Grea­test Brigade, a.a.O., S. 44).

 

 

Gould, John Meade:

US-Major; zunächst Pvt, Co. C, 1st Regiment Maine Infantry (3 months, 1861) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8); anschließend Sergeant Major und 1stLt, Co. F&S, 10th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8; vgl. Sears: Landscape Turned Red, a.a.O., S. 108); dann Adjutant und zuletzt Major, Co. F&S, 29th Regiment Maine Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M543 Roll 8).

 

Gould enlisted in the 1st Maine and transferred to the 10th Maine with the 1st was disbanded. His unit fought at Antietam and Cedar Mountain and he wro­te extensively on these engagements. He later enlisted in the 29th Maine and fought at New Orleans, Red River, Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, ending the war performing occupation duty in South Carolina. Nach dem Krieg sammelte Gould Tausende von Briefen von Teilnehmern der Schlacht von Antietam, die unveröffentlicht blieben, und in der Dartmouth Library im Archiv ver­schwanden. Erst Stephen W. *Sears stieß aufgrund eines Hinweises von Bruce *Catton auf dieses Material, das er bei seinem Werk über die Schlacht von Antietam benutzte (vgl. Sears, Landscape Turned Red, a.a.O., S. 373).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gould, John M.: History of the First, Tenth, Twenty-ninth Maine Regiment (Portland / Maine: Stephen Berry, 1871; Reprint Butter­nut and Blue); 584 pages, 90 Photos and Illustrations

- Gould, John Mead (1st, 10th and 29th Maine): The Civil War Journals of John Meade Gould 1861-1866 (Butternut and Blue); 584 pages; 90 Photos and Illustrations

- Gould, John M.: Joseph K. F. Mansfield: A Narrative of Events Connected with His Mortal Wounding at Antietam (Portland / Mai­ne, 1895)

- Gould, John M.: Collection of Papers Relating to the Battle of Antietam; Dartmouth College Library, Hanover /New Hampshire

 

 

Gould, Joseph:

US-Quartermaster Sergeant; Co. F, 48th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 45).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gould, Joseph: The 48th in the War (Regimental Association, 1908)

 

 

Gould, Newton T.:

US-Sergeant; Co. G, 113th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 34).

 

Pvt Gold erhielt am 6.9.1894 die Medal of Honor für seinen Einsatz bei Vicksburg for „Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party" (vgl. National Park, Medal of Honor Recipients, Newton T. Gould).

 

 

Gould, Ozro B.:

US-Captain, Co. G, 55th Regiment Ohio Infantry; er trat als Sergeant in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers, M552 Roll 10).

 

Photo:

- Captain Ozro D. Gould (vgl. Osborn: Trials and Triumphs. The Record of the Fifty-Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a.a.O., S. 84)

 

 

Gouldsbery, Thomas:

US-+++; Teilnahme am Battle of Fredericksburg 1862 (vgl. Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 74 Anm. 12)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gouldsbery, Thomas: Letter to his Brother, 125.12.1862 (Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park Library, Frede­ricksburg, VA.)

 

 

Gourdin, T. S.:

CS-Journalist; aus Florida; Herausgeber des "Southern Confederacy"; Gourdin vertrat die Meinung, 'daß der Süden die alte Idee der Vorväter aufgeben müsse, daß alle Menschen frei und gleich geboren seien; vielmehr müsse die Doktrin der Ungleichheit der Rassen und die Überlegenheit der Anglo-Sächsischen Rasse anerkannt werden (vgl. Nevins: Ordeal of the Union; Vol. III: The improvised War, a.a.O., S. 11 Anm. 1)

 

 

Govan, A. R.:

CS-Captain; 17th Mississippi Infantry, Barkdale's Brigade; im Battle of Fredericksburg war Govan's Company in der Stadt Frede­ricksburg in vorderster Linie am Rappahannock eingesetzt, um den US-Brückenschlag bei der Fähre zu verzögern (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., 2: 333).

 

 

Govan, Daniel Chevilette:

CS-+++Gen; 1829-1911; 1861 LtCol 2nd Arkansas Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Govan, Daniel C.: Papers, 1861-1908 (Southern Historical Collection)

- Govan, D. C.: Letter (Shiloh National Military Park, Shiloh / Tennessee: 2nd Arkansas File)

 

 

Gove, Jesse A.:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 16); Gove übernahm am 27.10.1861 die Colonelcy des Regiments nach dem Rücktritt von Senator Henry *Wilson; Gove war zuvor Captain Co. I, 10th Regiment US-Infantry gewesen (vgl. Bennett: Musket and Sword, a.a.O., S. 35).

 

Gove stammte aus New Hampshire und war Graduate der Military Academy in Norwich/Vermont (vgl. Bennett: Musket and Sword, a.a.O., S. 35). Jesse A. Gove was born in Weare, New Hampshire, the son of Squire and Dolly (Atwood) Gove. In 1845, he entered Norwich University (Norwich, Vermont), but interrupted his studies in 1847 to serve in the Mexican War, first as a Second Lieutenant, then as a First Lieutenant, in the 9th U.S. Infantry Regiment. After the war, he returned to Norwich and graduated with a B.S. degree in 1849. Gove then moved to Concord, New Hampshire, to study law and was admitted to the bar in 1851. He had his own office there until 1855, and was also Deputy Secretary of State for New Hampshire. In 1852, he married Maria Louise Sherburne of Concord. They had one daughter, Jessie, who married the Hon. John H. Pearson, and one son, Charles A. (U.S. Naval Academy, Class of 1876). Gove was also a member of Mount Horeb Commandery, Knights Templar, in Concord. In 1855, Gove returned to military service, being commissioned Captain, Company I, 10th U.S. Infantry Regiment, by President Franklin Pierce. Gove served in the Minnesota and Utah Territories before the Civil War erupted. When Col. Henry Wilson returned to his senatorial duties, Gove was commissioned Colonel of the 22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment.


In what became known as the Seven Days' Battles, on June 27, 1862, at Gaines's Mill, Virginia, Colonel Gove was shot through his heart by a minie ball and died instantly. One of his non-commissioned officers, who had been taken prisoner of war, recognized the body and removed the colonel's belt, which he later presented to Colonel Gove's widow, but due to the circumstances, could not recover the body. If Colonel Gove's body was ever buried, it was not marked by name (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 25.7.2016; vgl. History of Norwich University, 1819-1911 ed. by William A. Ellis, 3 vols. (Montpelier, Vt., 1911), 2: 449-51; vgl. Norwichs University: Her History, her Graduates, her Roll of Honor compiled by William A. Ellis (Concord, N.H., 1898), pp. 301-02; and a memorial pamphlet titled COLONEL JESSE A. GOVE, U.S.A., FELL AT GAINES' MILLS, JUNE 27, 1862 (Concord, N.H., 1870). 

 

5.12.1824 Weare, Hillsborough County/New Hampshire - † gef. 27.6.1862 Battle of Gaines Mill (vgl. www.findagra­ve.com).

 

 

Graaf, Arther van de:

s. van de Graaf

 

 

Grace, Newell:

US-1stLt; Co. H, 24th Regiment Michigan Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M545 Roll 16). 2ndLt Co. H 26.7.1862, 1stLt March 1863 to rank from 13.12.1862; † mortally wounded 1.7.1863 Gettysburg, died at Seminary Hospital 3.7.1863 (vgl. Curtis: 24th Michigan, a.a.O., S. 364).

 

In der Vorkriegszeit war Grace Rechtsanwalt in New York (vgl. Curtis: 24th Michigan, a.a.O., S. 43).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Curtis: History of the Twenty-Fourth Michigan, a.a.O., S. 43, 128, 175, 181, 364

 

 

Gracey, Samuel L.:

US-Chaplain; Co, F&S, 6th Regiment Pennsylvania Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M554 Roll 45).

 

Verfasser der Regimentsge­schichte (vgl. Gracey, Samuel L.: Annals of the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry (Vanberg Publishing; Reprint of 1868 original); Gracey trat am 6.9.1861 für drei Jahre in das Regiment ein; am 17.6.1865 wurde er versetzt zur 2nd. Prov. Cavalry (vgl. Wittenberg, Eric J.: Rush’s Lancers: The Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry in the Civil War, Westholme Publishing 2007, Appendix:Roster of the Sixth Penn­sylvania Cavalry, S. 3). Teilnahme an Stoneman's Raid in the Chancellorsville Campaign, April-Mai 1863 (Central Virginia Raid) (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids of the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 160).

 

Photo:

Chaplain Samuel L. Gracey (Photo U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle, Pennsylvania).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gracey, Samuel L.: Annals of the Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry (Vanberg Publishing; Reprint of 1868 original); new Introduction by Eric Wittenberg; 371 pp; Index; Record of Officers. The 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry served at Fair Oaks, Gaines's Mill, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Brandy Station, Gettysburg and other battles.

 

 

Graebner, Alexander:

US-Corporal; Co. B, 46th Regiment New York Infantry; er trat als Sergeant in das Regiment ein und war zuletzt im Rang eines Corporal (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 54).

 

 

Graham, John:

CS-Pvt; Co. H, 14th Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 17).

 

 

Graham, Matthew J.:

US-Lt; Co. A 9th New York Infantry (Hawkin's Zouaves)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Graham, Matthew J. (Lieutenant, Co A): The Ninth Regiment New York Volunteers (Hawkin's Zouaves) (Van Berg Publishing, 1998); with Introduction by Brian Pohanka; 634 pp; Rosters; with Added Index. Hawkins' Zouaves spearheaded the Union assault into Sharpsburg during the battle of Antietam, advancing farther than any other unit on the bloodiest day.

 

 

Graham, Michael:

US-Spion; Graham was a contractor, who lived in Winchester/Shenandoah/VA, where he posed as a Southern sympathize, and as such, spied for US-Gen R. H. Milton. Graham was also known to Halleck and Stanton. Graham had wormed into the Confidence of CS-Col L. T. Moore, who on account of wounds suffered at Bull Run, was no longer on active duty. Moore told Graham that Gen. Robert E. Lee had been reinforced by Longstreet's Corps plus the greater part of Gen Samuel Jones's cavalry (Jenkins, W. E. Jones, and Imboden). Lee also had a long pontoon bridge with which he was going to cross the Rappahannock and advance toward Manas­sas, where he would have a decisive battle with Hooker. After defeating Hooker he swould cross the Potomac into Maryland. Moore's information was coming from a member of Lee's staff, whom he called Col Colton (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 33; OR XXV Pt. 2, p. 570-71).

 

 

Granbury, Hiram Bronson:

CS-+++Gen; 1.3.1831 - † 30.11.1864, gef. im Battle of Franklin; Kommandeur von Granbury's Texas Brigade.

 

Photo:

- Buck, Irving A. (Captain C.S.A.): "Cleburne and his Command", a.a.O., S. 18

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Brown, Norman D. (ed.): One of Cleburne’s Command: The Civil War Reminiscenses and Diary of Capt. Samuel T. *Foster, Gran­bury’s Texas Brigade, CSA (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1980); Forster's Erinnerungen sind neben Captain Key's Diary, eine der wichtigsten Quellen der CS-Seite der Atlanta Campaign (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 583 Anm. 15).

 

 

Granger, Gordon:

US-MajGen; 1822-1876; aus New York; West Point 1845 (35/41). Rifles. Im Mexikokrieg erhielt er 2 Brevets und war danach an der Frontier eingesetzt (vgl. Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 128). zum Captain befördert am 5.5.1861; nach Kriegsausbruch Muste­rungsoffizier in Ohio, dann als LtCol der Ohio Miliz im Stab McClellan's vom 23.4.-31.5.1861 (vgl. McClellan: Civil War Papers, S. 7, 9; McClellan: Own Story, a.a.O., 44; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 351). Anschließend unter Samuel D. *Sturgis in Missouri eingesetzt (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 351), traf mit Sturgis Truppen am 7.7.1861 in Clinton, Mo. mit den Nathaniel *Lyon und dessen Truppen zu­sammen, und folgte deren Vorstoß nach Südwest-Missouri (vgl. Brooksher, a.a.O., S. 128). Bis September 1862 kommandierte Gran­ger eine Division in der Army of the Mississippi bei Corinth; er wurde am 12.9.1862 nach Kentucky beordert und übernahm das Kom­mando der Army of Kentucky und die Verteidigung von Cincinnatti (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 26 mit Karte S. 25).

 

Nach dem Befehl von Gen Rosecrans vom 8.6.1863 wurde die Army of the Cumberland reorganisiert und Gordon Granger übernahm das neu gebildete Reserve Corps der Army of the Cumberland (vgl. Welcher / Ligget: Coburn's Brigade, a.a.O., S. 107)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Boatner, a.a.O., S. 351

 

 

Granger, Major:

US-Major, 7th Michigan Infantry

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History. Vol: 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 316, 358

 

 

Grant, Joseph E.:

US-+++; 12th Rhode Island Infantry (vgl. Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 75 Anm. 20).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grant, Joseph E.: The Flying Regiment: Journal of the Campaign of the 12th Regt. Rhode Island Volunteers (Providence, R.I.: Sid­ney S. Rider and Brothers, 1865)

 

 

Grant, Julia Dent:

Ehefrau von U.S. *Grant; Tochter von Frederick *Dent; Kusine von James *Longstreet (vgl. Memoirs, S. 63 Anm. 20).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grant, Julia Dent: The Personal Memoirs of Julia Dent Grant, ed. John Y. Simmons (New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1975)

- Ross, Ishbel: The General's Wife: The Life of Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant (New York, 1959)

 

 

Grant, Lemuel P.:

CS-Captain; aus Atlanta; Pionieroffizier; 1864 war Grant zuständig für den Ausbau des Stellungssystems von Atlanta (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 71).

 

 

Grant, Lewis A.:

US-Col, Col 5th Vermont Infantry; Grant erhielt für sein Verhalten im Battle of Chancellorsville die Congressional Medal of Honor (vgl. Beyer / Keydel [eds.]: Deeds of Valor, a.a.O., S. 145/146).

 

Photo:

- Beyer / Keydel, a.a.O., S. 145

 

 

Grant, Tom:

CS-Pvt (?); 13th Alabama Infantry; Color Bearer (Fahnenträger des Regiments) (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 84)

 

 

Grant, Ulysses Simpson:

27.4.1822-23.7.

 

Geboren als Hiram Ulysses Grant; durch einen Fehler bei seiner Registrierung in West Point wurde er als U. S. Grant eingetragen und benutzte diesen Namen zeitlebens.

 

West Point 1843 (21/39)

 

verheiratet mit Julia Dent *Grant; deren Vater hatte gegen die Heirat Bedenken, da er glaubte, seine Tochter sei für das unruhige, ständigem Umzug unterworfenen Soldatenleben ungeeignet. Grant entgegnete darauf, er sei bereit aus der Armee auszuscheiden und habe ein Angebot als Professor an einem College in Ohio (Grant, Julia: Personal Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 51). Grant bestätigt diesen Be­richt in einem Brief an Julia Dent vom Oktober 1845 und gibt an, Aussicht auf eine Professur für Mathematik am College von Hills­borough / Ohio zu haben (a.a.O., S. 63 Anm. 10 m.w.N.; Simon [ed.]: The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, vol. 1, S. 59). Dent's Vater hielt es jedoch für das Beste, wenn Grant Soldat bleibe und befürwortete die Ehe.

 

Grant war als Berufssoldat im Range eines Captain 1854 in Ungnade gefallen; letzteres ist fraglich; Julia Dent Grant schreibt in ih­rem Memoiren, Grant sei nach 2jähriger Abkommandierung nach Kalifornien, aus der Armee ausgeschieden, um zu seiner Familie zurückkehren zu können (Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 75); Grant selbst gibt als Grund seines Ausscheidens aus der Army an (Grant, Personal Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 110), er sei aufgrund der hohen Preise in Kalifornien während seiner dortigen Stationierung außerstande gewesen, seine Familie im Osten finanziell zu unterhalten.

 

Von 1854 bis 1858 war Grant Farmer auf einer im Eigentum seiner Frau stehenden Farm nahe St. Louis / MO (Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, S. 111; Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 77-80), gab die Tätigkeit jedoch aufgrund einer Malariaerkrankung auf, obwohl er nach der Schilderung von Julia Dent Grant sehr erfolgreich war (Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 80). Anschließend war er zu­sammen mit Harry Boggs, einem Cousin seiner Frau, Grundstücksmakler in St. Louis. 1860. Die Tätigkeit war nicht erfolgreich, da die Schuldner der Firma nicht zahlten (Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 111; Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 80-83), wodurch Grant in Schulden geriet (Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 80-83). Grant nahm deshalb ein Angebot seines Vaters an, als Ange­stellter in dessen Geschäft in Galena / Ill. zu arbeiten (Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, S. 113)..

 

Am 15.6.1861 zum Col. 21st Illinois Regiment (State Militia) ernannt durch Gov. Yates (Grant, Memoirs, S. 128). BrigGen Anfang August 1861 mit Rang vom 17.5.1861 (vgl. Catton: Grant Moves South, a.a.O., S. 17; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 353) und Kommandeur im Bezirk Südwest-Missouri in Ironton seit 8.8.1861.

 

Grant bezeichnete sich selbst als der Demokratischen Partei nahestehend (Catton: Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 17), gibt selbst an, Anhänger der Whig Party gewesen zu sein, war eine Woche Mitglied der American Party (Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 112), wählte der Präsidentschaftswahl von 1856 um die Sezession zu vermeiden, den Demokraten James Buchanan (Grant, a.a.O., S. 113). 1860 stand Grant den Republikanern unter Lincoln nahe (Grant, U.S.: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 114).

 

Zu Beginn des Krieges Col. der 41. Illinois Volunteer Infantry (ab 16.6.1861; vgl. Catton, Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 5). Julia Dent Grant gibt dagegen die Beförderung zum Col. der 21st Illinois Inf. an (Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 91; vgl. auch Anm. 4 S. 114: Grant wurde am 15.6.1861 von Governor Yates zum Col. des 7th Congressional District Regiment ernannt; obwohl Grant selbst am 19.6.1861 angibt Col. des 21st Illinois zu sein, wurde der Name offiziell erst bei der Musterung in den US-Service am 28.6.1861 an das Regiment vergeben.

 

Grant erreichte postalisch am 8.8.1861 rückwirkend zum 17.5.1861 wurde er zum BrigGen befördert (vgl. Catton: Grant Moves South, a.a.O., S. 18; Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 12) und mit *Grant's Brigade am 8.8.1861 nach *Ironton / Southeast Missouri verlegt (vgl. Catton, a.a.O., S. 18-19). BrigGen Benjamin *Prentiss löste auf Befehl von MajGen Frémont BrigGen USS Grant als Befehlshaber der Streitkräfte in Südost-Missouri am 18. August 1861 ab; hierbei ging Frémont fehlerhaft davon aus, daß Prentiss rangälter als Grant sei, obwohl beide die Ernennung zum BrigGen am gleichen Tage erhalten hatten und in diesem Falle die Seniorität vom früheren Rang in der regulären US Army abhing, wo Grant als Captain höherrangig war (vgl. Catton, Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 27 f.). Frémont berichtet (Frémont: "In Command in Missouri"; in: Battles and Leaders, vol. I, S. 284: Am 28.8.1861 ernannte ich BrigGen U. S. Grant zum Befehlshaber in Südost-Missouri mit Hauptquartier in Cairo .... and to take posses­sion of points threatened by the Confederates at the Mississippi and Kentucky shore." Später gab es unterschiedliche Ansichten dar­über, wer die Ernennung Grant's entscheidend beeinflußt hatte und ob dahinter der politische Einfluß des Congreßabgeordneten Wash­burne aus Galena / Illinois steckte (s. Zusammenstellung bei Catton Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 28 f., 37 f), wie auch Grant offensichtlich vermutete (Catton Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 46 mit Abdruck eines Briefes von Grant an Washburne vom 3.9.1861)

 

++++

 

Shiloh:

Grant schreibt (Grant: The Battle of Shiloh; in: Battle and Leaders Vol. I S. 466): "...to receive from my chief a dispatch of the latter (4.3.1862) date, saying: 'You will place Major-General C. F. Smith in command of expedition, and remain yourself at Fort Henry....' I was left virtually in arrest on board of a steamer, without even a guard, for about a week, when I was released and ordered to resume my command."

 

Nach dem Sieg von Fort Donelson geriet Grant's Karriere in erhebliche Gefahr, da von mißgünstiger Seite Gerüchte über eine angeb­liche Trunksucht Grant in die Welt gesetzt worden waren (Anm.: Catton, Vorwort zu Julia Dent Grant: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 1 meint, an der angeblichen Trunksucht Grant's sei kein Wort zutreffend). MajGen Grant hatte den korrupten Quartermaster Captain Reuben B. *Hatch verdächtigt, die negativen Verdächtigungen der Trunkenheit über Grant verbreitet zu haben (vgl. Potter, Sultana, a.a.O., S. 37/38; Catton, Grant moves South, a.a.O., S. 98 jeweils m.w.N.; s. weiter oben sowie bei *Kountz). Hintergrund könnten auch Aus­einandersetzungen zwischen radikalen und konservativen Unionisten in Missouri gewesen sein (vgl. hierzu: Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 56 ff.), wie Schofield (Schofield: Forty-Six Years, a.a.O., S. 61) andeutet. Col. *Hillyer aus Grant's Stab äußerte ggü. Julia Dent *Grant, Kountz habe Telegramme von Grant an *Halleck unterbunden (vgl. Grant, Julia Dent, a.a.O., S. 96). Grant wurde unter dem Vorwurf am 4.3.1862 abgelöst, keine Stärkemeldung trotz ausdrücklichen Befehl an Halleck gegeben zu haben. Diese An­gabe von Julia Dent Grant kann allerdings nicht zutreffen, da sich Kountz bereits seit Januar in Haft befand und sich Mrs. Grant ab dem Angriffsbeginn auf beiden Forts nicht mehr bei Grant's Stab befand.

 

Nach aA. erfolgte die Ablösung Grant's vom 4.3.1862 durch Halleck aufgrund persönlicher Abneigung Halleck's und um Eifersucht auf die Erfolge Grant's (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 51-53), sowie fernmeldetechnische Probleme. Ein CS-Sympathisant im Tele­graphenbüro hatte Befehle Halleck's an Grant zurückgehalten (vgl. Daniel, a.a.O., S. 55; Grant: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 219). Die Ab­lösung war nur von kurzer Dauer; in Washington kam es zur Intervention durch Senator Washburn und Secretary of War Stanton. Mehrere hochrangige Untergebene Grant's, darunter McClernand (der politisch einflußreich war) intervenierten zugunsten Grant's. Auch Prä­sident Lincoln fragte nach den Gründen für Gründen für die Ablösung des Kriegshelden Grant. Die Dinge kehrten sich ge­gen Hal­leck, der auf Anfrage der US-Regierung sogleich einlenkte und die Wiedereinsetzung am 14.3.1862 Grant's anordnete (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 55; DeHaas, Wills: Battle of Shiloh; in: Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 683).

 

In der Shiloh-Campaign befand sich der Journalist Whitelaw *Reid bei der 3rd Division BrigGen Lew Wallace in Crumb's Landing; als US Grant mit dem Hauptquartierschiff USS Tigress am frühen Morgen in Crumb's Landing eintraf und sich mit Divisions­kommandeur Wallace abstimmte, hörte Reid das Gespräch an; anschließend ritt Reid nach Pittsburg Landing, wo er zeitgleich mit Grant eintraf. Reid berichtete über die Schlacht in der Cincinnati Gazette; sein Bericht war ein "Shocker", denn Reid hatte herausge­bracht, daß Grant's Army vom Angriff der CS-Army of the Mississippi völlig überrascht worden war; Reid behauptete weiterhin, Grant's Army sei völlig führungslos gewesen und nur um Haaresbreite einer Niederlage entgangen. dies stand in völligem Gegensatz zu ei­nem vorausgegangenen ersten Report über die Schlacht durch den Herald Reporter W. C. *Carroll. Zusammenfassend kam Reid zum Ergebnis, daß die Schlacht nur durch den Einsatz von Buell's Army of the Ohio und durch die Führungskunst von MajGen Don Car­los Buell gewonnen worden sei. Der Bericht war in wesentlichen Teilen falsch; nachdem andere Reporter jedoch ähnliches be­richteten, sowie Behauptungen über die angebliche Trunksucht Grant's.

 

 

Halleck ./. Grant:

zu den Intrigen Halleck's gegen Grant (vgl. Cozzens: The Darkest Days, a.a.O., S. 14, 16).

 

 

Trunksucht:

Grant stand im Ruf Alkoholiker zu sein. Catton (Vorwort zu Julia Dent Grant: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 1) meint hierzu, an der angebli­chen Trunksucht Grant's sei kein Wort zutreffend (vgl. auch Cattons Diskussion der unterschiedlichen Darstellungen bei Rawlins und Cadwallader bei Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 3-5; vgl. auch die Haltung Julia Dent Grant's nach der Veröffentlichung von Rawlins' Brief in ih­ren Memoiren: Vorwort, S. 22). Bei den späteren Vorwürfen kann es sich um einen Racheakt von US-Navy-Captain *Kountz oder an­derer Personen gehandelt haben (s. d. und weiter unten).

 

Zu den Verdächtigungen der angeblichen Trunkenheit Grant's in Shiloh schreibt Mrs. Cherry am 6.12.1892 (Confederate Veteran Vol. I Feb. 1893, S. 44), in deren Haus Grant in der Nacht vor Beginn der Schlacht übernachtete und am Morgen bei Feuereröffnung gera­de frühstückte: "Gen Grant was thoroughly sober (nüchtern)". Captain William R. *Rowley aus Galena / Iliinois, Mitglied im Stab Grant's bestätigt dies und bezeichnet die Vorwürfe als infame Lüge. Dies wird auch durch Col John Eugene *Smith von der 45th Illi­nois Infantry und von Brigadekommandeur Col Jacob *Ammen bestätigt (vgl. Catton: Grant Moves South, a.a.O., S. 259).

 

 

Juden-Erlaß:

CS-Agenten wie Thomas H. *Hines waren dazu eingesetzt, Baumwolle in Mississippi zu kaufen, nach Norden durch die US-Linien zu schmuggeln und teuer in US-Währung zu verkaufen, um auf diese Weise Geldmittel für den Süden zu beschaffen (vgl. Tidwell, April 65. Confederate Covert Action, a.a.O., S. 65). Bereits Grant hatte diese Gefahr gesehen und versucht den Schmuggel zu unter­binden, u.a. durch seinen berüchtigten "Juden-Erlaß" Nr. 11 von 17.12.1862 (vgl. Catton, Grant Moves South, a.a.O., S. 347-356 ff., 353; Dana, Recollections, S. 18: Dana führt den Schmuggel nach seinen eigenen Erfahrungen im Baumwollhandel auf jüdische Händler zurück). Grant's General Order Nr. 11 vom 17.12..1862, der die Juden aus dem Department of the Tennessee ausschloß, war damals und ist heute umstritten (zur Diskussion vgl. Korn, Bertrand Wallace: American Jewry and the Civil War [Philadelphia, 1951]). Beide Häuser des US-Kongresses lehnten Anträge auf Verurteilung Grant's ab, der von U.S. Representative Elihu B. Wash­burne mit vollem Einsatz verteidigt wurde (vgl. Simon, John Y.: From Galena to Appomattox: Grant and Washburne; in: Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, LVIII [Sommer, 1965]; S. 176-77)

 

Photos:

Davis/Wiley, Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 17

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Abbott, John S. C.: The Life of General Ulysses S. Grant. Containing a brief but faithful narrative of those military and diplomatic achievements which have entitled him to the confidence and gratitude of his countrymen (B. B. Russell, Boston, 1868)

- Badeau, Adam: Grant in Peace from Appomattox to Mount McGregor: A Personal Memoir (Hartford, 1887)

- Boyd, James P.: Military and Civil Life of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant .. (Philadelphia and Chicago, 1885)

- Catton, Bruce: U.S. Grant and the American Military Tradition (New York, 1954)

- Catton, Bruce: Grant Moves South (Boston and Toronto, 1960)

- Catton, Bruce: "U.S. Grant: Men of Letters," American Heritage, XIX (June, 1968)

- Catton, Bruce: Grant Takes Command (Boston and Toronto, 1969)

- **Chetlain, Augustus L.: „Recollections of U. S. Grant,“ in: Vol. I, Military Essays and Recollections, pp.22-23

- **Church, William Conant: Ulysses S. Grant and the Period of National Preservation and Reconstruction, New York 1897

- **Conger, A. L.: The Rise of U. S. Grant (New York, 1931)

- **Coolidge, Louis A.: Ulysses S. Grant, Boston and New York 1917

- **Coppee, Henry: Life and Services of General U. S. Grant, Chicago 1868

- **Cramer, Jesse Grant (ed.): Letters of Ulysses S. Grant to his Father and his Youngest Sister, New York 1912

- **Crane, James L.: "Grant as a Colonel," in: McClure's Magazine, Vol. VII, pp. 40-45

- **Emerson, John W. (Colonel): "Grant's Life in the West," Midland Monthly - Journal of the Military Service Institution of The Uni­ted States, Januar 1898, p. 50 ff

- **Garland, Hamlin: Ulysses S. Grant: His Life and Character (1923, reprint Ulan Press 2012)

- **Grant, Ulysses S.: Grant Papers, Missouri Historical Society+++

- **Grant, Ulysses S.: Grant Papers, Illinois State Historical Library

- Grant, Ulysses S.: Letters of U.S. Grant to General James B. McPherson, Rutgers University Library+++

- Grant/Washburne. Papers. Illinois State Library, Springfield (ILSL)

- Grant 3rd, Ulysses S.: Ulysses S. Grant, Warrior and Statesman (New York, 1969) Anm.: der Autor ist der Enkel Grant's; US-Gene­ral

- Hesseltine, William B.: Ulysses S. Grant, Politician (New York, 1935)

- **Lewis, Lloyd: Captain Sam Grant. Boston, 1950

- McCrane, James L.: "Grant as a Colonel," in: McClure's Magazine, Vol VII, S. 40-45

- Pitkin, Thomas M.: The Captain Departs: Ulysses S. Grant's Last Campaign (Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, 1973)

- Porter, Horace (General): Campaining with Grant (Reprint of 1897 original)

- **Ringwalt, J. L.: Anecdotes of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant (Philadelphia 1886)

- Simon, John Y.: From Galena to Appomattox: Grant and Washburne; in: Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, LVIII [Som­mer, 1965]; S. 176-77

- Simond, John Y.: The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant (Carbondale and Edwardsville, Illinois, 1967)

- Thayer, John M. (General): "Grant at Pilot Knob"; McClure's Magazin, Vol. V S. 433 ff

- Young, John Russell: Around the World with General Grant (New York, 1879)

 

 

Gratham, Mathew:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 1st Regiment Alabama Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 17); auch als Mathew Grantham erfaßt

 

 

Graves, Bernard Bluecher:

CS-1st Sgt Nelson's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Hanover Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 22)

 

Photo:

Graves, Bernard Bluecher, Corp. C.S.A. (Library of Congress LC-B8184-10036)

 

 

Graves, F:

US-Col; Col 8th Michigan Infantry während Grant's Vicksburg Campaign 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg vol. III, S. 1145).

 

 

Graves, John Azariah:

CS-LtCol; 18.11.1822 Yanceyville, Caswell County/NC - † 2.3.1864 Johnson's Island Prison/NY an den Folgen eines Schlaganfalls; Graves' body was sent to friends in Philadelphia and later transported home to Yanceyville, N.C. where he is buried in the First Bap­tist Church Cemetery (vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Graves war zunächst ab 29.4.1861 Captain Co. A, 13th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 5; vgl. http:// www.civilwarindex.com, 47th North Carolina Infantry Roster, S. 325; vgl. http://www.findagrave.com); dann ab 24.3. 1862 Major 47th North Carolina Infantry Regiment; am 5.1.1863 zum LtCol in 47th North Carolina Infantry Regiment befördert (vgl. http:// www.civilwarindex.com, 47th North Carolina Infantry Roster, S. 325; vgl. http://www.findagrave.com).

 

Am 3.7.1863 im Battle of Gettysburg verwundet und kriegsgefangen (vgl. http:// www.civilwarindex.com, 47th North Carolina In­fantry Roster, S. 325).

 

 

Graves, L. H.:

CS-Lt; Co K 6th Texas Cavalry; aus McKinney / Texas; Graves join the command of Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch in 1861. He was present at the battle of Pea Ridge (Benton County) on March 6-7, 1862, and followed his regiment east of the Missis­sippi during the weeks following the engagement. Seriously wounded in the fighting at Corinth, Mississippi, on October 3-4, 1862, Graves spent the next months recuperating as a prisoner of the Federals at Iuka, Mississippi. He did not rejoin his regiment until May 1, 1863, at Shelbyville, Tennessee. The diary contains descriptions of the two battles, of Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch, and glimpses of Graves's home life prior to his enlistment at McKinney, Texas.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Graves, L. H.: Diaries, May 1, 1861-April 1, 1864; 1 roll. First Lieutenant L. H. Graves, Company K, Sixth Texas Cavalry, began keeping his diary when he first set out from Texas to join the command of Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch in 1861. He was present at the battle of Pea Ridge (Benton County) on March 6-7, 1862, and followed his regiment east of the Mississippi during the weeks following the engagement. Seriously wounded in the fighting at Corinth, Mississippi, on October 3-4, 1862, Graves spent the next months recuperating as a prisoner of the Federals at Iuka, Mississippi. He did not rejoin his regiment until May 1, 1863, at Shel­byville, Tennessee. The diary contains descriptions of the two battles, of Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch, and glimpses of Graves's home life prior to his enlistment at McKinney, Texas. Microfilm copy of a typed transcript Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Graves, Rice E.:

CS-+++; im Sommer 1861 Regimentsadjutant 2nd Kentucky Infantry (vgl. Davis: Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 21); im Januar 1862 Batteriechef von Graves's Kentucky Battery; Graves's Battery gehörte bei der Verteidigung von Fort Donelson zu Buckner's Division (vgl. Grant, U. S.: The Opposing Forces at Fort Donelson; in B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 429); Graves's Battery war in der Mitte der Ver­teidigungsfront rechts neben *Maney's Battery (vgl. Wallace, Lew: The Capture of Fort Donelson; in B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 410).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Davis: Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 23, 38-39, 46, 61, 65 ff., 70, 71, 73, 137, 141, 143, 156, 160, 163, 164, 186, 188, 191, 192, 199

- National Archives Washington: Compiled Service Record Rice E. Graves, RG 109

 

 

Graves, W. H.:

US-Col; 12th Michigan Infantry (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 141).

 

Im März 1862 und beim Battle of Shiloh gehörte die 12th Michigan Infantry zur 1st Brigade Col Everett *Peabody 6th Division Bri­Gen Benjamin M. *Prentiss in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 141, 320; Grant: The Opposing Forces at Shiloh, B & L, a.a.O., I, S. 538).

 

 

Graves, William F.:

CS-Major; 2nd Virginia Cavalry (Co F)

 

Photo:

- Scott, Melvin: Photograph and Bible, n.d. 2 items. Resident of Falls Church, Virginia, and collector of Civil War memorabilia. Col­lection consists of two items: an undated photograph of Major William F. Graves of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry, Company F; and a Bi­ble, published in 1864, that evidently originally belonged to a Union soldier but eventually came into the possession of Graves. Wri­ting within the Bible indicates that it might have belonged to William M. Newell, Assistant Surgeon of the 12th Illinois Brigade, 4th Division, serving in Sherman's Army (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Speci­al Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms98-006).

 

 

Gray, Charles H.:

US-Pvt; † 1862; Co C 4th Ohio Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Gray, Charles H. (?-1862): Letter, 1861. 0.1 cu. ft. Soldier in Company C, 4th Ohio Volunteer Regiment. Letter to his brother, July 13-14, 1861, giving an account of his part in the Union advance on Beverly, Virginia (now West Virginia), and a report on the Battle of Rich Mountain. (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms89-028).

 

 


Gray, John Chipman:

US-Major; zunächst 2ndLt Co. H, 3rd Regiment Massachusetts Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 16).

 

Gray was a graduate of Boston Latin School. From there, he went on to Harvard University, where he earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1859, and Harvard Law School, where he earned his law degree in 1861. He was admitted to the bar in 1862, and thereafter served in the Union Army in the American Civil War. He enlisted from Boston as a 2nd Lt. in Company "B", 4th Battalion, Massachusetts Infantry on 27 May 1862, was mustered out a few days later, then was commissioned into Company "H", 3rd Massachusetts Cavalry on 7 October 1862. He left that unit to accept a commission as a Major in the U.S. Volunteers' Adjutant General Department on 25 July 1864. Gray was wounded at the Battle of Opequon (Third Battle of Winchester) on 19 September 1864, and resigned from the Army on 14 July 1865 (vgl. wikipedia, Stichworz: 'John Chipman Gray', Abruf v. 30.3.2017).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Gray, John C. and John Codman Ropes: War Letters of John Chipman Gray and John Codman Ropes (Cambridge, Mass., Riverside Press of the Massachusetts Historical 1927)

 

 

Gray, Josiah:

US-First Sergeant; Co. D, 2nd Regiment US Sharpshooters (Regular Army) (vgl. National Park soldiers M1290 Roll 1); † kia 4.7.1863 Gettysburg/Emmitsburg Road

 

 

Gray, Milton H.:

CS-Commissary Sergeant; Hankins' Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Surry Light Artillery); zuletzt Quartermaster Sergeant der Einheit (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 22); Milton wurde bei den Offizierswahlen der Surry Light Artillery im August 1862 zum Commissary Sergeant ernannt (als Nachfolger des zum 2nd Lieutenant gewählten bisherigen Commissary Sergeant T. J. Berry­man). Gray hatte sich der Surry Light Artillery früh im Jahr 1862 angeschlossen; zuvor war er ab 1861 Sutler (Marketender) in Camp Cook gewesen (vgl. Jones: Under the Stars and Bars: Surry Light Artillery of Virginia, a.a.O., S. 51).

 

 

Gray, Robert H.:

CS-LtCol; im Battle of Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 war Gray Regimentskommandeur der 22nd North Carolina Infantry

 

 

Graybill, John H.:

CS-Capt., 33rd Virginia Infantry, Stonewall Brigade, Jackson's Army of the Valley (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 66, 90); aus dem Dienst entlassen am 23.4.1862; er schloß sich kurz darauf Ashby's Kavallerie an (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 154).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Graybill, John H.: Diary of a Soldier of the Stonewall Brigade (privately printed, Woodstock, Va., ohne Jahresangabe)

 

 

Grayson, G. W.:

Cs-+++; Häuptling der Creek Indianer

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grayson, G. W.: A Creek Warrior for the Confederacy (Univ Oklahoma Press); 182pp; Illustrated; Maps; Biblio; Index. Autobio­graphy of Chief G. W. Grayson; edited by W. David Baird

 

 

Grayson, William J.:

Postmaster in Charleston / SC um 1854; er veröffentlichte in der Presse seines Freundes John Russel politische Gedichte zur Skla­venfrage, wobei er die Stellung der Sklaven derjenigen der Arbeiter in den Fabriken des Nordens gleichsetzte und die nach seiner An­sicht höhere soziale Sicherheit der Sklaven pries (vgl. Nevins: Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, S. 198-99).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grayson, William J. MS Autobiography, ed. by Robert Duncan Bass (South Caroliniana Library)

 

 

Grebe, Belzar:

US-2ndLt; Co. G, 14th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 34, dort wird der Vorname angegeben mit 'Balzer).

 

Grebe stammte aus Deutschland; immigriert in die USA, dann nach Illinois gezogen; in der Vorkriegszeit zeitweise Berufssoldat, da er keine Arbeit finden konnte; 14th Illinois Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Shiloh (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 191).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Grebe, Belzar: Papers (Library of Congress, Washington / DC)

- **Grebe, Belzar: Biography (Shiloh National Military Park, Shiloh / Tennessee: 14th Illinois File)

 

 

Greble, John Trout:

US-Captain; West Point ++++; Vorkriegszeit Lt. 2nd US-Artillerie; Schwiegersohn von West Point Professor John W. *French (vgl. Alexander, Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 44 u. S. 562 Anm. 25); seine Tochter war mit US-Lt John Trout Greble verheiratet (vgl. Alexander, Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 44 und Anm. 25/26 S. 562); Greble war als Capt. 3rd US-Artillery im Battle von Big Bethel eingesetzt (vgl. Alexander, Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 44; nach aA war Greble im Battle of *Big Bethel LtCol der 2nd United States Infantry). Grble gehört zu den "Casualties" des Battle of Big Bethel (vgl. Freeman: Robert E. Lee, a.a.O., 1:528)

 

Photo:

- Milhollen / Kaplan: Divided We Fought, a.a.O., S. 13

 

 

Grebner, Constantin:

Schriftsteller; he was not a menber of the regiment, but wrote in a first-person style as if he were a witness: he used newspapers and documents, but much of his information came from interviews with veteran survivors, years after the war (vgl. Burton, William L.: „We were the Ninth“; in: Indiana Magazine of History, vol. 85, S. 62-63).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grebner, Constantin: We were the Ninth: A History Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, April 17, 1861, to June 7, 1864 (trans. and ed. Frederic Trautmann. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1987)

 

 

 

Greeley, Horace:

einflußreicher Herausgeber der New York Tribune; Republikaner; (vgl. Schurz, Reminiscenses, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 87); er kam als ar­mer Jugendlicher, irischer Abstammung, 1831 nach New York, arbeitete sich in der Presse hoch und kaufte 1841 die New York Tribu­ne zum Preis von 3000 Dollar, von denen er sich 1000 Dollar geleihen (vgl. Andrews: The North Reports the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 9). Greeley setzte sich, neben vielen anderen prominenten Republikanern, bei den Wahlen zum US-Senat in Illinois, bei denen Lincoln 1858 gegen den Demokraten Stephen A. *Douglas kandidierte, dafür ein, daß Lincoln seine Kandidatur zurückziehen und die Repu­blikaner Douglas wegen dessen Haltung in der Sklavenfrage unterstützen sollten (vgl. Schurz, Reminiscenses, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 88). 1860 war Greeley auf dem Republican Wahlkongreß zur Aufstellung des Präsidentschaftskandidaten der Republikaner, ein einflußrei­cher Fürsprecher Lincoln's (vgl. Andrews, a.a.O., S. 10). Persönlicher Gegner von William H. *Seward (vgl. Schurz, Reminiscenses, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 183). Gideon Welles kritisiert die Berichterstattung der New York Tribune vom Frühjahr 1861 hart (vgl. Welles, Dia­ry I S. 51). Greeley nahm zusammen mit James *Holcomb 1864 an einer 'peace conference' in Niagara Falls teil (vgl. Horan: Confe­derate Agent, a.a.O., S. xiii).

 

1864 sprach sich Greeley in einem Leitartikel in seiner New York Tribune vom 13.5.1864 gegen eine erneute Aufstellung durch die Union Party (=Republican Party)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Greeley, Horace: The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States 1860-1864 (Hartford 1864, 1st Editi­on, 2 Volume Set)

- Greeley, Horace: Recollections of a Busy Life (Ford & Co., NY 1869)

- Greeley, Horace: Letter, 1864. 0.1 cu. ft. Newspaper editor (most notably of the 'New York Tribune') and political leader. Best known for his famous phrase "Go west, young man." Collections consists of a one page manuscript letter from Greeley, written Fe­bruary 10, 1864, on Tribune stationery, to Reuben E. Fenton, a U.S. Senator from New York. Greeley asks Fenton to consider Col. L. W. Boadly (?) for the post of Emmissary General of Ordnance, for the war effort. Transcript available. Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide, Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virgi­nia Tech Libraries Ms 94 - 024.

 

 

Green, Allen:

CS-Captain aus Columbia; kommandierte eine Batterie aus Morris Island in 1st Manassas (Ruffin Diary II 56; (Chestnut, Diary, S. 32)

 

 

Green, John „Shac“ Shackleford:

CS-LtCol; Co. F&S, 6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23); Green war zunächst Captain Co. B 6th Virginia Cavalry Regiment.

 

Captain der Rappahannock Cavalry; im Mai 1861 eingesetzt bei Fairfax Court House / VA (vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 124).

 

Zum Gefecht bei Ashby's Gap am 22.9.1862 und zum Tod von Captain Perkins heißt es bei Benedikt (vgl. *Benedict, George Gren­ville. Vermont in the Civil War. Burlington VT: Free Press Association, 1888, S. 576-577): „On the 21st of September, Colonel Price, with a force of cavalry consisting of detachments from the First Vermont and other regiments of his brigade, was sent to cut off a sup­ply train known to be on its way to Lee's army, which was then lying near Martinsburg after the close of the Antietam campaign. The column moved by way of Fairfax Court House to Aldie, where some 200 sick and convalescent Confederates who had been there in hospital since the Second Battle of Bull Run were captured and paroled. Thence it passed on, in the forenoon of the 22d, towards Ash­by's Gap. Two miles beyond Upperville, Preston, who led the advance of Price's column with three small squadrons of the First Vermont, found the way blocked by the enemy. This was a force of 300 men of the Sixth Virginia cavalry, under Lieut. Colonel John S. Green, who had arranged his command in platoons, filling the road, which ran between stone walls, to await attack. Preston was a mile in advance of the main column, and had fewer men with him then those who disputed the passage; but he did not hesitate. Sen­ding two small parties into the fields on right and left as flankers, with the rest, some 60 or 70 in number, he moved up the road at a trot to within 200 or 300 yards of the opposing force, which stood motionless and without firing a shot. Disconcerted by the firm front and absolute silence of the enemy, the front ranks hesitated and the battalion halted. Ordered forward by Preston, it started on and again halted in a crowded mass, when Preston, making a circuit through the field at the side of the road, suddenly leaped the sto­ne fence into the road in front of his men, and, waving his sabre and shouting to them to come on, dashed straight at the force in his front. Three of the company commanders, Captains Erhardt, Perkins and Flint, were near the head of the column and spurred to Pre­ston's side. The men followed, and the little column charged at full speed. When it was fifty feet from his front the Confederate com­mander ordered his men, who were awaiting the onset with leveled revolvers, to fire, and a shower of pistol balls whistled among the Vermonters. But he had reserved his fire too long. The impetus of the charge was too great to be stopped. Preston was wounded. Per­kins fell dead, shot through the head. Erhardt's horse was shot under him and fell partly on him. Lieutenant Adams of company H re­ceived a ball in the chest, and six men were wounded; but before the Virginians could fire another volley the Vermonters were upon them, and went through their ranks with a rush. Lieut. Colonel Green was cut down and captured, with some ugly sabre cuts in his head, and four of his men were killed, 13 wounded and 14 captured. The rest broke and retreated through the Gap. Lieut. Colonel Preston had himself a very narrow escape in the melee. In the rush of the charge he passed through the enemy's rear rank, and when they turned in flight they carried him with them, wedged in between two of their number, each of whom drew his pistol on him. He managed to knock one of the revolvers and disabled its owner with a back-handed blow with the hilt of his sabre. The other's shot passed through his right arm. Another ball grazed his stomach; but he extracted himself and joined his men, and, though faint from the loss of blood, retained command till Price came up with the main body“.

 

Green was born on June 9, 1817, in Rappahannock County, Virginia and became a farmer. In response to the April 14, 1861, surren­der at Fort Sumter, President Lincoln raised the call for 75,000 volunteers to put down the southern rebellion. In turn, Green enlisted in the Confederacy on April 22, 1861. After the formation of the 6th Virginia Cavalry, he became a Captain in Company B. Green was promoted to Major, April 30, 1862 and to Lt. Colonel on July 16, 1862. He served as a commanding officer in the field with Thomas Flournoy, a former United States Congressman and unsuccessful candidate for Virginia Governor. Green became a Prisoner of War and was paroled on September 22, 1862. He was acquitted by court-martial of disobedience of orders and breach of arrest on September 17, 1863. Green resigned on April 23, 1864 for the good of the service. On this General Jeb Stuart wrote that Green "de­serves credit for his patriotism. The service will be benefitted beyond a doubt by its acceptance." His resignation was recorded as of May 19, 1864 (aus http://civilwartalk.com/threads/confederate-col-john-s-green.88283).

 

Photo:

Col. John S. Green (vgl. http://www.amazon.com/Photo-Civil-War-John-Green/dp/B007RQ59TW)

 

 

Green, John W. „Johnny“:

CS-Sergeant Major; zunächst Pvt, Co. B, 9th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry, zuletzt Sergeant Major, Co. F&S, 9th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5; vgl. Davis: Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 264).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Davis, William C.: The Orphan Brigade, a.a.O., S. 35-35 usw.

- **Kirwan, Albert Dennis (ed.): „Johnny Green of the Orphan Brigade: The Journal of a Confederate Soldier (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1956)

 

 

Green, Jonathan:

CS-Pvt; 21st Virginia Infantry; Teilnahme an Jackson's Expedition nach Bath und Romney Ende Dezember 1861 / Anfang Januar 1862 (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 88); Green gehörte später zur Rockbridge Artillery

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Green, Jonathan: Unpublished wartime letters of Jonathan Green, a member of the 21st Virginia Infantry and later the Rockbridge Artillery, scattered dates (Duke University Manuscript Collection, Durham / North Carolina

 

 

Green, Josua:

Inhaber einer Cotton-Factory in Jackson / Miss. Sherman, Memoirs I S. 349 erwähnt den Befehl Grant's, in Jackson auch die Cotton-Factory zu zerstören. Josua Green (Confederate Veteran Vol. I March 1893, S. 76) erwähnt seinen erfolglosen Besuch bei Sherman, der um Mitternacht gegenüber Green angab, der Befehl werde nicht ausgeführt und die Fabrik verschont. Einige Stunden später war die Fabrik niedergebrannt.

 

 

Green, Tom:

CS-Colonel; Vorkriegszeit: prominenter Texas Hero und Politiker; Col. 5th Texas Mounted Volunteers; Sibley's Brigade während Si­bley's New Mexico and Arizona Campaign 1861-62; stellv. Brigadekommandeur von Sibley's Brigade (Alberts, Battle of Glorieta, a.a.O., S. 11).

 

 

Greene, Albert R.:

++-++; Einsatz an der Frontier

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Greene, Albert R.: From Bridgeport to Ringgold by Way of Lookout Mountain (Providence / Rhode Island, 1870)

- Greene, Albert R.: "What I Saw of the Quantrill Raid." Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1903-1904, VIII, S. 13-49

- Greene, Albert R.: "Campaigning in the Army of the Frontier." Collections of the Kansas State Historical Society,, 1915-1918, XIV, S. 283-310

 

 

Greene, Benjamin H.:

CS-Major; aus Mississippi; im Frühjahr 1862 war Greene Chief of Commissary Department in Ewell's Division (vgl. Pfanz: Ewell, a.a.O., S. 155).

 

 

Greene, Colton:

CS-BrigGen; geboren Juli 1832 in South Carolina (sein Grabstein gibt nur das Geburtsjahr an, während der Census von 1900 für Shelby County, Tenn. [Census von 1900 Shelby County, Microfilm ED 67, Sheet 6] Juli 1832 angibt [vgl. Allardice: More Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 105, Anm. 1]); Schreibweise teilweise 'Green' (so bei Boatner, a.a.O., S. 355), sein Name lautete möglicherweise George Colton Greene (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 105 Anm. 1; Duke: Basil W.:Reminiscenses, a.a.O., S. 37); Greene zog vor 1857 nach St. Louis, Mo., wo er sich aktiv für die Demokratische Partei einsetzte; 1857 führte er von St. Louis aus eine intensive politi­sche Korrespondenz mit einem Abgeordneten im US-Congress und war 1860 Vorsitzender des Missouri Committees 'Breckenridge for President' (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 105 Anm. 1); erfolgreicher Kaufmann und 1860 Teilhaber der Firma Hoyt & Co in St. Louis; die Firma war in der Wholesale Grocery Business tätig (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104 und 105 Anm. 1); bereits das St. Louis Directo­ry für 1854-55 führt einen George C. Greene als Mitarbeiter der Firma Hoyt & Co. auf (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 105 Anm. 1); vor Kriegsausbruch war Greene zusammen mit Basil W. *Duke einer der militärischen Führer der pro-sezessionistischen Missouri Minu­te Men in St. Louis (vgl. Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 33, 43; Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104). 1861 CS-Captain der Missouri Miliz (Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 95; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 355); im Frühling 1861 war Greene Mitglied von Missouri-Governor Clai­borne Jackson's geheimem Strategy Board, wo alle Aktivitäten der Missouri Sezessionisten koordiniert wurden (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104); Greene war von Governor Jackson beauftragt worden, gegen die Bedrohung der US-Kräfte unter Lyon in Missouri Hilfe der CSA zu holen (vgl. Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 81); Greene suchte deshalb 1861 wiederholt Jefferson Davis auf (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104), Greene war deshalb in Arkansas bei Benjamin McCulloch (vgl. Brooksher, Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 95; All­ardice, a.a.O., S. 104). Im Battle von Wilson's Creek am 10.8.1861 diente Greene im Stab von BrigGen James McBride, des Kom­mandeurs des 7th Military District von Missouri; 28.10.1861 zum CS-Col befördert und Assistant Adjutant General im 7th Military District von Missouri; nach dem Rücktritt von BrigGen McBride im Frühjahr 1862 übernahm Greene die Truppen des 7th Military Districts die er in eine Infantrie Brigade mit 2 Regimentern reoganisierte (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104), die 3rd Missouri Brigade (vgl. Shea/Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 23); Teilnahme am Battle von Pea Ridge am 7.-8.3.1862 (vgl. Shea/Hess, Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 176; Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104); Greene war mit seiner Brigade beim Einsatz von General Sterling Price's Missouri Army in Mississip­pi beteiligt. Im Sommer 1862 kehrte Greene nach Missouri zurück, um ein Regiment Cavalry aufzustellen, die 3rd Missouri Cavalry, zu dessen Col er am 4.11.1862 ernannt wurde (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104); dieses Regiment wurde in Mississippi eingesetzt und war 'dismounted' (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., Vol. I, S. 48 Anm. 21; OR Ser. I, Vol. XVII, pt. II, S. 741). Teilnahme am Battle von Helena, Ark. am 4.7.1863, wo er die Brigade der Missouri Cavalry in Marmaduke's Division führte, zu der die 3rd Missouri Cavalry gehörte (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 355; Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104). 1864 Teilnahme an der Camden Expedition (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104); Greene führte die Cavalry Brigade auch in den Gefechten von Poison Spring, Arkansas, April 18, 1864 und Jenkin's Ferry. Im Sommer 1864 fand gegen Greene ein Kriegsgerichtsverfahren statt, weil er entgegen einem Befehl sich weigerte, die Mulis seiner Brigade an die CS-Regierung abzuliefern, wurde jedoch freigesprochen (vgl. Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104). Greene zum BrigGen im Trans-Mississippi-Department (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 355). Greene ist als BrigGen aufgeführt bei Wright (Wright, Marcus J.: comp. General Officers of the Confederate Army (New York, 1911), SHSP, Heitman, Jones (Jones, Charles E.: "General Officers of the Re­gular C.S. Army," Confederate Veteran, XVI [1908], S. 45-48). Obwohl er mehrfach eine Brigade führte, wird Greene in OR als Col bezeichnet, letztmals am 31.12.1864 und ein Kriegsbericht führt ihn am 27.3.1865 als Col. Governor Reynolds von Missouri (der Greene aus der Vorkriegszeit kannte), fordert in einem Brief an Kirby Smith Greene's Beförderung zum BrigGen (Brief von Thomas C. Reynolds an E. Kirby Smith vom 27.3.1865, in: Reynolds Papers, Library of Congress). Greene wird als sehr fähiger Offizier be­schrieben, "no braver or better officer ever drew a sword" (vgl. Edwards, John N.: Shelby and His Men [Cincinnati, 1867], S. 251). In der Nachkriegszeit lebte Greene in Memphis. Seine Firma in St. Louis hatte Greene's Partner Hoyt, ein strammer Unionist (der Mayor von New Orleans wurde) bereits bald nach Kriegsausbruch an sich gerissen. Greene war zunächst verarmt und arbeitete des­halb in der Versicherungsbranche. 1871 gründete Greene seine eigene Versicherungsgesellschaft, sowie bald darauf die State Savings Bank von Memphis. Greene wurde erneut wohlhabend, unternahm Reisen nach Europa (vgl. McIlwaine, Shields: Memphis down in Dixie [New York, 1948], S. 236). Greene starb am 23.9.1900 und ist auf dem Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis beerdigt (Allardice, a.a.O., S. 105).

 

Photos:

- Allardice, a.a.O., S. 104 (Gemälde); Allardice weist auf die Ähnlichkeit Greene's mit Josef Stalin hin

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Allardice: More Generals in Grey, a.a.O., S. 104-105

- Boatner, Mark M.: Civil War Dictionary, a.a.O., S. 355

- Brooksher, William Riley: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 33, 42, 43, 78, 81, 95, 101-02

- Census von 1900 Shelby County, Microfilm ED 67, Sheet 6] Juli 1832

- Edwards, John N.: Shelby and His Men (Cincinnati, 1867), S. 251

- Greene, Colton: Colton Greene Collection, Memphis/Shelby County Public Library, Memphis

- Greene, Colton: Briefe vom 29.5.1882 und 10.6.1882 an Thomas Snead; in: Thomas L. Snead Papers, Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis

- Heitman, Francis B.: Historical Register of the United States Army, from Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to September 29, 1889. 2 vols (Washington, 1890)

- Jones, Charles E.: "General Officers of the Regular C.S. Army," Confederate Veteran, XVI (1908), S. 45-48

- Jones, Charles E.: "A Roster of General Officers, Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives Military Organizations, &c., in Confederate Service During the War Between the States," Southern Historical Society Papers, vols. I and II [printed as vols. Ia und IIa: 1876-77

- McIlwaine, Shields: Memphis down in Dixie (New York, 1948], S. 236

- Memphis Commercial Appeal, Ausgaben vom 2., 5., und 7. Oktober 1900

- Reynolds, Thomas C.: Brief von Thomas C. Reynolds an E. Kirby Smith vom 27.3.1865, in: Reynolds Papers, Library of Congress

- Shea/Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 23, 176

- Wright, Marcus J.: comp. General Officers of the Confederate Army (New York, 1911)

 

 

Greene, George S.:

US-BrigGen; XII Army Corps in Gettysburg (vgl. Dawes, Service with the Sixth Wisconsin, a.a.O., S. 181; vgl. Sauers: Gettysburg. The Meade-Sickles Controversy, a.a.O., S. 44). Commanding the Third Bri­gade, Geary's division; when Geary moved his division to Little Round Top early on 2.7.1863. Gree­ne's brigade was left to hold Culp's Hill. It resisted strong Confederate attacks during the day, being driven off finally late in the eve­ning (vgl. Stackpole: They Met at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 242; vgl. Sauers: Gettysburg. The Meade-Sickles Controversy, a.a.O., S. 41).

 

Photo:

MajGen George S. Greene (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_S._Greene#/media/File:George_S._Greene.jpg)

 

 

Greene, Henderson P.:

CS-+++; Greene nahm an der Pea Ridge Campaign vom Frühjahr 1862 teil und erlebte McCulloch's Eintreffen bei seiner Division bei Cross Hollows (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 46 Anm. 4). Greene schildert den Vormarsch der CS-Truppen nach Pea Ridge, der im starken Schneefall und mit hoher Marschgeschwindigkeit erfolgte (vgl. Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 351 Anm. 4).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Jines, Billie, ed. "Civil War Diary of Henderson P. Greene." Washington County (Ark.) Historical Society Flash book 17 (1967); en­hält u.a. Battle of Pea Ridge (S. 15-18)

 

 

Greene, Robert Cochrane:

CS-Captain, 21st Mississippi Infantry (vgl. Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 67).

 

 

Greene, William B.:

US-Pvt; Co. G, 2nd Regiment US-Sharpshooters (Regular Army) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M1290 Roll 1); Berdan's Sharpshooters; Greene, from New Hampshire, served in Co. "G" of the 2nd US Sharpshooters

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Greene, William B. (Berdan's Sharpshooters): Letters from a Sharpshooter: The Civil War Letters of Private William B. Greene (University Press of Virginia; Belleville: Historic Pub, 1993). Greene, from New Hampshire, served in Co. "G" of the 2nd US Sharpshooters. These letters, edited by William Hastings, include details of battles, and photos.

 

 

Greenfield, Andrew J.:

US-Captain; 'Washington Cavalry', Sektion der 1st Squadron Pennsylvania Cavalry (Captain John *Keys); die Washington Cavalry gehörte im Frühjahr 1862 zum Cavalry Corps 5th Army Corps Banks (Col *Broadhead); Teilnahme am Battle of Kernstown am 23.3.1862 (vgl. Keys Report OR 12 [I] 357; Greenfield's Report OR 12 [I] 358).

 

 

Greenhow, Rose O'Neal ("Wild Rose"):

CS-Spionin und Führerin eines Spionagerings in Washington, den sie zusammen mit Thomas *Jordan aufgebaut hatte (vgl. Markle: Spies, a.a.O., S. 2) in Washington, *1817 Montgomery County / MD - 1864; in der Vorkriegszeit möglicherweise insgeheim im Dienst des State Departments (vgl. Tidwell, a.a.O., S. 59; Wriston, a.a.O., S. 835); sie stammte aus einer reichen Planter-Familie; wohlhabende Witwe mit besten Beziehungen zur guten Gesellschaft, Behörden und Ministerien in Washington; Greenhow war mit dem früheren Präsidenten James Buchanan und Secretary of State William Henry Seward befreundet und betrieb in ihrem Haus in Washington, Nr. 398 16th Street, einen Steinwurf von Weißen Haus entfernt, einen CS-Spionagering; der Aufbau erfolgte in Zu­sammenarbeit mit dem damaligen US-Offizier Capt. Thomas Jordan (Markle: Spies, a.a.O., S. 2; Tidwell: Confederate Covert Ac­tion, a.a.O., S. 59 ff), der bei Kriegsbeginn in Washington stationiert war und sich bald der CSA anschloß, wo er bei 1st Manassas Stabsof­fizier und Adjutant General Beauregard's war (vgl. Alexander: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 38); Pinkerton, er­wähnt einen US-Captain 'Ellison' unter einem Alias-Namen, bei dem er sich um Captain John Elwood (5th US Infantry) handeln dürfte und deutet eine Liebesbeziehung an (vgl. Pinkerton, Allan: The Founder of the Pinkertons shadows a beautiful Rebel Spy; in: Van Doren Stern: Secret Missions of the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 60; Tidwell, a.a.O., S. 57; zur sexuellen Attraktivität Greenhow's vgl. auch: Brief von Confederate Secretary of the Navy Stephen R. Mallory an Mrs. Clement Clay vom 28.10.1864 in Clement C. Clay Manuscripts, Wil­liam R. Perkins Libraryher a dept it can never pay. She warned them at Manassas, and so get Joe Johnston and his Paladins to appear upon the stage in the very nick of time." (vgl. Chestnut, A Diary from Dixie, a.a.O., S. 176).

 

Die Übermittlung der Spionage-Ergebnisse von Washington ins CS-Hauptquartier von CS-BrigGen Bonham erfolgte durch Miss Bet­ty Duvall (vgl. Farwell, Byron: Ball's Bluff - A small Battle and Its Long Shadow, a.a.O., S. 26; Markle: Spies, a.a.O., S. 19), Lillie MacKall, beide aus Washington, und Antonia Ford aus Manassas (vgl. Markle: Spies, a.a.O., S. 19). Der Erfolg der Konföderierten bei 1st Bull Run ist u.a. auf diese Informationen zurückzuführen.

 

Sie rief in Washington eine Spionagegruppe mit mehreren Mitgliedern ins Leben. Trotz der Verhaftung von Greenhow und mehrerer anderer Mitglieder bestand die Gruppe während fast des gesamten Krieges, und versah ihre Aufgabe, die CS-Army of Northern Vir­ginia mit militärischen Informationen zu versehen (vgl. Tidwell, April 65 - Confederate Covert Action, a.a.O., S. 32)

 

Greenhow wird am 23.8.1861 nach der Festnahme *Captain Elwood's festgenommen und unter Hausarrest in ihrem eigenen Haus in Washington DC gestellt, setzte jedoch auch dann ihre Tätigkeit fort. Greenhow wird daraufhin im Old Capitol Prison in Washington inhaftiert und später in den Süden deportiert, wo sie sich nicht lange aufhält, sondern nach London reist, um ihre Tätigkeit für die Konföderation fortzusetzen und ihre Memoiren zu schreiben. Von dort kehrt sie 1864 mit wichtigen Informationen auf dem Blocka­debrecher "CSS Condor" in den Süden zurück; dieser wird im schweren Sturm gejagt, rammt einen Felsen wobei der Kiel zerbricht und sinkt vor der Küste bei Wilmington. Greenhow läßt sich trotz Sturm und hoher See mit einem kleinen Boot von Schiff zur Küste bei Wilmington bringen, wobei sie ertrinkt, unmittelbar vor der Küste, in die Tiefe gezogen von den Goldschatz, den sie in ihren Kleidern verborgen hatte (vgl. Hoehling, Damn the Torpedos, a.a.O., S. 7). Zeuge ihres Todes wird James *Holcombe. Dieser hatte zusammen mit Horace *Greeley an einer 'peace conference' in Niagara Falls teilgenommen. Auf der Rückfahrt mit dem Blockadebre­cher, auf dem sich Rose O'Neal *Greenhow befand, rettete sich Holcombe zusammen mit Greenhow u.a. in ein Rettungsboot, das im Seegang umschlug. Greenhow ertrank, Holcombe wurde Zeuge ihres Todes (vgl. Horan: Confederate Agent, a.a.O., S. xiii).

 

Photo:

- Davis: Battle of Bull Run, a.a.O., nach S. 106

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Greenhow, Rose O'Neal: My Imprisonment and the First Year of Abolition Rule in Washington (London: Richard Bently, 1863)

- Greenhow, Rose O'Neal: Diary 5.8.1863-10.8.1864; North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh / NC

- Greenhow, Rose O'Neal: Rose O'Neal Greenhow Papers, Special Collections Library, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik17b

- Halacy, Dan: The Master Spy (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1968)

- Kinchen, Oscar A.: Women Who Spied for the Blue and the Gray (Philadelphia: Dorrance & Company, 1972)

- Mahoney, M. H.: Women in Espionage, A Bibliographical Dictionary (Santa Barbara, California: ABC-Clio, 1993)

- Pinkerton, Allan: The Spy of the Rebellion, 1883 (zu Rose O'Neal Greenhow)

- Pinkerton, Allan: The Founder of the Pinkertons shadows a beautiful Rebel Spy; in: Van Doren Stern: Secret Missions of the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 54 ff

- Records Concerning the Conduct and Loyalty of Army Officers, War Department Employees, and Citizens during the Civil War, box 1, Rg 107 (enthält auch Reports written by Rose Greenhow and turned over to the War Department by Allen Pinkerton, vgl. Tid­well, a.a.O., S. 228 Anm. 10)

- Ross, Ishbel: Rebel Rose - Rose O'Neal Greenhow Confederate Spy -Harpers - N.Y. 1954 (1) 1st/DJ - 16 Pages of Illustrations

- Sigaud, Louis A.: "Mrs. Greenhow and the Rebel Spy Ring," Maryland Historical Magazine, XLI (September 1946), S. 173

- Tidwell, William A.: April 65 - Confederate Covert Action in the American Civil War, The Kent State University Press (Kent, Ohio & London, England, 1995), Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik17e, S. 32; 57-76

- Wriston, Henry Merritt: Executive Agents in American Foreign Relations (Gloucester, Mass.: Peter Smith, 1967), S. 835

 

 

Greenley, T. J.:

CS-Pvt; Co D 27th Arkansas Infantry; ab 1863 Attendant at the military hospital at St. John's College in Little Rock (Pulaski County) / Arkansas bis zur capture of the city by Union troops and Greenlee's subsequent imprisonment at the Little Rock penitentiary. Green­lee was later transferred to a prison at Johnson's Island, Ohio, where he remained until the end of the war. Greenley war verheiratet mit Josephene B. Crumb

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Crumb, Josephene B.: Papers and journal, 1894-1920 (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990)

 

 

Greeno, H. S.:

US-Captain, 6th Kansas Cavalry. Greeno nahm den früheren Captain der 7th Kansas Cavalry (Jennison's Jayhawkers) Marshall *Cle­veland am 10.5.1862 in Osawatomie fest und erschoß diesen bei einem Fluchtversuch (vgl. Starr, Jennison's Jayhawkers, a.a.O., S. 25-26; Greeno, H. S.: Greeno's Report OR XIII S, 377-78).

 

 

Greer, Elkanah B.:

CS-Col, 1861 Regimentskommandeur 3rd Texas Cavalry; Greer war State Commander der *Knights of the Golden Circle (vgl. Hale: Third Texas Cavalry, a.a.O., S. 15). Greer war der Sohn eines reichen Landspekulanten, geboren in Tennessee und aufgewachsen in Holly Springs / Ms, diente Greer während des Mexiko-Krieges im Regiment von Jefferson Davis. Greer zog 1851 nach Marshall / Tx, dem ökonomischen Zentrum in Ost-Texas und heiratete dort in den bekannten Holcombe Clan. Er kandidierte wiederholt als glü­hender Sezessionist für öffentliche Ämter. Als Delegierter nahm Greer 1860 am Wahlkongreß der Demokratischen Partei (*Charle­ston Convention) teil (Hale: Third Texas Cavalry, a.a.O., S. 26/27). Im Frühjahr 1862 während der PeaRidge Campaign gehörte die 3rd Texas Cavalry zu BrigGen James M. *McIntosh's Cavalry Brigade in Benjamin *McCulloch's Division, Van Dorn's Army of the West (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 335).

 

Greer war wohlhabend und besaß wie alle frühen Offiziere aus Texas Sklaven (vgl. Hale, a.a.O., S. 28/29), während nur ein Viertel aller Haushalte Sklaveneigner waren.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Hale: Third Texas Cavalry, a.a.O.,

- Johnson, Sid S.: Texans who ware the Gray (Tyler, Tex, 1907)

- Warner, Ezra J: "Generals in Gray," a.a.O., S. 118

 

 

Gregg, David McMurtrie:

US-BrigGen (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 357); im April/Mai 1863 während der Chancellorsville Campaign Teilnahme an Stoneman's raid auf Richmond. Hierbei sollte MajGen Averell mit seiner 2nd Cavalry Division auf Culpeper Court House vorstoßen, während Stone­man mit 3 Cavalry Brigaden unter BrigGen David M. *Gregg über Stevensburg (einem Weiler 7 Meilen östlich von Culpeper Court House) vorgehen sollte (vgl. Battles and Leaders III, S. 152).

 

When in mid-May 1863, Lee began to concentrate cavalry in the Culpeper area, Hooker countered by moving BrigGen David M. Gregg's cavalry division opposite Stuart, near Bealeton (vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 28; vgl. OR XXV, Pt. 2, p. 480).

 

1863 während der Gettysburg Campaign war Gregg Divisionskommandeur der 2nd Ca­valry Division, in Pleasonton's Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. Er befehligte beim Battle of Brandy Station am 9.6.1863 den rechten US-Angriffsflügel, bestehend aus der 2nd Cavalry Division unter der Führung von Col Alfred N. Duffie, 3rd Cavalry Divisi­on und BrigGen David A. Russel's Infanterie­brigade (vgl. Coddington: The Gettysburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 55; vgl. Longacre: Cavalry at Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 62).

 

Im Battle of Gettysburg löste Pleasonton am 2.7.1863 die vor der linken Flanke der US-Front an der Emmitsburg Road eingesetzte Cavalry Buford's ab (to refit), frerwnahm diese hinter die Front zurück und setzte sie zur Bewachung von Versorgungstransporten ein. Pleasonton versäumte es hierbei, für Ersatz zu sorgen, so daß die linke Flanke von Sickles's III. Corps ungeschützt war: OB Mea­de erhielt erst am Nachmittag Kenntnis von Pleasonton's Fehler, und gab nun Anweisung ein Regiment von David McMurtrie Greg­g's Cavalry Division dort einzuset­zen. Dieses erreichte den Einsatzort jedoch nicht mehr vor Beginn des CS-Angriffs auf Little Round Top (vgl. Sauers: Gettysburg. The Meade-Sickles Controversy, a.a.O., S. 41).The identity of the regiment from Gregg's command has neben been ascertained (vgl. Sauers: Gettysburg. The Meade-Sickles Controversy, a.a.O., S. 169n39).

 

1864 im Stab Sheridan's während der Valley Campaign

 

Photo:

- Davis / Wiley: Photographic History. Vol: 2: Vicksburg to Appomattox, a.a.O., S. 327 (im Stab Sheridan's während der Valley Cam­paign)

- Library of Congress, Washington/DC: MajGen David M. Gregg

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Sickles, Daniel E., D. McM. Gregg, John Newton and Daniel Butterfield: „Further Recollections of Gettysburg“. North American Review, vol. 152, no. 412 (March 1891)

 

 

Gregg, John:

CS-BrigGen; 1828-1864; aus Alabama, zog dann nach Texas; nach Abschluß des College zunächst Lehrer, später Rechtsanwalt und District Judge. Mitglied der Texas Secession Convention; State Representative von Texas bei der CSA-Regierung in Montgomery; Abgeordneter im CS-Congress bis zu seiner Ernennung zum Col; September 1861 Col 7th Texas Infantry; eingesetzt bei Fort Donel­son, Übergabe von Fort Donelson und in Kriegsgefangenschaft (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 357; B & L Vol. I S. 429). Gregg wurde aus­getauscht und zum BrigGen befördert am 29.8.1862: Briarss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 149). Anschließend in Chickamau­ga eingesetzt, dort verwundet. Nach seiner Gesundung übernahm Gregg das Kommando über Hood's Texas Brigade und diente unter Longstreet in Virginia. Battles von Wilderness, Spotsylvania und Petersburg. Gregg ist am 7. Oktober 1864 bei Darbytown gefallen, nachdem er fast fünf Monate ununterbrochen im Gefecht war (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 357).

 

Im Battle of the Wilderness wurde die Texas-Brigade kommandiert von BrigGen John *Gregg und bestand aus folgenden Regimen­tern:

1st, 4th, and 5th Texas Infantry Regiments und 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

At first the Federals seemed to sustain the advance of the Confederate troops, scattering BrigGen John Gregg's Texas Brigade, but BrigGen Henry Benning's Georgians plunged into the contest, followed by BrigGen McIver Law's Brigade od Alabamians. The latter tossed Hancock's US-Corps into greater confusion (vgl. Mahood: General Wadsworth, a.a.O., S. 2).

 

 

Gregg, Lafayette:

US-Col; 4th Regiment Arkansas Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M393 Roll 2).

 

Lafayette Gregg (1825-1891) was an attorney, soldier, Arkansas Supreme Court justice, presi­dent of the Bank of Fayetteville, and one of the founding fathers of the Arkansas Industrial University (University of Arkansas).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gregg Family. Papers, 1853-1983; 2 linear feet. Family correspondence, legal files, and photographs pertaining to the Lafayette Gregg family of Fayetteville (Washington County). Lafayette Gregg (1825-1891) was an attorney, soldier, Arkansas Supreme Court justice, president of the Bank of Fayetteville, and one of the founding fathers of the Arkansas Industrial University (University of Ar­kansas). Most of the materials in this collection pertain to Lafayette's descendents in the early twentieth century, but a small group of records concern his service as colonel commanding the Fourth Arkansas Cavalry (Union). These records include the following: a medical statement dated January 1863, exempting Lafayette from service in the local militia; a travel pass and bond issued to Lafa­yette for a trip to Little Rock (Pulaski County) to consult with Governor Harris *Flanagin in May 1863; two orders pertaining to the Fourth Arkansas Cavalry and its operations around Little Rock; and an official discharge certificate issued to Lafayette Gregg in June 1865 (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville: Manuscript Resources for the Civil War, Compiled by Kim Allen Scott, 1990).

 

 

Gregg, Maxcy:

CS-BrigGen; 1814-1862; Politiker und Rechtsanwalt aus Columbia / SC; Gregg war ein gebildeter Mann, belesen insb. in griechi­scher Klassik und Philosophie, Botanik, Ornithologie und Astrologie; Mitglied der South Carolina Secession Convention; im Dez. 1860 bis Februar 1861 stellte Gregg die 1st South Carolina Infantry auf, zu deren Colonel er gewählt wurde (vgl. Längin S. 44; Ben­son, Susan (Hrsg.): Berry Benson’s Civil War Book. Memoirs of a Confederate Scout and Sharpshooter, Reprint 1992, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik6 S. 2; Ruffin, Diary II 102); 14.12.1861 BrigGen Gregg's Brigade; Teilnahme an Jackson's Vorstoß gegen Pope's Army of Virginia Anfang August 1862 (vgl. Krick: Cedar Mountain, a.a.O., S. 42; Benson, Berry: Civil War Book, Memoirs of a Confederate Scout and Sharpshooter a.a.O., S. 16); Maxcy Gregg's Brigade kam jedoch während der Schlacht von Cedar Mountain am 9.8.1862 nicht zum Einsatz, sondern war als Reserve zur Bewachung des Wagon Train abgestellt (vgl. Caldwell: History of a Brigade of South Carolinas known first as 'Gregg's', a.a.O., S. 26). Gregg wurde tödlich verwundet durch Gewehrschuß that lodged near his spine bei Fredericksburg am 13.12.1862 († 15.12.1862), als er versuchte, Meade's An­griff und einen bevorstehenden Durchbruch durch die Front von A. P. Hill's Division in Jackson's Corps zu stoppen (vgl. Alexander: Fighting for the Confederacy, a.a.O., S. 174; Alexan­der: Military Memoir, a.a.O., S. 299; Rable, George C.: It is well, that War is so terrible; in: Gallagher, Gary W. (ed.): The Fredericks­burg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 48), bzw. mit seinem Truppen eine Lücke zwischen den Brigaden James J. Archer und James H. Lane ge­gen die angreifende Division von George H. Meade schließen wollte (vgl. Gal­lagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 48; Alexander: Military Memoir, a.a.O., S. 299).

 

Photo:

- Rable, George C.: It is well, that War is so terrible; in: Gallagher, Gary W. (ed.): The Fredericksburg Campaign, a.a.O., S. 49

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Caldwell, J.F.J.: The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians known first as "Gregg's," and subsequently as "McGowan's Briga­de." (King & Baird Printers: Philadelphia, 1866; Reprint Morningside Bookshop); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik94

- Chestnut, Diary, S. 31

- Freeman, Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., vol. 2, S. 374-76

- Gregg, Maxcy: Papers, South Carolina Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC.

- Krick, Robert K.: "Maxcy Gregg: Political Extremist and Confederate General"; in: Civil War History 19 (December 1973), S. 293-313

- Official Report, vol. 21, S. 1067 (Lee an South Carolina Governor Francis Pickens

- Palmer, Benjamin Morgan (Reverend): Adress delivered at the Funeral of General Maxcy Gregg in the Presbyterian Church, Co­lumbia SC., December 20, 1862 (Columbia SC: Southern Guardian Steam-Power Press, 1863), S. 3-11

- Smith, James Power: "With Stonewall Jackson in the Army of Northern Virginia, SHSP, vol 43, S. 34

 

 

Gregory, Edward M.:

US-Col; Regimentskommandeur 91st Pennsylvania Infantry. Das Regiment gehörte seit Frühjahr 1862 zur Brigade von BrigGen Erast­us Barnard Tyler, und seit Herbst 1862 zur Division von BrigGen Andrew Atchinson Humphreys; Teilnahme am Angriff auf den Stonewall im Battle von Fredericksburg (vgl. Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 83).

 

 

Grenfell, George St. Leger:

CS-Col; 1808-+++; stammte aus Großbritannien; Grenfell kam 1862 von England in die CSA um für die Konföderation zu kämpfen. Grenfell wurde von John H. *Morgan im 1862 zum ADG von Morgan's Cavalry ernannt (vgl. Horwitz: Longest Raid, a.a.O., S. 3); dann als LtCol in Bragg's Army of Tennessee, anschließend Assistant Inspector General in JEB Stuart's Cavalry Corps Army of Nor­thern Virginia (vgl. Starr: Colonel Grenfell's Wars, a.a.O., S. 5); schließlich Col 2nd Kentucky Cavalry ?+++; am 27.3.1863 auf Be­fehl von Gen. Bragg (damals Befehlshaber der Army of Tennessee) zum Stab von MajGen Wheeler, dem Chef der Cavalry der Army of Tennessee befohlen (Horwitz, a.a.O., S. 3). 1865 in Chicago angeklagt als einer der "Chicago Conspirators" zusammen mit George St. Leger *Grenfell und Charles Walsh (vgl. Starr: Colonel Grenfell's Wars, a.a.O., S. 4).

 

Photo:

- Horan: Confederate Agent, a.a.O., S. 5

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Fremantle, LtCol Arthur James Lyon: Three Month in the Southern States (New York: n. p., 1864; reprint: University of Nebrasca Press: Lincoln and London, 1991); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik 85, S. 148-150, 152, 158-59, 165, 163-64, 212

- Lonn, Ella: Foreigners in the Union Army and Navy. Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge (Chapel Hill, 1940)

Grenfell, George St. Leger: Letter to John Hunt Morgan vom 30.5.1864, in: Morgan, John Hunt: Morgan Papers, Southern Historical Collection. University of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill

- Grenfell Papers: RG 109, War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Generals und Staff Officers, File of G. St. Leger Grenfell (National Archives Washington / DC)

- Mosgrove, George D. (Pvt. 4th Kentucky Cavalry [CS]): Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie: Reminiscenses of a Confederate Cavalryman (McCo­wat Mercer, 1957; Reprint of 1895 Original edited by Bell Wiley)

- Overley, Milford: "Old St. Leger," Confederate Veteran VIII (1905), S. 80-81

- Starr, Stephen: Col Grenfell's Wars (1971)

 

 

Gresham, Walter Quintin (Quintus):

US-MajGen; aus Indiana; Republikaner; Mitglied des Indiana Parlaments 1860; Gresham verstand sich persönlich nicht gut mit Go­vernor Morton; als er sich 1861 um Offiziersstelle bewarb, wurde er von Governor Morton abgelehnt; Gresham verpflichtete sich dar­aufhin als Pvt; wurde kurze Zeit später zum Captain seiner Company gewählt, am 18. 9.1861 LtCol 38th Indiana Infantry; am 10.3.1862 Col 53rd Indiana Infantry (vgl. Thornbrough: Indiana in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 130; Boatner, a.a.O., S. 358).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gresham, Mathilda: The Life of Walter Quintin Gresham (2 vols. Chicago, 1919)

 

 

Greusel, Nicholas H.:

US-Col; Brigadekommandeur 2nd Brigade und gleichzeitig Regimentskommandeur 36th Illinois Infantry (Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 331), Detachments der 36th Illinois Infantry wurden detachiert zu Philip H. Sheridan's Versorgungstruppen (vgl. Sheridan: Personal Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 71). 1st Division Gen. *Osterhaus im Battle of Pea Ridge; dort Teilnahme an der bewaffneten Aufklärung über Leetown nach Twelf Corner Church (Shea / Hess, S. 90; Karte bei Shea / Hess S. 92). Am 7.3.1862 verteidigte die Brigade Greusel bei Oberson's Field (vgl. Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 90-113 mit Karte S. 108).

 

Photo:

- Shea / Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 106

 

 

Grier, D. P.:

US-Col; Regimentskommandeur 77th Illinois Infantry, 10th Division Andrew J. Smith, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Campaign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 402). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 402).

 

 

Grier, Robert Cooper:

US-Richter; aus Pennsylvania; Richter am US-Supreme Court; Richter im Dred *Scott Case und Vorsitz von Richter *Taney; Grier hatte südstaatliche Sympathien (vgl. Nevins, The Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 101). Grier war ein entfernter Verwandter von Alexander H. Stephens; sein Schwiegersohn, der aus Kentucky stammte, war im Bürgerkrieg CS-Offizier (vgl. Nevins, The Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 101 Anm. 16, 103-04; Rabun, J. Z.: "Alexander H. Stephens, 1812-1861," MS Dissertation, University of Chicago). Grier war charakterlich eher ungeeignet. Nach der Wahl Buchanan's zum Präsidenten versuchte er die Abset­zung von George Plitt, einem wichtigen Mitglied der Democratic Party in Philadelphia, und Mitglied am Circuit Court durchzuset­zen, um einem Neffen eine Anstellung zu verschaffen. Als Buchanan dies zurückwies, startete Grier eine Intrige und erreichte eine Memorandum von Mitgliedern der Anwaltskammer von Philadelphia, das Plitt's Absetzung erzwang (vgl. Nevins, a.a.O., S. 104).

 

 

Grierson, Benjamin H.:

US-BrigGen (Kavallerie); * 2.7.1826 Pittsburg; ehemaliger Musiklehrer; trat als Private bei Kriegsbeginn in die Armee ein; hatte zu­vor keinerlei militärische Erfahrung; wurde bereits am 24.10.1861 zum Major des 6th Illinois Cavalry Regiment gewählt; sechs Mo­nate später am 12.4.1862 zum Colonel der 6th Illinois Cavalry befördert.

 

Beim Vorstoß von Grant's Army of the Tennessee nach Süden Richtung Holly Springs ab 26.11.1862 faßte Grant seine Kavallerie in einer Kavallerie-Division unter Col T. Lyle Dickey zusammen. Die 1st Brigade unter Albert Lindley Lee wurde der Left Wing unter BrigGen Charles S. *Hamilton's unterstellt (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vo. I 72); die 2nd Brigade unter Colonel Ed­ward *Hatch gehörte zu Center Wing General *McPherson's, die 3rd Brigade unter Col Benjamin H. *Grierson zum Left Wing *Sherman's (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vo. I 72). Grierson's Brigade umfaßte 3rd Michigan Cavalry, 6th Illinois Ca­valry und Thielemann's Illinois Cavalry Battalion (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., I 72 Anm. 47).

 

Grierson wurde am 3.12.1862 als Brigadekommandeur durch Col John K. *Mizner abgelöst, und mit seiner 6th Illinois Cavalry zur weiträumigen Aufklärung westlich von Oxford / Mississippi (Karte Davis Nr. 154 E 11) eingesetzt (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O 98). Die Grün­de sind unklar. Starr (vgl. Starr: Union Cavalry, a.a.O., III 145) gibt an, daß Grierson's 6th Illinois Cavalry das einzige Cavalry-Re­giment in Sherman's Army Corps gewesen sei, weshalb er folgerichtig zum Chef von Sherman's Cavalry avanciert sei. Demgegen­über führt Bearss (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 72) neben der 6th Illinois Cavalry in Sherman's Corps auch John K Mizner's 3rd Michigan Cavalry und Thielemann's Illinois Cavalry Battalion auf. Nach OR Ser. I vol. XVII pt. 1 S. 497 hatte sich Mizner "re­portet for Duty", d.h. der Regimentskommandeur der 3rd Michigan war zeitweise ausgefallen. Mizner war 7.3.1862 zum Col beför­dert wurde, während Grierson's Rang vom 12.4.1862 stammte. Damit war Mizner rangälter und ihm stand deshalb die Bri­gadeführerschaft zu.

 

Im Dezember 1862 Verfolgung der Konföderierten nach deren erfolgreichen Raid gegen das US-Versorgungsdepot in Holly Springs (20.12.1862; s. auch **Griffith, *Ross’ Texas Brigade, *Holly Springs; vgl. Dunbar 93rd Illinois, a.a.O., S. 9, Internetdatei *Holly Springs Nr. 2); aufgrund der hierbei gezeigten Führungsfähigkeiten wurde er zum Brigadekommandeur befördert (+++++)

 

Am 19.12.1862 erlangten Scouts aus Mizner's Brigade Kenntnis von Van Dorn's Cavalry Vorstoß nach Norden, wobei das Ziel Holly Springs nicht bekannt geworden war (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., I 300). Als dem Oberbefehlshaber der Army of the Tennessee, MajGen US Grant das Vorgehen der CS-Raider gegen das Depot in Holly Springs gemeldet wurde, befahl er den sofortigen Entlastungsstoß durch die Infantry unter Col Carroll *Marsh, dem Commander des US-Districts of the Tallahatchie, der mit seinen Truppen 15 mi südlich von Holly Springs stand (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids, a.a.O., S. 59). Grant befahl Col weiterhin Col Mizner, der mit seiner Caval­ry von 2500 Reitern noch weiter südlich als Marsh's Infantry stand, ebenfalls noch vor Tagesanbruch am 21.12.1862 nach Norden auf Holly Springs vorzugehen (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids, a.a.O., S. 59; Grant, Julia Dent: Memoirs, a.a.O., S. 108). Hierbei ging er derart langsam vor, daß die Infantry unter Col Marsh schneller in Holly Springs eintraf, als Mizner's Cavalry. Grant war hierüber der­art zornig, daß er Mizner vorübergehend seines Postens enthob und Col Benjamin H. *Grierson zum Cavalry-Commander ernannte (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids, a.a.O., S. 61), jedoch wurde Mizner schon am 24.12.1862 erneut in sein altes Kommando eingesetzt (vgl. Longacre: Mounted Raids, a.a.O., S. 62)

 

Grierson war einer der besten Kavallerie-Offiziere des Krieges; Grierson führte im April 1863 eine US-Kavallerie-Brigade mit zwei Regimentern im spektakulärsten Kavallerie-Unternehmen des ganzen Krieges den Mississippi hinunter ins Herzland des Staates Missi­ssippi, wo sie *Pemberton's Nachschublinien stören und die Aufmerksamkeit der Konföderierten in einem kritischen Moment von Grant’s Armee vor Vicksburg ablenken sollten; der Raid verlief erfolgreich; er wurde von *Sherman als der „brillianteste Raid des Krieges“ bezeichnet (vgl. Evans: Sherman’s Horseman, Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik7 S. 2; McPherson, a.a.O., S. 616 ff.)

 

Grierson’s Raid (17.4.1863-2.5.1863) - auf Befehl Grant’s - 1863 führte von La Grange / Tennessee 16 Tage lang durch das konföde­rierte Mississippi. Kleine Gefechte, Überfälle auf CS-Versorgungsdepots und das Unterbrechen von Kommunikationsverbindungen führte in Mississippi zum völligen Durcheinander. Der Raid verlief erfolgreich. Die Konföderierten machten Jagd auf Grierson und wurden hierdurch von Vicksburg abgelenkt, wodurch Grant ein gefährliches Umgruppierungsmanöver durchführen konnte. Grant meinte später: „Grierson hat das Herz von Mississippi genommen.“ Der Raid endete in Baton Rouge / Louisiana. Für seinen Erfolg wurde Grierson am 3.6.1863 zum BrigGen befördert.

 

Nach dem Krieg war Grierson Colonel 10th US-Cavalry und nahm an den Indianerkämpfen teil. Grierson starb in Omena / Michigan am 1.9.1911.

 

Karten von Grierson’s Raid:

- Starr: Union Cavalry, vol. III S. 186

- Underwood, Larry D.: The Butternut Guerillas, a.a.O., vor S. 1

 

Photos:

- Underwood, Larry D.: The Butternut Guerillas, a.a.O., Preface

- Davis/Wiley, Photographic History, a.a.O., S. 31

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Brown, Dee Alexander: Grierson's Raid (Morningside, Dayton 1981; Reprint of original Urbana / Ill., 1954); 261 pp; Mapped End­papers; Photos; Index. The day-by-day account of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois Cavalry in their 600 mile ride through Mississippi to Baton Rouge in April 1863

- Catton, Bruce: The Civil War (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1985)

- Forbes, S.A.: Grierson's Cavalry Raid (Captain Co. B, 7th Illinois Cavalry), Adress before the Illinois Historical Society, Spring­field/Ill., 24.1.1907 (PDF-Datei, Archiv Ref, ameridownload, Griersonscavalry)

- Grierson, Benjamin: Papers (Illinois State Historical Library)

- McGowan, Col. J. E.: Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Raid; in: Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 750-769

- Starr: Union Cavalry, Vol. III, a.a.O., Kap. VIII, S. 185 ff.

- Surby, R. W.: Grierson Raids and Hatch Sixty-Four Days March with Biographical Sketches and the Life and Adventures of Chickasaw, the Scout (Chicago 1865) (PDF-Datei, Archiv Ref, ameridownload, Griersonraids)

- Underwood, Larry: The Butternut Guerillas: A Story of Grierson's Raid (Lincoln / NE: Dageforde Publishing, 1994); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik27

 

 

Griffin, Charles:

US-MajGen; ++++ Divisionskommandeur 1st Division V. Army Corps Army of the Potomac während Burnside's Angriff auf Frede­ricksburg im Nov./Dez. 1862 (vgl. Chamberlain: Bayonet forward, a.a.O., S. 2, 4)

 

 

Griffin, Eli Augustus:

US-Major; Co. F&S, 19th Regiment Michigan Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M545 Roll 16); 1864 während Sherman's Atlanta Campaign gehörte Griffin zur 19th Michigan Infantry, 2nd Bri­gade Col Samuel Ross, Butterfield's Division, XX Corps Hooker, Army of the Cumberland; das Regiment besetzte in der Nacht vom 19./20.5.1864 Cassville / Georgia (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 206). Griffin wurde tödlich verwundet bei den Kämp­fen um Gigal Church / Georgia am 15.6.1864 (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 280).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- **Griffin, Eli Augustus (Major 19th Michigan Infantry): Diary and Letters, Michigan Historical Collections, Bentley Library, University of Michigan, Ann Harbor

 

 

Griffin, John A.:

US-Pvt; Co. I, 8th Regiment Illinois Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M539 Roll 35; vgl. Hicken: Illinois in the Civil War, a.a.O., S. 393).

 

 

Griffin, John Levi:

CS-+++; 12th Georgia Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Griffin, John Levi: Diary. Typescript of unpublished diary of John Levi Griffin, a member of the 12th Georgia Infantry, 1861-62 (Emory University Library, Atlanta / Georgia)

 

 

Griffin, Simon G.:

US-Col; Brigadekommandeur 1st Brigade in der 2nd Division Robert B. Potter IX Army Corps John G. Parke während Grant's Vicksburg Campaign 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg vol. III, S. 1145).

 

 

Griffin, William H.:

CS-Captain; 2nd Battery, Maryland Artillery (Baltimore Horse Battery [vgl. Nye: Here come the Rebels, a.a.O., S. 82]); er war Batte­riechef ab Spätjahr 1862 der Nachfolger war Captain John B. *Brockenbrough (vgl. Wise: The long Arm of Lee, a.a.O., Bd. 2, S. 446).

 

Am 13.6.1863 eingesetzt bei Ewell's Angriff auf Winchester/VA im Rahmen der Gettysburg Campaign (vgl. Nye: Here come the Re­bels, a.a.O., S. 82; vgl. Goldsborough: The Maryland Line, a.a.O., S. 310).

 

 

Griffin, William Jordon:

CS-Pvt, Co. I, Co. I, 31st Regiment North Carolina Infantry (Angabe von Mildred Brooks Bowers, Great Granddaughter und   Sarah Victoria Roberson Manning, Granddaughter [vgl. United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division], vgl. http:// www.gbsudc.org/#/ancestorspg1/4528789696; Anm.: bei National Park Soldiers /Soldiers nicht genannt). Im Roster der 31st North Carolina Infantry ist William J- Griffin dagegen in Co. F genannt (vgl. North Carolina, General Assembly, Roster of North Carolina Troops in the War between the States, 1882, S. 556).


William J. Griffin was born Sept. 27, 1841 in Martin County, NC. He resided in Martin County NC where he enlisted at the age of 20 on Oct. 8, 1861. Captured at Roanoke Island on Feb. 8, 1862. Paroled at Elizabeth City on Feb. 21, 1862. Wounded by minnie ball to right shoulder at Drewry's Bluff, VA on May 16, 1864. Admitted General Hospital, Howards Grove, VA on May 17, 1864. Furloughed 60 days. Appears on a report at General Hospital Camp Winder, Richmond VA on Nov. 30, 1864. Furloughed 60 days. Captured at Jamesville, NC on Dec 10, 1864. POW. Confined at Point Lookout, MD. Exchanged Feb 10, 1865 at Camp Lee near
Richmond VA. Admitted to Wayside Hospital, Richmond VA Feb 14, 1865. Received Certificate of Disability for retiring invalid soldiers March 14, 1865. Soldiers application for pension approved Fourth Class. Married Sarah Jane Coltrain on Jan. 20, 1866. Sa­rah Jane was born Oct. 3, 1841 in Martin County and died Dec. 26, 1914 in Martin County. William J. Griffin died March 19, 1917 in Martin County, NC. (Angabe von Mildred Brooks Bowers, Great Granddaughter und Sarah Victoria Roberson Manning, Grand­daughter [vgl. United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division], vgl. http://www.gbsudc.org/#/ancestorspg1/ 4528789696).

 

Photo:

vgl. vgl. United Daughters of the Confederacy, North Carolina Division

 

 

Griffith, John Summerfield:

CS-+++General; Kaufmann und Viehhändler aus Rockwall / TX; gründete im Mai 1861 eine Milizkompanie in Stockwall, die Stock­wall Cavalry, welche nach der Musterung als Kompanie im neu aufgestellten 6th Texas Cavalry Regiment aufging.

 

Im Spätjahr 1862 war LtCol Griffith Brigadekommandeur der 1st Texas Cavalry Brigade und Mississippi bei der Abwehr von Grant's Vorstoß an der Mississippi Central Railroad im Rahmen von *Pemberton's Army beteiligt (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 81, 85-91, 93; Hale: Third Texas Cavalry, a.a.O., S. 138 ff). Griffith's Brigade bestand aus 3rd, 6th, 9th und 27th Texas Cavalry Re­giments (vgl. Hale, a.a.O., S. 139).

 

Griffith's Brigade bestand aus 3rd Texas Cavalry, 6th Texas Cavalry und 27th Texas Cavalry, unterstützt McNally's Arkansas Battery (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., vol. I S. 81n14) und Lt Ernest J. Meyers Pioneer Company (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., S. 82).

 

Griffith führte am 28.11.1862 den erfolgreichen Gegenangriff gegen US-BrigGen Cadwallader C. *Washburne's Cavalry Brigade in West-Mississippi bei Polkville. te (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 79 ff). Washburne's Cavalry bestand aus 1st Brigade mit Teilen der 1st Indiana Cavalry, Teilen der 3rd und 4th Iowa Cavalry, sowie 5th Illinois Cavalry und 9th Illinois Cavalry. Die 2nd Brigade umfaßte Detachments der 5th Kansas Cavalry, Teilen der 6th Missouri Cavalry, Teilen der 3rd und 10th Illinois Cavalry und der 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., I 80 Anm. 9). Washburn wurde von CS-LtCol John S. *Griffith's 1st Texas Cavalry Brigade, später als *Ross’ Brigade bezeichnet, ausmanövriert und beschloß den Rückzug aus der Region *Grenada Anfang Dezember 1862 (vgl. Bearss, Vicksburg Campaign, a.a.O., I 81-86). Griffith's Brigade bestand aus 3rd, 6th und 27th Texas Cavalry und vier Ge­schützen aus McNally's Arkansas Battery (vgl. Bearss, a.a.O., I 81n14, 85).

 

Washburne's Rückzug führte zum Raid auf Holly Springs /MS (sog. Van Dorn’s Raid) durch CS-LtCol *Griffith’s 1st Texas Brigade und zur Zerstörung des für die gesamte Operation Grant’s unabdingbaren Versorgungsdepot in *Holly Springs (vgl. auch: *Holly Springs, *Griffith, John Summerfield; *Ross’ Texas Brigade). Mit der Zerstörung des Depots in *Holly Springs am 20.12.1862 war das Ende von Grant’s Operation östlich von Vicksburg besiegelt, Grant’s Truppen zogen sich auf Memphis / MS zurück.

 

Griffith zog sich wegen seiner angeschlagenen Gesundheit 1863 aus dem aktiven Militärdienst zurück, wurde Mitglied des Texas Re­präsentantenhaus und dort Vorsitzender des Military Affairs Committee und Adjutant General der Texas Militia.

 

Photos:

- Internet Datei Holly Springs Nr. 1

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Dunbar, Aaron: History of the Ninety-Third Regiment Illinois Infantry, 5.10.1898, revised and edited by Harvey M. Trimble, Adju­tant; Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik15, S. 9

- Internetdatei Holly Spring Nr. 1 und 2

 

 

Griffith, Richard:

CS-BrigGen; Brigadekommandeur; gefallen bei Savage Station am 29.6.1862; seine Brigade übernahm William *Barksdale (vgl. Freeman: Lee's Lieutenants, a.a.O., 2: 332).

 

 

Griggs, George K.:

CS-Captain, 38th Virginia Infantry; Teilnahme an Pickett's Charge während des Battle of Gettysburg

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Griggs, George: Diary of George Griggs, Southern Historical Society Papers, VI (1878), 250

 

Grigsby, Abner J.:

CS-Corporal; Co. I, 59th Regiment Virginia infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23); auch Co. I, 2nd Regiment Virginia Infantry.

 

 

Grigsby, Alexander F.:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 17th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23)

 

Grigsby, Andrew J.:

CS-Col; Co. F&S, 27th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

Im Frühjahr 1862 LtCol 27th Virginia Infantry; Teilnahme am Battle of Kernstown am 23.3.1862 (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 130). Regimentskommandeur 27th Virginia Infantry Stonewall Brigade ab April 1862 (vgl. Tanner: Stonewall in the Valley, a.a.O., S. 166).

 

Im Battle of Antietam am 17.9.1862 war Grigsby Brigadekommandeur von Winder's Brigade (vgl. Priest: Antietam, a.a.O., S. 4), Jo­nes' (Jackson's) Division, bestehend aus 4VA, 5, VA, 27VA und 33 VA, eingesetzt im Cornfield und West Woods (vgl. Priest: Antie­tam, a.a.O., S. 4)

 

 

Grigsby, Caldwell:

CS-Pvt; Cayce's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Purcell Artillery) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

 

Grigsby, Elijah:

CS-Pvt; Co. G, 12th Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

 

Grigsby, Isaac:

CS-Pvt; Co. H, 48th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23)

 

 

Grigsby, James W.:

CS-Pvt, Co. I, 30th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23); auch 47th Virginia Infantry

 

 

Grigsby, J. Warren:

CS-Col; 6th Kentucky Cavalry; John Hunt Morgan's Cavalry Division, Bragg's Army of Tennessee; Teilnahme an Morgan's Raid nach Kentucky, Indiana und Ohio im Juni 1863 (vgl. Horwitz: The Longest Raid, a.a.O., S. 8)

 

Während Sherman's Atlanta Campaign 1864 war Grigsby Brigadekommandeur von Grigsby's Kentucky Cavalry Brigade, Humes's Division, Cavalry Corps MajGen Joseph Wheeler, Hood's Corps. Die Brigade bestand aus folgenden Regimentern (vgl. B & L, vol. IV, S. 291):

- 1st Kentucky Cavalry Col J. R. Butler

- 2nd Kentucky Cavalry Major T. W. Lewis

- 9th Kentucky Cavalry Col W. C. P. Breckenridge

- 2nd Kentucky Battalion Capt. J. B. Dortch

 

Grigsby's Cavalry Brigade verteidigte abgesessen, neben zwei Regimentern Arkansas Infantry, am 8.5.1864 *Dugs Gap (ein Paß auf den westlichen Ausläufern der *Rocky Face Ridge) gegen den den Vorstoß Sherman's nach Süden (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 134).

 

Hintergrund war: Bereits am 7.5.1864 hatte die Aufklärung Grigsby's ergeben, daß Sherman mit der Division BrigGen John Geary’s 2nd Division, XX Corps MajGen Joseph P. Hooker, Army of the Cumberland von Tunnel Hill über Mill Gap westlich der Rocky Face Ridge nach Süden vorstieß (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 134). Beim weiteren Vorstoß nach Süden Richtung Re­seca wurde Dug Gap am 8.5.1864 von BrigGen John Geary’s 2nd Division, XX Corps MajGen Joseph P. Hooker, Army of the Cum­berland als Ablenkungmanöver für McPherson’s Stoß auf den 10 mi südlich gelegenen Snake Creek Gap, angegriffen. Der Angriff der Division Geary erfolgte gegen die auf dem Steilhang liegenden CS-Regimenter in harten verlustreichen Kämpfen, teilweise im Hand­gemenge Mann gegen Mann. Die Brigade Warren brachte lediglich 800 Mann in die 'Fire Line', da, wie bei allen Cavalry-Ein­heiten im abgessenen Einsatz üblich, jeder vierte Mann rückwärts mir der Bewachung der Pferde eingesetzt war (vgl. Castel, a.a.O., S. 134). Die US-Truppen erreichten mehrfach die Anhöhe, wurden jedoch immer wieder geworfen. Geary brach den verlustreichen (357 Ca­sualties) Ablenkungs-Angriff ab, nachdem die 2nd Division BrigGen Thomas W. Sweeny, XVI Corps MajGen Grenville M. Dodge, McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee, im von Westen her über Villanow geführten Stoß den nicht verteidigten Snake Creek Creek Gap besetzt hatte (vgl. Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O., S. 132 ff.)

 

Bei Sherman’s weiterem Vorstoß nach Süden Richtung Reseca Anfang Mai 1864 machte John A. Logan’s XV. Corps / McPherson’s Army of the Tennessee am 9.5.1864 als Ablenkungsmanöver einen scheinbaren Vorstoß von Dug Gap Richtung Osten durch die Rocky Face Ridge (vgl. Karte bei Castel: Decision in the West, a.a.O.., S. 122), um den Vorstoß von Grenville Dodge’s XVI. Corps / Army of the Tennessee auf Resaca zu verschleiern (vgl. Secrist: Battle of Resaca, a.a.O., S. 14).

 

Nachdem Joseph E. Johnston von BrigGen Cantey aus Resaca am Abend des 8.5.1864 die Meldung über die US-Truppen im Raum Villanow und von der ihm bisher offenbar unbekannten Straße über Snake Creek Gap Richtung Resaca erhielt, setzte er Warren Gis­by’s Cavalry Brigade zur Aufklärung auf Snake Creek Gap an. Grisby trat gegen 22.00 Uhr am 8.5.1864 an und erreichte über Sugar Valley im Morgengrauen des 9.5.1864 den Südeingang zur Schlucht. Nach Grisby’s Informationen sollte dort eine Kompanie CS-Ge­orgia Infantry eingesetzt sein. Grisby geriet deshalb überraschend unter Beschuß durch die abgesessen eingesetzte 9th Illinois Moun­ted Infantry, die die vorgeschobene US-Sicherung bildete. Weitere US-Regimenter griffen in das Scharmützel ein. Grisby war vor den überlegenen US-Kräften zum Rückzug gezwungen und führte das verzögende Gefecht bis vor Resaca (vgl. Castel, a.a.O., S. 136-37).

 

Um Mitternacht des 9./10.5.1864 meldete Grigsby an Johnston, daß McPherson Stellungen in Snake Creek Gap ausbaue (vgl. Castel: a.a.O., S. 145).

 

 

Grigsby, Lucian Porter:

CS-Pvt, Co. C, 1st Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23);

 

 

Grigsby, Melvin:

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grigsby, Melvin (Colonel 3rd US Vol. Cavalry): The Smoked Yank (Chicago 1899); Revised Edition with Appendix; the appendix was written by Grigsby to document the facts in the original book which was only distributed to his friends. This was the first regular printing of this title with illustrations

 

 

Grigsby, William E.:

CS-Pvt, Co. C, 25th Regiment Virginia Militia (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

 

Grigsby, William E.:

CS-Pvt, Co. E, 15th Regiment Virginia Cavalry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

 

Grigsby, William G.:

CS-Pvt, Co. G, 49th Regiment Virginia Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M382 Roll 23).

 

 

Grimes, Absalom:

US-Pvt, Co. F, 32nd Regiment Missouri Infantry (US) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M390 Roll 18).

 

 

Grimes, Andrew Jackson:

CS-Pvt, Co. D, 2nd Battalion Alabama Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 17).

 

 

Grimes, Bryan:

CS-MajGen; 2.11.1828 in "Grimesland", Pitt County, North Carolina - 14.8.1880; +++ Col 4th North Carolina Infantry. At Seven Pi­nes, all his officers and 462 of 500 men were either killed or wounded. Während Lee's Maryland Campaign vom September 1862 war die 4th North Carolina eingesetzt in George B. Anderson's Brigade, Daniel H. Hill's Division, Stonewall Jackson Army Corps. Teil­nahme am Battle of South Mountain am 14.9.1862. Die 4th North Carolina machte eine Aufklärung von Turner's Gap Richtung Fox's Gap unter Captain E. A. Osborne, wo sie US-Brigade (wahrscheinlich Colonel H. S. Fairchild's Brigade aus Rodman's Division; vgl. hierzu Hill: Battle of South Mountain, B & L vol. II, Anm. S. 568) aufgeklärt wurde, deren Flankierung möglich war. Auf Grund von Osborne's Bericht versuchte Grimes den Flankenangriff, der jedoch rechtzeitig erkannt wurde. Nach kurzem Feuergefecht zog sich Grimes Richtung Turner's Gap zurück (vgl. Hill: Battle of South Mountain, B & L vol. II S. 567). Grimes, known as the „fighting ge­neral“ who led his men from the front line, he served with Lee in most of the South’s campaigns, rising to fame at Spotsylvania whe­re he repulsed repeated Union attacks designed to split Lee’s forces. He issued the last attack order at Appomattox Courthouse in April 1865.

 

Photo:

- Warner: Generals in Gray, a.a.O., S. 121

- L:R Edwin A. Osborne, Bryan Grimes and John F. Shaffner (aus http://www.findagrave.com/)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grimes, Bryan (4th NC Infantry): Extracts of Letters of MajGen Bryan Grimes to his Wife (Raleigh, 1883; reprint Broadfoot 1986); edited by Gary Gallagher

- Harrel, Allen, T.: Lee's Fighting General. Bryan Grimes of North Carolina (Stackpole, Mechanicsburg), 288 pp, Photos, Illustrati­ons, Maps

 

 

Grimes, Charles:

CS-Pvt, Co. E, 2nd Battalion Alabama Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 17).

 

 

Grimes, Charles S.:

CS-Pvt, Co. A, 6th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5).

 

 

Grimes, Charles T.:

CS-Pvt, Co. A, 6th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M377 Roll 5).

 

 

Grimes, J. A. C.:

CS-Pvt; 7th North Carolina Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 15).

 

 

Grimes, James W.:

US-Abgeordneter im Congress; aus Iowa; Grimes wendete sich 1864 gegen die Schaffung des Ranges eines LtGen in der US-Army und der Beförderung USS Grant's von MajGen auf diesen Rang, weil damit eine enorme Gehaltserhöhung und erhebliche Kosten für die US-Regierung verbunden waren (vgl. Nevins: The War for the Union: The Organized War to Victory, a.a.O., S. 7).

 

 

Grimes, Nicolas M.:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 27th Alabama Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M374 Roll 17).

 

 

Grimes, Paul C.:

CS-Pvt; Co. B, 5th Missouri Infantry Regiment (vgl. National Park Soldiers M380 Roll 6).

 

 

Grimes, William C.:

CS-Pvt; Co. I, 115th Regiment, Indiana Infantry (6 months, 1863-4) (vgl. National Park Soldiers M540 Roll 29); 1844 - † 1914, be­erd. Oak Hill Cemetery, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County/Indiana; °° mit Mary E. Grimes (1848-1912) (vgl. www. Findagra­ve. Com).

 

Photo:

Grabstein Wm. C. Grimes, Oak Hill Cemetery, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County/Indiana (vgl. www. Findagra­ve. Com).

 

 

Grimsley, Daniel A.:

CS-Major; Grimsley war +++ Captain in der 6th Virginia Cavalry++++, da Krick (a.a.O., S. 52 mit Zitat Nr. 32) angibt, einer der Captains der 6th Virginia Cavalry habe berichtet, daß ....; Freemann, Lee's Lieutenants, vol III, a.a.O., erwähnt Grimsley als Major.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grimsley, Daniel A.: Battles in Culpeper County, Virginia (Culpeper, Va., 1900)

 

 

Grinnel, Moses Hicks:

1803-77; Mitinhaber der New Yorker Firma Grinnel und Minturn (vgl. Burlingame/Ettlinger: Inside Lincoln's White House. The Complete Civil War Diary of John Hay, a.a.O., S. 1, 270 Anm. 2).

 

 

Grisamore, Silas T.:

CS-Major; 18th Louisiana Infantry. 1862 während der Shiloh-Campaign gehörte die 18th Louisiana Infantry zum II. Army Corps MajGen Braxton Bragg 1st Division BrigGen Daniel Ruggles 3rd Brigade Col Preston Pond (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a,a.aO., S. 321). Zusammen mit der am äußersten CS-Flügel der CS-Army of the Tennessee eingesetzten Brigade Pond ging die Einheit am 6.4.1862 gegen 8:00 links neben Anderson’s Brigade, nach Norden gegen die Shiloh Branch (des Owl Creek) vor und drang anschließend in das fluchtartig verlassene Camp der 6th Iowa Infantry ein (vgl. Daniel: Shiloh, a.a.O., S. 173).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Grisamore, Silas T. (18th Louisiana): The Civil War Reminiscenses of Major Silas T. Grisamore, C. S. A. (Louisiana State Univ); edited by Arthur Bergeron, Jr., 240 pp; 1st published as Reminiscences of Uncle Silas in 1981. An interesting glimpse of the war on the Civil War's Western Theater

 

 

Griscom, George L.:

CS-+++; 1837-+++, geboren in Pennsylvania; zog als 10jähriger mit seiner Familie nach Virginia; seine Eltern waren dort mit Robert E. Lee's Familie befreundet. Griscom erhielt eine gute Schulausbildung in Virginia. 1857 zog er als 20jähriger Texas und lebte seit 1859 in Dallas (vgl. Crabb, a.a.O., S. xxxiv). Adjutant 9th Texas Cavalry; die Schreibweise des Namens bei Bearss, Vicksburg Cam­paign, a.a.O., I 49 Anm. 23 mit 'Grissom' ist falsch (vgl. Crabb, a.a.O., S. xxxiv).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Crabb, Martha L.: All Afire to Fight: The untold Tale of the Civil War's Ninth Texas Cavalry (New York: Avon Books, Inc, 2000); Bibliothek Ref MilAmerik18

- Kerr, Homer L. (ed.): Fighting with Ross' Texas Brigade, C.S.A.: The Diary of George L. Griscom, Adjutant 9th Texas Cavalry (Hillsboro, Texas: Hill Junior College Press, 1976)

 

 

Grissom, Granville:

CS-Pvt; 1814-90; Co C, 3rd Battalion North Carolina Senior Reserves (vgl. National Park Soldiers M230 Roll 15).

 

1814 - † 1892; beerd. Island Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Williamsboro, Vance County/NC; °° mit Fanny Grissom Wade (1853-1894) (vgl. findagrave.com, Abruf vom 28.5.2016).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Neathery, J. Marshall: Genealogy, 1996 (Virginia Tech, Univ. Libraries, Special Collections: Civil War guide. Manuscript Sources for Civil War Research in the Special Collections Department of the Virginia Tech Libraries Ms 96-002).

 

 

Griswold, Charles E.:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry; er trat als LtCol in das Regiment ein (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 16).

 

16.11.1834 Boston - † gef. 6.5.1864 Battle of the Wilderness; beerd. Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton/Massachusetts (vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 26.7.2016).

 

Photo:

- New England Civil War Museum, vgl. www.findagrave.com, Abruf vom 26.7.2016

 

 

Groninger, William H.:

US-+++; 126th Pennsylvania Infantry (Gallagher u.a.: Fredericksburg, a.a.O., S. 112 Anm. 81)

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Groninger, William H. (126th Pennsylvania): "With Gen. Burnside at Fredericksburg," National Tribune, April 11, 126

 

 

Gross, Karl:

US-+++; 52nd Illinois Infantry

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gross, Karl: Letter (Shiloh National Military Park, Shiloh / Tennessee: 52nd Illinois File)

 

 

Grover, Andrew J.:

US-Major; 76th New York Infantry

 

Im Sommer 1863 war Major Andrew J. Grover Regimentskommandeur 76th New York Infantry 2nd Brigade BrigGen Lysander *Cutler 1st Division BrigGen James S. *Wadsworth I Army Corps MajGen Abner *Doubleday, Meade's Army of the Potomac (vgl. Pfanz: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 443) und nahm am Battle von Gettysburg teil (vgl. Martin: Gettysburg, a.a.O., S. 95, 108).

 

 

Grover, Cuvier:

US-MajGen; 1828-85; aus Maine; West Point 1850 (4/44); US-Berufsoffizier; überquerte zur Erkundung von Eisenbahntrassen die Rocky Mountains 1853; Teilnahme an der Utah Expedition gegen die Mormonen 1858-59; die Behauptung, Grover habe die Garni­son von Fort Union / New Mexiko 1861 gerettet ist falsch (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 363); dagegen gibt Nevins an: Commanding at Fort Union in New Mexico in 1861 in the Rank of Captain, he refused a Confederate demand for surrender, burned his stores and made a successful forced march to safety beyond the Missouri River (vgl. Nevins: Col Wainwright, a.a.O., S. 41 n). BrigGen seit 14.4.1862; als Nachfolger von BrigGen *Nagley übernahm Grover im April 1862 die 1st Brigade Division Joseph Hooker III Army Corps Army of the Potomac (1, 2, III, Potomac) (vgl. Nevins: Col Wainwright, a.a.O., S. 41, ) - 16.9.1862 (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 363). ++++ MajGen USV 19.10.1864. In der Nachkriegszeit weiterhin Berufsoffizier in der RA und Col 1st US Cavalry.

 

 

Grover, Ira G.:

US-Col; 7th Indiana Infantry; im Sommer 1863 war Grover Regimentskommandeur 7th Indiana Infantry 2nd Brigade BrigGen Ly­sander *Cutler 1st Division BrigGen James S. *Wadsworth I Army Corps MajGen Abner *Doubleday, Meade's Army of the Potomac und nahm am Battle von Gettysburg teil.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- McLean, James Jr: Cutler‘s Brigade at Gettysburg (Butternut & Blue); 253 pp; over 30 maps; 55 photos; Index; Appendix. A new printing of a limited edition originally published in 1987, this title is a detailed study of the morning fight at Gettysburg and Union Cavalry delaying action; this brigade was heavily engaged in all three days of the battle and had tremendous casualties, with four of six regiments losing 50% of their men

 

 

Groves, George A.:

CS-Captain; Batteriechef von Groves' Artillery Battery. Die Battery gehörte ab Juni 1861 zu BrigGen Arnold *Elzey's Brigade in Joseph E. Johnston's Army im Shenandoah Valley (vgl. Davis: Battle of Bull Run, a.a.O., S. 84).

 

 

Grumman, Henry B.:

US-Corporal, Battery B, 3rd Regiment, New York Light Artillery (vgl. National Park Soldiers M551 Roll 56); Alternative Name:

Henry B./Greenman

 

 

Grumman, Josiah M.:

US-First Lieutenant; † 9.8.1862 Washington/DC nach Verwundung am 29.8.1862 im Battle of Second Manassas; Co. H, 14th New York (Brooklyn) Militia Regiment (vgl. Tevis: Fighting Four­teenth, a.a.O., S. 294). Lt Grumman geriet Gefecht von Falls Church am 18.11.1861 in Kriegsgefangenschaft (vgl. Tevis: Fighting Fourteenth, a.a.O., S. 29).

 

 

Guerrant, Edward O.:

CS-+++; Guerrant, from Kentucky, served on the staffs of Morgan, Preston, Marshall and Cosby and was witness to the "massacre" of Black Union soldiers at Saltville in October 1864.

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Guerrant, Edward O.: Bluegrass Confederate: The Headquarters Diary of Edward O. Guerrant (LSU Press); 584 pp; Edited by Wil­liam C. Davis and Meredith Swentor

 

 

Guerry, Peter V.:

CS-Captain; Co C 15th Alabama Infantry; gefallen 1st Cold Harbor

 

 

Guibor, Henry:

geb. 1823 Elsaß/Frankreich (vgl. Gerteis: The Civil War in Missouri, a.a.O., S. 41) - † 17.10.1899 (vgl. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Henry_Guibor); CS-Lt; Artillery; Missouri State Guard; führte während des Rückzugs von Claiborne *Jackson nach Südwest-Mis­souri einen Teil der CS Artillery; Battle of Carthage am 5.7.1861 (vgl. Brooksher: Bloody Hill, a.a.O., S. 122).

 

Guibor hailed from St. Louis, Missouri, and served in the U.S.-Mexican War. By the Civil War, Guibor was serving as an officer in the state militia artillery battery. Guibor, like many state militiamen, were arrested in the seizure of Camp Jackson in St. Louis by Na­thaniel Lyon, but was soon parolled. Guibor eventually traveled southeast from St. Louis and joined Governor Claiborne Fox Jack­son's Missouri State Guard. He received command of a battery of four six-pound smoothbore guns. Not long afterward, Guibor's bat­tery saw action in the battles of Carthage,Wilson's Creek, Dry Wood Creek, and Lexington (vgl. http://en.wikipedia. Org/ wiki/Hen­ry_Guibor).

 

The battery was reorganized and mustered into Confederate service at Memphis, Tennessee, by December 1861. It was soon re-atta­ched to Sterling Price's army and again saw action at the battles of Pea Ridge, Iuka, and Corinth. Guibor's command then was trans­ferred to John C. Pemberton's Confederate army securing portions of Mississippi. Guibor was wounded in an artillery duel with a Fe­deral river squadron in the Battle of Grand Gulf. Guibor was captured with Pemberton's army in the fall of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Paroled, Guibor's command shifted to the defense of northern Georgia where he saw extensive action, including fighting around At­lanta, Georgia, where he was again wounded. His battery joined with John Bell Hood's army in the sweep north into Tennessee and was engaged in the battles of Franklin and Murfreesboro. Finally, Guibor and his men surrendered with remnants of Joseph E. John­ston's army in North Carolina on April 26, 1865 (vgl. http://en.wikipedia. Org/ wiki/Henry_Guibor).

 

Photo:

Captain Henry Guibor (vgl. http://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/civil_war_series/26/images/fig50.jpg).

 

Urkunden/Literatur:

- Banasik, Michel E. (ed.): Missouri Brothers in Gray. The Reminiscenses and Letters of William J. Bull and John P. Bull, Iowa City 1998, S. 10 Anm. 23

- OR vol. 3, 32, 101, 186; OR vols 17, 24, 32, 38, 39; OR Series 2, vol. 1, 556

- Shea/Hess: Pea Ridge, a.a.O., S. 162-164

- Snead: Fight for Missouri, a.a.O., S. 217

 

 

Guiney, Patrick R.:

US-Col; zunächst Captain, Co. F&S, 9th Regiment Massachusetts Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M544 Roll 17).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Guiney, Patrick R.: Commanding Boston's Irish Ninth: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Patrick R. Guiney, Ninth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Edited by Christian G. Samito (New York: Fordham University Press, 1998)

 

 

Guinn, Hamilton:

CS-Pvt, Co. A, 52nd Virginia Infantry Regiment

 

Photo:

CS-Pvt Hamilton Guinn, Co. A, 52nd Virginia Infantry Regiment, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington

 

 

Gumbart, G. C.:

US-Lt; Battery E 2nd Illinois Light Artillery

 

Battery ‘E’ 2nd Illinois Light Artillery gehörte im Frühjahr 1862 zur 1st Brigade Oglesby, 1st Division McClernand, Grant’s Army of the Tennessee bei der Eroberung von *Fort Donelson im Februar 1862 (vgl. US Grant; in: Battles and Leaders Vol. I S. 429; Wallace, Lew: The Capture of Fort Donelson; in: B&L, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 417-419).

 

 

Gunnells, W. L.:

CS-Captain, 3rd Louisiana Infantry. Während der Pea Ridge Campaign im Frühjahr 1862 gehörte das Regiment unter Regiments­kommandeur Major Will F. *Tunnard zur Brigade Louis Hébert. Am 7.3.1862 eingesetzt bei den Kämpfen in Morgan’s Woods (vgl. Shea / Hess, a.a.O., S. 125 mit Karte S. 123; 131-133 mit Karte S. 132, 134 ff).

 

 

Guppey, J. J.:

US-Col; Regimentskommandeur 23rd Wisconsin Infantry, 10th Division Andrew J. Smith, XIII. Army Corps McClernand während Grant's Campaign gegen Vicksburg 1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, vol. II, S. 402). Battle of Port Gibson am 1.5.1863 (vgl. Bearss: Vicksburg, a.a.O., vol. II, S. 402).

 

 

Gurley, Captain:

CS-Captain, Cavalry; gehörte zu Morgan's Raid; Gurley's Männer hatten während eines Gefechts im Herbst 1862 im südlichen Ten­nessee US-Gen Robert L. McCook getötet. Gurley wurde deshalb nach seiner Gefangennahme bei der Zerschlagung von Morgan's Raiders als "bushwacker", "Guerilla" (vgl. Boatner, a.a.O., S. 529 unter Robert McCook) und Mörder von Gen McCook in Nashville / TN vor ein Kriegsgericht gestellt, jedoch freigesprochen und als Kriegsgefangener behandelt (vgl. McGowan, Col. J. E.: Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Raid; in: Annals of the War, a.a.O., S. 767).

 

 

Guthrie, James:

Vorkriegspolitiker; Secretary ++++ in der Regierung Buchanan; er vertrat wirtschaftlich eine Politik des Freihandels und der niedri­gen Einfuhrzölle und wandte sich gegen die Schutzzölle (vgl. Nevins, Emergence of Lincoln, vol. I, a.a.O., S. 224).

 

 

Guthrie, Harvy:

CS-Pvt; Co. D, 6th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M.377 Roll 5).

 

 

Guthrie, James:

CS-Pvt; Co. K, 6th Regiment Kentucky Mounted Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M.377 Roll 5).

 

 

Guthrie, James V.:

US-Col; Co. F&S, 1st Regiment Kentucky Infantry (vgl. National Park Soldiers M386 Roll 11).

 

aus Covington, Ky.; er stellte im April 1861 ein Regiment von US-Freiwilligen in Kentucky auf, die spätere 1st Kentucky Infantry (US)(vgl. Kelly: Holding Kentucky für the Union; in: B&L I S. 375)

 

 

Gwin, William:

US-Lt Navy. Stadt und Hafen am Tennessee River in Nord Tennessee östlich von Shiloh. Am 1.3.1862 griff US-Lt William Gwinn mit den Gunboats Lexington und Tyler den CS Vorposten in Pittsburg Landing am Tennessee River (vgl. Karte: Davis Nr. 144) an, worauf die CS-Truppen ihre Stellungen räumten (vgl. Catton: Grant Moves South, a.a.O., S. 201).

 

 

Gwynn, Walter:

CS-MajGen; February 22, 1802 – February 6, 1882) was a civil engineer and soldier who became a Virginia Provisional Army gene­ral and North Carolina militia brigadier general in the early days of the American Civil War in 1861 and subsequently a Confederate States Army colonel. He was a railroad engineer and railroad president before the Civil War, Florida Comptroller in 1863 and a civil engineer after the Civil War (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_ Gwynn).

 

Gwynn was born in Jefferson County, West Virginia (now West Virginia), the grandson of Humphrey Gwynn, a descendant of Colo­nel Hugh Gwynn, who settled in Virginia before 1640.Walter Gwynn was the son of Thomas Peyton Gwynn, born April 19, 1762, and Ann. Thomas Peyton Gwynn died in 1810, the same year his daughter, Frances Ann Gwynn, married William Branch Giles, Se­nator and later Governor of Virginia. William B. Giles and Frances were Walter Gwynn's guardians in 1818 when he entered West Point, according to the records. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, in the Class of 1822 and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Artillery, later transferring to the 4th U.S. Artillery. In 1827, while still an artillery lieutenant, he helped survey the route for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Walter_ Gwynn).

 

He resigned his army commission in February 1832. From 1833 to 1836, he worked as chief engineer in charge of the construction of the Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad. He was Superintendent and Chief Engineer of the Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad in North Carolina from 1836 to 1840; also during this period, he conducted surveys for several other railroad and canal projects in Florida, North Carolina, and Virginia. From 1842 to 1846 he was president of the Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad, and in 1846, he became president of the James River and Kanawha Canal Company, a position which he held until 1853, when he moved from Richmond, Virginia, to Raleigh, North Carolina. In 1850, Gwynn was hired by the North Carolina Rail Road Company as Chief Engineer "Em­ployed on the Surveys and Location of the North Carolina Rail Road, from the commencement of operations to the completion of the location." Gwynn supervised construction of the North Carolina Railroad until it was completed in early 1856. Between 1853 and 1855, he conducted surveys for the Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad and the Western North Carolina Railroad; and from 1848 to 1855 he was the chief engineer of the Wilmington & Manchester Railroad. He was also chief engineer of the Blue Ridge Rail Road Company in South Carolina in the 1850s. Gwynn's concurrent positions with multiple railroads was considered controversial and was criticized at times, but his qualifications and accomplishments overshadowed such criticism. But by the late 1850s, he had establis­hed an international reputation as a railroad engineer and as a founder of the southeastern railroad network. A colleague said that Gwynn "made for himself a reputation among his fellow engineers that will last for all time." In 1857, he retired from railroad work and moved to South Carolina (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_ Gwynn).

 

Col 1st Virginia Infantry (Miliz) bis 1853; Gwynn wurde im April 1861 zum MajGen der Virginia Troops ernannt; er übernahm das Kommando in Norfolk / VA (vgl. Ruffin Diary II 8); nachdem sich herausstellte, daß Gwynn die Verteidigungsstellun­gen um Norfolk nicht intensiv ausbaute und es zu Irritationen zwischen Army und Navy kam, wurde er auf Be­fehl von Robert E. Lee nach dessen In­spektionsreise nach Norfolk vom 16.5.1861 abgelöst und durch BrigGen Benjamin *Huger er­setzt (vgl. Freeman: Ro­bert E. Lee, a.a.O., S. 508). Barrett vertritt hierzu eine andere Ansicht (vgl. Barret, John Gilchrist: North Carolina as a Civil War Battleground, a.a.O., S. 17): Soon after seceding from the Union, North Carolinians made preparations to defend their coast. Two departments of coastal defense were created and put ander the respective commands of Generals Walter Gwynn and Theophilus Holmes. These offi­cers immediately began to strengthen existing fortifications und to built new ones.

 

At the start of the Civil War, Gwynn was a major in the engineers of the South Carolina Militia. At the request of the governor, he had accepted the commission and was instrumental in the planning of the attack on Fort Sumter in early 1861 as a member of the Ordnance Board. He was later charged with constructing batteries at various strategic points inCharleston Harbor, facing Fort Sumter. On April 10, 1861, he accepted a commission as major general of the Virginia Militia and was directed by Virginia governor John Letcher to assume command of the defenses around Norfolk and Portsmouth until mid-May. Working with Gwynn at Norfolk was William Mahone, who was the president of the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. Working under Gwynn's authority, Mahone (who was still a civilian) helped bluff the Federal troops into abandoning the Gosport Shipyard in Portsmouth by running a single passenger train into Norfolk with great noise and whistle-blowing, then much more quietly, sending it back west, and then returning the same train again, creating the illusion of large numbers of arriving troops to the Federals listening in Portsmouth across the Elizabeth River (and just barely out of sight). The ruse worked, and not a single Confederate soldier was lost as the Union autho­rities abandoned the area, and retreated to Fort Monroe across Hampton Roads (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_ Gwynn).

 

In 1861, Gwynn oversaw construction of defensive fortifications at Sewell's Point, which was across the mouth of Hampton Roads from Fort Monroe at Old Point Comfort. He also participated in the Battle of Big Bethel during the Blockade of the Chesapea­ke Bay (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Gwynn).

 

Gwynn also served as a brigadier general in the Virginia Provisional Army and then brigadier general in the North Carolina Militia, commanding the Northern Coast Defenses of North Carolina. All of these general-officer assignments were in the spring and summer of 1861 (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Gwynn).

 

By August he joined the Confederate States Army as a major of engineers and was promoted to colonel on October 9, 1862. (Fellow railroader Mahone also joined the Confederate Army, eventually achieving the rank of major general after becoming the so-called 'Hero of the Battle of the Crater,' which took place near Petersburg in 1864 (vgl. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Gwynn).

 

Urkunden/Urkunden/Literatur:

- Gwynn, Walter Order, 1 May 1861, of Major General Walter Gwynn (1802-1882), Commander of Forces in Norfolk Harbor, directing Captain William McBlair (d. 1863) to take command of the batteries and guns on Craney Island (vgl. Library of Viginia, Richmond/VA, Civil War Records, Accession 38096)

- Gwynn, Walte:r Letters, 1861, of Walter Gwynn (1802-1882), brigadier general commanding the defenses of Norfolk, Virginia, consisting of a letter, 25 May 1861, from William W. Lamb (1804-1874), mayor of Norfolk, to Gwynn and transcripts of letters, 20 May 1861, from Gwynn to R. S. Garnett (1819-1861), adjutant general of Virginia forces, and to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the forces of Virginia, concerning an assault by Union vessels on an unfinished battery at Sewell’s Point and Gwynn’s defense of it during the early days of the Civil War. Also includes a photocopy of the first page of an article on the 1864 assault on Fort Fisher in North Carolina (vgl. Library of Virginia, Richmond/VA, Civil War Records, Accession 38096)

 

Aktuelles

Homepage online

Auf meiner  Internetseite stelle ich mich und meine Hobbys vor.

 

 

Besucher seit 1.1.2014